Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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World’s first $332,000 lab-grown burger to change the global diet

World’s first $332,000 lab-grown burger to change the global diet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A Dutch scientist is offering the world’s first cultivated beef made of stem cells to taste. He believes the lab-grown meat will feed the world and help save the environment.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The report also encourages people to be more creative and diversify their diet to include beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, worms, wasps and bees. For example, “most edible insects boast equal or higher iron content than beef,” the report suggests. More than two billion people – mostly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America consume insects, according to the article.

For example, 100g of insects is 72 percent protein and clock in at 96 calories and 16 per cent fat. The same weight in beef is 52 percent protein, and clocks in at 285 calories and 48 per cent fat, ctvnews.ca calculated. 

An Austrian designer was reportedly turned the UN recommendation to “eat insects” into a household appliance producing 2.4 kilograms of larvae protein from black soldier fly eggs.  One week’s worth of harvest (500 g) produces enough larvae for about two meals, according to ctvnews.ca"

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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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FFS 008 Edible Insects: the diet of tomorrow?

Published on Feb 22, 2017
This week, we discuss the exciting world of edible insects with Robert Nathan Allen from Little Herds.

Little Herds is an educational non-profit based in Austin, Texas teaching and spreading awareness about edible insects as a resource efficient, economically viable, nutritious and delicious food for us to eat, and as feed for the animal products that we consume.

We discuss the enormous potential of edible insects; how incorporating them into Western diets and food systems could help us meet the current and future nutritional and environmental demands and needs of a growing world population.

In this episode, you’ll hear all about:

what edible insects are
RNA’s love story with bugs
The historical and cultural significance of edible insects across societies and cultures
Western taboos towards insects and how we can overcome them
first impressions and how they taste as I try them live on air!
the nutritional benefits of edible insects compared to other livestock
the resource efficiency of edible insects (feed conversion ratio, land and water use)
the ethical argument for eating insects
insects as feed for our livestock
criticisms and concerns about edible insects
RNA’s tips, tricks and suggestions about edible insects
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New Blog on the block !! 

New Blog on the block !!  | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

I don’t like standing in the middle of the room…I belong in the borders. That way I have the power to tell the story of that room.

In a nutshell, I am an entomophagist,   edible insects enthusiast, discoverer, educational technology adherent, ardent reader,   passionate open and connected educator. I tweet a lot @jkinyuru and I blog about edible insects, technology, people and things.

I hold a PhD in Food Science and Nutrition (JKUAT) and a postgraduate diploma in Educational Technology (Cape Town). I am a lecturer of Foods and Nutrition at the Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology in Kenya; an educator and a researcher with interests in Food and Nutrition with special enthusiasm in Educational Technology. However, am I an authority on any of these things? Hardly. But I have an opinion. And I prefer to share it!

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Edible Insects Market Growth Factor Analysis by Manufacturers, Shares, Size, Trends and Challenges with Forecast to 2021 | Green Mountain Outlook

Edible Insects Market Growth Factor Analysis by Manufacturers, Shares, Size, Trends and Challenges with Forecast to 2021 | Green Mountain Outlook | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible Insects Market is expected to witness growth of international market with respect to advancements and innovations including development history, competitive analysis and regional development forecast.

The global Edible Insects market is valued at USD XX million in 2017 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022.

Edible Insects market analysis of the Industry drivers and restraints, key trends from the supply and demand side, which are operating the Edible Insects market.

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News: Register for the Edible Insect Event at Wageningen University & reminder Insect Production Course at HAS Den Bosch

News: Register for the Edible Insect Event at Wageningen University & reminder Insect Production Course at HAS Den Bosch | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
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Meet the Scientists Who Are Making Bread with Cockroach Flour

Meet the Scientists Who Are Making Bread with Cockroach Flour | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Two scientists from the Federal University of Rio Grande, in Brazil, have developed a flour made of cockroaches that contains 40 percent more protein than the normal wheat flour.

It's time to start looking at cockroaches differently, as you may find them in your food very soon—not walking over your leftovers, but mixed into everyday dishes.

Two scientists from the Federal University of Rio Grande in Brazil have developed a flour made of cockroaches that contains 40 percent more protein than normal wheat flour.

