Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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INSECTOS - COCINA DE OTRO MUNDO - Estampas

INSECTOS - COCINA DE OTRO MUNDO - Estampas | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

El chef venezolano Nelson Méndez busca acercarse al corazón de la gente con chupetas de araña mona, tequeños de gusano de moriche o potofeu de bagre tigre. Méndez, quien nació en Puerto Ayacucho, hijo de padre italiano y madre baré, se ha dedicado con fervor a difundir una gastronomía extrañísima, a la que ha ido incorporando técnicas, procedimientos e ingredientes de la cocina universal, pero que, de todos modos, sigue siendo rara

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Para aprender a preparar gusanos, arañas y demás especies, este chef viaja mucho al Amazonas, donde convive con los indígenas. A la araña, por ejemplo, cuya carne es parecida a la del cangrejo, hay que quemarla para quitarle los pelos; y también hay que aprender a extraerle el veneno. Al gusano de seje hay que darle el punto exacto de cocción porque, si no, se desvanece o se oxida. Todo se cocina directo en la candela y envuelto en hojas de plátano. Al final destaca un sabor ahumado."

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Ana Laura Pietrantuono's curator insight, August 5, 2013 7:32 PM

mmmm unas recetas muy interesantes!

 

Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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FFS 008 Edible Insects: the diet of tomorrow?

Published on Feb 22, 2017
This week, we discuss the exciting world of edible insects with Robert Nathan Allen from Little Herds.

Little Herds is an educational non-profit based in Austin, Texas teaching and spreading awareness about edible insects as a resource efficient, economically viable, nutritious and delicious food for us to eat, and as feed for the animal products that we consume.

We discuss the enormous potential of edible insects; how incorporating them into Western diets and food systems could help us meet the current and future nutritional and environmental demands and needs of a growing world population.

In this episode, you’ll hear all about:

what edible insects are
RNA’s love story with bugs
The historical and cultural significance of edible insects across societies and cultures
Western taboos towards insects and how we can overcome them
first impressions and how they taste as I try them live on air!
the nutritional benefits of edible insects compared to other livestock
the resource efficiency of edible insects (feed conversion ratio, land and water use)
the ethical argument for eating insects
insects as feed for our livestock
criticisms and concerns about edible insects
RNA’s tips, tricks and suggestions about edible insects
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The GATEWAY BUG Banquet

The GATEWAY BUG Banquet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

THE GATEWAY BUG BANQUET with celebrity chef Andrew Zimmern and the filmmakers.
Over 2 billion people in 80% of the world’s countries consume insects as part of their daily diet. Following the rise and fall of the edible insect industry in America, award winning feature documentary The Gateway Bug explores America’s disconnect with food as climate catastrophe and shares how changing daily eating habits can feed humanity in an uncertain age.
Following the April 22nd premiere of The Gateway Bug at this year's Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival, please join us for this exclusive dining experience featuring a 4-course insect tasting menu paired with wine courtesy of Tradition Wine and Spirits. Insects generously provided by Entomo Farms. In attendance will be stars from the film including celebrity chef Andrew Zimmern, Kevin Bachhuber, Daniella Martin and the filmmakers, Johanna B. Kelly and Cameron Marshad.

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7 Must-See Films Inspiring a Healthier Planet

7 Must-See Films Inspiring a Healthier Planet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

6. Bugs

In recent years the United Nations has suggested that, due to a growing population, we may find ourselves dealing with a food shortage sooner than we think. One of their recommendations: edible insects. Championed by cooks for their unique flavors, and embraced by environmentalists for their small ecological impact, creepy crawlers are being hailed as the miracle cure.

In Bugs, director Andreas Johnsen teams up with researchers and chefs from Copenhagen's Nordic Food Lab to determine whether or not that's the case. Traveling to such places as Mexico, Australia, Kenya, and Japan, they encounter communities where such delicacies as grasshoppers, termite queens, and venomous hornets are eaten. That may sound unappetizing, but the film's expert chefs transform these gooey creatures into beautiful, great tasting dishes.

Along the way, however, the filmmakers discover a number of things that could dampen the U.N.'s perfect plan. They also learn the food dilemma is less about population growth and more about unfair distribution and corporate greed. This colorful documentary is powerful in its message while allowing for some incredibly fun moments
as well.