Food engineering students Andressa Lucas and Lauren Menegon discovered a new way of producing cheaper yet still nutritious food with the cockroach flour, since it contains a large amount of essential amino acids and some lipids and fatty acids as well—the keys for a balanced and healthy human diet.

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Silkworms! (I&W launch party – part 2 of 7) – Insects and wine!

Silkworms! (I&W launch party – part 2 of 7) – Insects and wine! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I must admit, until this fateful evening, I had not been the greatest fan of the silkworm pupae. Not only are they actually caterpillars and not worms, they come with a very distinct, lingering aftertaste, which I have never associated with pleasure or joy.

But I was pleasantly surprised upon trying them in combination with the wines, particularly the Andert Rulander. A gentle sip of it would immediately wash away the the mournful aftertaste like a fresh Austrian breeze. Furthermore, the pupae’s rich flavours (contained in the chewy ooze released after the initial satisfying crunch, mmm…) perfectly complemented and enhanced the smokey, yet soothing taste of the delightful orange wine. That’s right, all of this right in your mouth and without a catch. It was as though the silkworm had finally found its long lost friend.
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Dare to Eat Insects | Jakob Lewin Rukov | TEDxEBS

Published on Mar 9, 2017
Jakob Rukov explains why edible insects constitute a solution to many of the worlds food supply problems, and the challenges (and possible solutions) on how to nudge people in industrialized countries toward including insects in their culinary repertoire. This talk also gives insight of the life of an edible insect enthusiast.

Jakob is the co-founder of Bugging Denmark, Denmark’s only edible cricket farm situated in Copenhagen, and Insekt KBH, Europe’s only producer of juice products containing edible insects. Together with his partners, he strives to introduce insects to Europe in a gentle and tasty way.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx
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Crickets! (I&W Launch party – part 1 of 7..) – Insects and wine!

Crickets! (I&W Launch party – part 1 of 7..) – Insects and wine! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
26TH MARCH 2017 BY CHARLOTTE PAYNE
Crickets! (I&W Launch party – part 1 of 7..)
We’ve got seven peoples’ take on seven insects&wine pairings, to celebrate our launch, and we’re going to publish them daily over the next few days. Enjoy!

We’re going to travel backwards through the menu, and we begin with the most accessible insect to those living in Europe or the USA. Recipe & purchasing notes to follow!

Insect #7, from Alex:
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The GATEWAY BUG Banquet

The GATEWAY BUG Banquet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

THE GATEWAY BUG BANQUET with celebrity chef Andrew Zimmern and the filmmakers.
Over 2 billion people in 80% of the world’s countries consume insects as part of their daily diet. Following the rise and fall of the edible insect industry in America, award winning feature documentary The Gateway Bug explores America’s disconnect with food as climate catastrophe and shares how changing daily eating habits can feed humanity in an uncertain age.
Following the April 22nd premiere of The Gateway Bug at this year's Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival, please join us for this exclusive dining experience featuring a 4-course insect tasting menu paired with wine courtesy of Tradition Wine and Spirits. Insects generously provided by Entomo Farms. In attendance will be stars from the film including celebrity chef Andrew Zimmern, Kevin Bachhuber, Daniella Martin and the filmmakers, Johanna B. Kelly and Cameron Marshad.

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7 Must-See Films Inspiring a Healthier Planet

7 Must-See Films Inspiring a Healthier Planet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

6. Bugs

In recent years the United Nations has suggested that, due to a growing population, we may find ourselves dealing with a food shortage sooner than we think. One of their recommendations: edible insects. Championed by cooks for their unique flavors, and embraced by environmentalists for their small ecological impact, creepy crawlers are being hailed as the miracle cure.

In Bugs, director Andreas Johnsen teams up with researchers and chefs from Copenhagen's Nordic Food Lab to determine whether or not that's the case. Traveling to such places as Mexico, Australia, Kenya, and Japan, they encounter communities where such delicacies as grasshoppers, termite queens, and venomous hornets are eaten. That may sound unappetizing, but the film's expert chefs transform these gooey creatures into beautiful, great tasting dishes.