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Bugs for grub

Bugs for grub | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Protein replacement


In Central India, indigenous tribes make up for the lack of protein in their diet by eating ants and crickets. They make a chutney by pounding together ants, garlic, ginger and chilli.

Ants are a delicacy in Brazil too; especially the winged variety that flies out in plenty in the months of October and November — these are females who are sent out to create new ant colonies. Their stomachs are full of nutrients, and that is what makes them additionally appealing to many as a food source. The wings are removed, and the insect is fried, roasted or dipped in chocolate! Rural Japanese have survived rough agricultural and economic conditions by eating insects. Now, many restaurants flaunt bugs and insects on their menu.

A sign of daredevilry?


A reason why the vast majority looks unkindly at eating insects is possibly because of the taboo associated with them. In many Western countries, the idea of entomophagy has still not been embraced. Bug eating is largely limited to TV reality shows, and there too as a dare and a sign of bravery. But, scientists
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Cambridge Butterfly Conservatory - BugFeast

Cambridge Butterfly Conservatory - BugFeast | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Why Eat Insects?
For starters, they're nutritious!
Eating insects, also called entomophagy, is more common than you may think. Insects have served as a food source for people for tens of thousands of years. Although less popular in North america, insects remain a popular food in many developing regions of Central and South America, Africa, and Asia. It is estimated that there are 1,417 species of insects and arachnids that are eaten by humans on a regular basis.
People across the globe eat insects because they are very nutritious and readily available. Insects can be a good source of not only protein, but also vitamins, minerals, and fats. For example, crickets are high in calcium, and termites are rich in iron. One hundred grams of giant silkworm moth larvae provide 100 percent of the daily requirements for copper, zinc, iron, thiamin, and riboflavin.
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The joy of insects: why bugs are an athlete's best friend

The joy of insects: why bugs are an athlete's best friend | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The former rugby player set about transforming his body in 2013, dropping from 24 per cent body fat to nine per cent via a stringent 11-month programme that saw him consume up to six portions of protein every day to help his muscles recover after gym sessions. Wary of red meat's hormone content, Leach turned to insects - a food he first tried while travelling through Zambia.
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Mexico's ubiquitous bugs: you can eat them or ride in them

Mexico's ubiquitous bugs: you can eat them or ride in them | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Mexicans have developed a taste for these things. Eating bugs is part of their pre-Hispanic, indigenous heritage. Their food source developed long before the time that sheep, cows, goats and other four-legged animals were introduced from Spain.

In Mesoamerica, eating closer to the food chain became an essential part of survival and protein consumption. The tradition continues today and I think of it as part Mexico’s cultural heritage. No one here is squeamish when a bug arrives at table.

Which is why I thought it was about time I tasted escamoles, chicatanas and gusanos. I became a fan of chapulines a few years ago. Ah, you may be saying, what IS she eating? On the menus of upscale restaurants, the dishes are translated from Spanish to English, though most have a Nahuatl origin.
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Insects in feed or food? 

Insects in feed or food?  | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Insects in feed or food?

Should we eat insects or feed our animals?
Could insects be useful in (veterinary) medicine?
What can we learn from Southern countries?
Are insect-derived products safe?

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This Swiss Restaurant Is Offering an Insect Cooking Class

This Swiss Restaurant Is Offering an Insect Cooking Class | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
For those who are tired of the usual coq au vin and tiramisu of cooking classes, a restaurant in Switzerland is offering a new experience for travelers interested in a more experimental side of the culinary arts.

The Löscher restaurant in Bern is offering cooking classes that use insects as a primary ingredient, The Local reported.
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IPIFF Insect producers outline key priorities on the EU animal feed and food legislations and announce a major conference to be held at the end of 2017. Press Release - March Edition

IPIFF Insect producers outline key priorities on the EU animal feed and food legislations and announce a major conference to be held at the end of 2017. Press Release - March Edition | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Brussels, 16 March 2017
 
At its General Assembly meeting held on 15 March, IPIFF - the European Umbrella Organisation representing the interests of Insect Producers for Food and Feed – outlined its policy priorities for 2017 and beyond.