Along the way, however, the filmmakers discover a number of things that could dampen the U.N.'s perfect plan. They also learn the food dilemma is less about population growth and more about unfair distribution and corporate greed. This colorful documentary is powerful in its message while allowing for some incredibly fun moments
as well.

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Bugs for grub

Bugs for grub | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Protein replacement


In Central India, indigenous tribes make up for the lack of protein in their diet by eating ants and crickets. They make a chutney by pounding together ants, garlic, ginger and chilli.

Ants are a delicacy in Brazil too; especially the winged variety that flies out in plenty in the months of October and November — these are females who are sent out to create new ant colonies. Their stomachs are full of nutrients, and that is what makes them additionally appealing to many as a food source. The wings are removed, and the insect is fried, roasted or dipped in chocolate! Rural Japanese have survived rough agricultural and economic conditions by eating insects. Now, many restaurants flaunt bugs and insects on their menu.

A sign of daredevilry?


A reason why the vast majority looks unkindly at eating insects is possibly because of the taboo associated with them. In many Western countries, the idea of entomophagy has still not been embraced. Bug eating is largely limited to TV reality shows, and there too as a dare and a sign of bravery. But, scientists
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Cambridge Butterfly Conservatory - BugFeast

Cambridge Butterfly Conservatory - BugFeast | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Why Eat Insects?
For starters, they're nutritious!
Eating insects, also called entomophagy, is more common than you may think. Insects have served as a food source for people for tens of thousands of years. Although less popular in North america, insects remain a popular food in many developing regions of Central and South America, Africa, and Asia. It is estimated that there are 1,417 species of insects and arachnids that are eaten by humans on a regular basis.
People across the globe eat insects because they are very nutritious and readily available. Insects can be a good source of not only protein, but also vitamins, minerals, and fats. For example, crickets are high in calcium, and termites are rich in iron. One hundred grams of giant silkworm moth larvae provide 100 percent of the daily requirements for copper, zinc, iron, thiamin, and riboflavin.
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The joy of insects: why bugs are an athlete's best friend

The joy of insects: why bugs are an athlete's best friend | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The former rugby player set about transforming his body in 2013, dropping from 24 per cent body fat to nine per cent via a stringent 11-month programme that saw him consume up to six portions of protein every day to help his muscles recover after gym sessions. Wary of red meat's hormone content, Leach turned to insects - a food he first tried while travelling through Zambia.
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His love for edible insects knew no bounds – Tribute to Prof. Alan Yen

His love for edible insects knew no bounds – Tribute to Prof. Alan Yen | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The good Professor of Invertebrate Sciences at La Trobe University, Australia, passed away on Monday 20th March 2017. For several months Alan has fought hard, but unfortunately lost the battle with cancer. Alan was like the gigantic baobab tree that birds and animals lived on. He had these massive branches where people and even governments (he was Australian government advisor on something) hung on, and his roots went so deep and wide, voyaging seas and oceans…exuding the sap of scientific ingenuity and valor even to the dustiest places of sub-Saharan Africa.  But death is death. And Alan has slept.
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GrubTubs joins the Tarmac TX 2017 Cohort and 3M to integrate social and tech

GrubTubs joins the Tarmac TX 2017 Cohort and 3M to integrate social and tech | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Generate positive impact with Tarmac TX
Tarmac TX, in partnership with 3M and CALSO, is a one-of-a-kind accelerator for technology startups developing a product or service addressing some of the most pressing social and environmental challenges of our times. Based in Austin, TX, their 9-month program offers selected startups free support services, including a co-working space, events & workshops, mentorship and networking opportunities in both the Tech and the Social ecosystems.

GrubTubs partnering with 3M has broad applications for redifining food safety for both city waste streams and farms.
As GrubTubs aims to support family farms by making feed affordable, there is a real opportunity to change how cities deal with food and food waste. Especially if you recognize that 3M is a partner with Tarmac TX and 3M has a tremendous expertice in wireless tracking, microbial detection, food safety and sensor technology. All of those components are crucial to make the next generation of GrubTubs that deliver safe food/feed to urban farms.
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News: Register for the Edible Insect Event at Wageningen University & reminder Insect Production Course at HAS Den Bosch