In the wake of the green light given by EU Member States on the use of insect proteins as fish feed in Europe, IPIFF commits to assist insect producers in the implementation of the legislation, which will apply as from 1st July 2017.  

IPIFF is notably engaged, in the development of a guidance paper documenting best practice in quality and hygienic insect production. The completion of the project is forecasted by the end of 2017.
 
Looking ahead, IPIFF is also considering options for extending regulatory opportunities on the use of insect as animal feed. More specifically, IPIFF members believe that, on the middle term period, insects could be an important addition in feed for poultry and pig species.

Furthermore, EU insect producers recognize the potential for insects to offer recycling solutions for certain residues originating from the agri-food chain. Against this background, IPIFF pleads for expanding scientific investigations on the safe use of a few ‘high-grade’ substrates that are currently not authorised as feedstock for insects in Europe: these include for instance: former foodstuffs containing meat and fish and, catering waste. Their authorisation as feed for insects could be envisaged in the future, if the European Food Safety Authority assures that these do not entail safety risks.  
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Are Cricket Bars the Next Big Thing? Grab These 5 Weird Food Products Now

Are Cricket Bars the Next Big Thing? Grab These 5 Weird Food Products Now | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Yes, insect eating is trying to go mainstream in America, but if you're not ready to dig into a crunchy cricket quite yet, dip your toe in the bug-ingesting pool with a protein bar made with cricket flour. The bars' creators (friends from Brown University who launched their company via Kickstarter) claim that crickets are not only a complete protein that contain all the essential amino acids, but are also better for the environment, producing 100 times less greenhouse gases than cows. Flavors range from PB&J to banana bread; and no, you can't taste any actual crickets when you take a bite.
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Call for Abstracts - Insects in feed or food Conference

Call for Abstracts - Insects in feed or food Conference | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
All participants are invited to submit their abstracts and indicate their preference for oral or poster presentation. The deadline for submission of the abstract is May 31, 2017. Only abstracts submitted using the online application will be considered for publication. Abstracts are required in English. The guidelines are those of Journal of Insects as Food and Feed. Abstracts should contain the specific objectives, experimental methods and statistical analyses used, together with a synthesis of the results and conclusions. Please read the instructions very carefully, while submitting your abstract

Authors will be informed by July 31,2017 whether their abstracts have been accepted for the program. Authors who submit abstracts but fail to register for the Conference by September, 1 2017 will have their presentations removed from the program and their abstracts will not be inserted in the Abstract Book /CD. Upon acceptance, they will be published in a supplement of the ‘Journal of Insects as Food and Feed’.
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TRENDS REPORT 2016: DECODING THE FUTURE OF FOOD

TRENDS REPORT 2016: DECODING THE FUTURE OF FOOD | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Have you ever considered having crickets for lunch? Would you grab a Soylent bottle instead of a sandwich when your are in a rush or eating at the office? Or have your dreamed of ordering your food through an intelligent voice system from your car? What about having it delivered by a drone?

It might sound like sci-fi for some people, but this is the future of food and it is happening now. Insect and vegetable protein meat-alike, food printers, robots or drone delivery are no longer far from reality.

At Reimagine Food we have analyzed and dissected the most relevant trends in food industry for this year.
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How A Cricket Farm in Austin Is Putting A Dent in World Hunger - Garden Collage

How A Cricket Farm in Austin Is Putting A Dent in World Hunger - Garden Collage | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Silence.
“Crickets are quiet when they’re babies,” explains Gabe Mott, one of the partners in Aspire, a food-grade cricket farm in Austin, Texas. Mott leads me from the nursery, where dense mats embedded with cricket eggs smaller than poppy seeds will hatch and become mobile within a week, to the room where a couple of thousand mature crickets already reside. These are the noisy guys and, in about a month, they’ll be on someone’s dinner plate.
Mott and partners, two of whom were named to last year’s Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list for social enterprise, may seem like they’re running a humble little cricket farm, but they’re really trying to make a dent in world hunger. Edible insects– eaten in places like Mexico, Africa and Thailand for millennia– are high in protein and eco-friendlier than any steak or chicken. Mott says everyone knows that now, though.
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Blog - Could insects be the future of food? - Yumpabar

Blog - Could insects be the future of food? - Yumpabar | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

More automated processes are being brought to the insect farming industry, so in the future it will hopefully be as cost effective to source from closer to the point of manufacture of our snack bars.