News: Register for the Edible Insect Event at Wageningen University & reminder Insect Production Course at HAS Den Bosch | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The new date for the Edible Insect Seminar & Workshop is available! 
The next Edible Insect Seminar & Workshop will be held in Wageningen on June 8th and 9th 2017. Like previous events, the first day will consist of lectures with state of the art information will be shared with you about the insect production & processing. News fresh from the latest research will be presented.
The second day is about you and your plans. The content of this day is about networking, collaboration and funding projects. You can present yourself, your business and/or projects you are involved in or pitch you ideas. If you are up to find partners, you will have networking opportunities and there will be a workshop on the financial aspects of the insect business.
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Newport teachers will eat insects to fight malaria

Newport teachers will eat insects to fight malaria | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

EDIBLE insects will be on the menu when teachers at a Newport school take on an eating challenge to raise money for charity.

Pest control company Rentokil Initial UK will be visiting Lliswerry High School , Newport, on April 4 as part of its school tour across the UK.

As part of the tour the firm's 'Pestaurant' gives people a chance to try a range of ready-to-eat insects, like plain-roasted locusts and curry crickets. 

The Pestaurant team also share interesting facts about insect eating, as well as discussing why insects can provide a viable and sustainable food source.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Teachers at the school, which also supports the MNMUK charity, will be taking on an eating challenge at lunchtime to raise extra cash.

The Pestaurant team will bring some large edible insects for those brave enough.

Those watching will be encouraged to donate a minimum of 50p to raise money for the charity working to prevent the spread of malaria.

Phill Wood, managing director at Rentokil Initial, said: “As a global leader in pest control and washroom hygiene, Malaria No More UK is an important organisation for Rentokil Initial to support."

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Thai Bugs to the World

Published on Mar 16, 2017
Bug eating from Thailand to the rest of the world. Featuring Bugsolutely Cricket Pasta and much more. On NHK WORLD, the international channel of the japanese NHK (in English)
Category

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Eating bugs: A traveler's guide

Eating bugs: A traveler's guide | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
(CNN)According to a recent U.N. report, insects could be a solution to some of the world's food and health problems. They're nutritious, eco-friendly and abundant. Many countries already consider them a staple part of their diets.

So if we're all to start consuming locusts and scorpions, we can start in Southeast Asia for guidance.
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Insect-eating might be the latest food trend. Would you try it?

Insect-eating might be the latest food trend. Would you try it? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
According to a recent news report, insects are heading to Canadian grocery shelves. It’s not an attack of killer ants or an infestation of locusts; rather these insects are of the edible variety destined to be sold for consumption.

You may have just said “ick”, but for some years now environmentalists and foodies have hailed bugs as the future of eco-friendly protein. Sustaining the environment while trying to feed the over seven billion mouths on our planet has become increasingly challenging. As author Paul Roberts vividly explains in his book The End of Food, the existing system of making, marketing and moving food is failing because very year it is becoming less and less compatible with the growing population. While there is more high-volume and cheaply manufactured food than ever before, the quality of our milk, meat and crops has steadily declined. And the quality of soil and water used to produce this food has also been compromised. Also, consider the great paradox of the existing system: there are nearly one billion people in the world who are considered obese and another one billion who don’t get enough to eat.
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How A Cricket Farm in Austin Is Putting A Dent in World Hunger - Garden Collage

How A Cricket Farm in Austin Is Putting A Dent in World Hunger - Garden Collage | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Silence.
“Crickets are quiet when they’re babies,” explains Gabe Mott, one of the partners in Aspire, a food-grade cricket farm in Austin, Texas. Mott leads me from the nursery, where dense mats embedded with cricket eggs smaller than poppy seeds will hatch and become mobile within a week, to the room where a couple of thousand mature crickets already reside. These are the noisy guys and, in about a month, they’ll be on someone’s dinner plate.
Mott and partners, two of whom were named to last year’s Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list for social enterprise, may seem like they’re running a humble little cricket farm, but they’re really trying to make a dent in world hunger. Edible insects– eaten in places like Mexico, Africa and Thailand for millennia– are high in protein and eco-friendlier than any steak or chicken. Mott says everyone knows that now, though.
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Blog - Could insects be the future of food? - Yumpabar

Blog - Could insects be the future of food? - Yumpabar | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

More automated processes are being brought to the insect farming industry, so in the future it will hopefully be as cost effective to source from closer to the point of manufacture of our snack bars.