There are thousands of edible insects, each with their own unique flavour. In the West, cricket flour is the most commonly used insect ingredient. In Yumpa bars we use high quality cricket flour made from crickets fed on a diet of vegetables and grain. Finely ground cricket flour can be added to many dishes and has a savoury, nutty flavour with an umami finish. It fits well with both sweet and savoury food.  As consumers in the West become more familiar with the concept of insects as food, more and more options will become available to consumers in both shops and restaurants.

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Worldwide Edible Insects Market by Segment [Raw; Coated (Bars, Candy, Chocolate, Cookie, Chips, Crackers, Snack Packs); Powdered (Flour, Baking Powder, Protein Powder, Salts); Paste]: Market Size, ...

This 2016 Market Analysis and Forecasting Report on Edible Insects provides insights into key market requirements gathered from consumers, stores, retail outlets, and shops and their preferences, priorities and perception of commercially available edible insects. The study also covers key adoption factors such as user preferences on palate, tastes, age groups, consumption patterns, and coatings.

The Edible Insects market report provides an in-depth analysis on the market size and forecasts of the variety of segments of commercial available edible insects and bugs, including market opportunities across the globe.

The study also covers additional market forecast data on four segments within the edible insect ecosystem - Raw, Coated, Powdered and Paste. Further to this, the report also provides market data for sub-segments within the Coated and Powdered Edible Insect market - including bars, candy, chocolate, cookies, chips, crackers, snack packs, flours, baking powders, protein powders, salts and others.

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Dr. Afton Halloran at #ParabereForum 2017: When are edible insects sustainable?

Dr. Afton Halloran is a Canadian researcher at the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen. She is a part of the GREEiNSECT research group (greeinsect.ku.dk), a group of public and private institutions investigating how insects can be utilized as a source of food and animal feed in Kenya.
Her research focuses on the socio-economic, nutritional, and environmental impacts of cricket farming in Thailand and Kenya. She formally worked as a consultant with the Insects for Food and Feed Programme at the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in Rome.
She is a co-author of the FAO’s most popular publication « Edible insects: future prospects for food and feed security ».
Afton holds a BSc (honours) in Global Resource Systems from the University of British Columbia, Canada and a MSc in Agricultural Development from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
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Future Food: 5 Weird Food Items We Could Be Eating in the Future

Future Food: 5 Weird Food Items We Could Be Eating in the Future | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
1. Bugs 

It would be incorrect to term bugs and insects as potential 'future food', as human beings have been consuming bugs since time immemorial. With the population on the rise, experts are predicting insects like crickets, grasshoppers and mealworms to be a regular affair on our dinner tables. And it makes complete sense too! These critters are abundant, high on protein and other nutrients, cheaper and much easier to farm than raising cattle or chickens. It is well known how in Asia, Africa and South America bugs are a prominent part of the culinary culture, but these critters are fast becoming popular in other parts of the world. The most recent development being the spike in sale of cricket flour from protein bars of Europe. 

Bug-eaters around the world are known as Entomophagists. Before you start shrinking your face in disgust, eating bugs is actually not all that bad. Entomophagists also claim that these insects actually taste pretty good. In a BBC video that went viral recently, actress Angelina Jolie was seen munching on crickets, scorpions and a bunch of these critters. Jolie was not only seen gorging on these creepy crawly critters, but was also seen feeding a host of them to her children, who happen to be big fans of the bugs too. This is because, when insects are cooked, they tend to absorb all spices, and can be made into crunchy chips.
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Saturday, May 6th | Edible Insect Cooking Class with Little Herds

Saturday, May 6th | Edible Insect Cooking Class with Little Herds | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
DETAILS
Curious how to incorporate more entomophagy (bug eating) into your life? Join Little Herds for a cooking demonstration at in.gredients! You'll learn how to cook bugs with Little Herds and a guest local chef. After your two hour cooking class, you'll get to take home ingredients to try your recipes for whomever you choose.