There are thousands of edible insects, each with their own unique flavour. In the West, cricket flour is the most commonly used insect ingredient. In Yumpa bars we use high quality cricket flour made from crickets fed on a diet of vegetables and grain. Finely ground cricket flour can be added to many dishes and has a savoury, nutty flavour with an umami finish. It fits well with both sweet and savoury food.  As consumers in the West become more familiar with the concept of insects as food, more and more options will become available to consumers in both shops and restaurants.

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Worldwide Edible Insects Market by Segment [Raw; Coated (Bars, Candy, Chocolate, Cookie, Chips, Crackers, Snack Packs); Powdered (Flour, Baking Powder, Protein Powder, Salts); Paste]: Market Size, ...

This 2016 Market Analysis and Forecasting Report on Edible Insects provides insights into key market requirements gathered from consumers, stores, retail outlets, and shops and their preferences, priorities and perception of commercially available edible insects. The study also covers key adoption factors such as user preferences on palate, tastes, age groups, consumption patterns, and coatings.

The Edible Insects market report provides an in-depth analysis on the market size and forecasts of the variety of segments of commercial available edible insects and bugs, including market opportunities across the globe.

The study also covers additional market forecast data on four segments within the edible insect ecosystem - Raw, Coated, Powdered and Paste. Further to this, the report also provides market data for sub-segments within the Coated and Powdered Edible Insect market - including bars, candy, chocolate, cookies, chips, crackers, snack packs, flours, baking powders, protein powders, salts and others.

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Dr. Afton Halloran at #ParabereForum 2017: When are edible insects sustainable?

Dr. Afton Halloran is a Canadian researcher at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen. She is a part of the GREEiNSECT research group (greeinsect.ku.dk), a group of public and private institutions investigating how insects can be utilized as a source of food and animal feed in Kenya.
Her research focuses on the socio-economic, nutritional, and environmental impacts of cricket farming in Thailand and Kenya. She formally worked as a consultant with the Insects for Food and Feed Programme at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome.
She is a co-author of the FAO’s most popular publication « Edible insects: future prospects for food and feed security ».
Afton holds a BSc (honours) in Global Resource Systems from the University of British Columbia, Canada and a MSc in Agricultural Development from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
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Future Food: 5 Weird Food Items We Could Be Eating in the Future

Future Food: 5 Weird Food Items We Could Be Eating in the Future | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
1. Bugs 

It would be incorrect to term bugs and insects as potential 'future food', as human beings have been consuming bugs since time immemorial. With the population on the rise, experts are predicting insects like crickets, grasshoppers and mealworms to be a regular affair on our dinner tables. And it makes complete sense too! These critters are abundant, high on protein and other nutrients, cheaper and much easier to farm than raising cattle or chickens. It is well known how in Asia, Africa and South America bugs are a prominent part of the culinary culture, but these critters are fast becoming popular in other parts of the world. The most recent development being the spike in sale of cricket flour from protein bars of Europe. 

Bug-eaters around the world are known as Entomophagists. Before you start shrinking your face in disgust, eating bugs is actually not all that bad. Entomophagists also claim that these insects actually taste pretty good. In a BBC video that went viral recently, actress Angelina Jolie was seen munching on crickets, scorpions and a bunch of these critters. Jolie was not only seen gorging on these creepy crawly critters, but was also seen feeding a host of them to her children, who happen to be big fans of the bugs too. This is because, when insects are cooked, they tend to absorb all spices, and can be made into crunchy chips.
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Saturday, May 6th | Edible Insect Cooking Class with Little Herds

Saturday, May 6th | Edible Insect Cooking Class with Little Herds | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
DETAILS
Curious how to incorporate more entomophagy (bug eating) into your life? Join Little Herds for a cooking demonstration at in.gredients! You'll learn how to cook bugs with Little Herds and a guest local chef. After your two hour cooking class, you'll get to take home ingredients to try your recipes for whomever you choose.

#austinfoodie#cooking#ingredientsATX#ingredients#entomophagy#edibleinsect#chef#austinweekend#cookingclass
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