#austinfoodie#cooking#ingredientsATX#ingredients#entomophagy#edibleinsect#chef#austinweekend#cookingclass
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"Making the unwanted (insects) desirable"

"Making the unwanted (insects) desirable" | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Love them or hate them, edible insects offer one of the best solutions to growing global problems. The looming food shortage, growing protein demand and environmental issues mean we must change the way we produce and consumer food. Naturally high in protein and requiring limited resources to grow, insects are a highly viable solution!

But the current reality is, the edible insects faces many barriers. Regulation, production scale-up and consumer demand are key obstacles for insects. How can we find new ways to grow demand? How can we transform the barriers for insects into new business opportunities? And make insects truly desirable...something consumers and industry really want?

This course is aimed at helping businesses, food industry individuals and entrepreneurs to harness the business potential of edible insects, while learning how to effectively sell new, sustainable foods and ingredients.
Ana C. Day's insight:

WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR?

  • Food industry companies and individuals who want to explore and understand the opportunity of edible insects, and learn how to sell new sustainable foods and ingredients with insects as a case example.
  • Entrepreneurs and start-up companies who want to learn new approaches to overcome the current challenges to build successful insects businesses - while also learning new tools & techniques to effectively sell insects in food.
  • Research companies involved in developing the industry for edible insects
  • Anyone interested in edible insects as a solution to global health, sustainability and food production issues!

WHAT CAN YOU EXPECT FROM THE COURSE?

We believe in empowering others on their journey to create Better Business. That's why this course is not just educational, but includes hands-on activities to help you develop new skills and tools. From this course, you can expect to - 

 

  • Validate the vast potential and business opportunity of edible insects 
  • Gain new insights on the wider opportunity of insects, beyond only protein
  • Gain a deep understanding and.................
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six Legged Meat: Insects As Eco-Friendly Meat (VIDEO)

six Legged Meat: Insects As Eco-Friendly Meat (VIDEO) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Methane from cattle farming is more noxious in terms of global warming than the CO2 produced by all the world’s cars. A team of scientists in Netherlands is investigating the nutritional and eco-friendly potential of insects to replace protein yielded by livestock.
A video report by Al Jazeera English on insects as eco-friendly meat.
Ana C. Day's insight:
Healthy Nutrition Conference

29 June 2017Villa Flora, Brightlands Campus Greenport VenloThe Netherlands

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Agriculture will feed the future

Agriculture will feed the future | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

While a UN report says agriculture has to produce 70 percent more food in 2050 than it did in 2006 to feed the world’s growing population, South Korea’s state-run agricultural think tank is busy experimenting how to turn agriculture into something like manufacturing to feed the future generations.

Located in Wanju, North Jeolla Province, the National Institute of Agricultural Science operates a smart greenhouse to experiment vertical farming, researches on insect farming and preserves tens of thousands of seeds in preparation for international disputes over patented plants.

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Jerome TOUVERON's curator insight, March 22, 8:45 AM
Vertical farming experimenting in South Korea...
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Thai Bugs to the World - NHK WORLD

Thai Bugs to the World - NHK WORLD | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A plate of insects may put off many diners but in Thailand, they have long been a valuable source of nutrition -- and insects could soon land on more menus.

Deep fried insects are a popular Thai street food. They're cheap and nutritious. The UN food agency reports they contain high quality protein and vitamins, and could be a solution for global food security.

The study has been welcomed by some Europeans, who believe in the potential of insects as food. This confectionery is made from bamboo worms and crickets.

"In France, in my country, a Michelin-starred restaurant started to use insects because of new flavors, something new that nobody knows," says Willy Daurade, of Le Cordon Bleu Dusit Culinary School.

Thai insect farmers see an opportunity for future exports. At one of the 20,000 cricket farms in Thailand, the staff is raising crickets for sale in Thailand and abroad.

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Microwave drying insect

Microwave drying insect | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Yellow powder insect is also called as mealworms or fly maggots. There is rich nutrition in the mealworm including 30% fat, 50% protein, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, iron and other microelement. Even the drying mealworm still contains 40% protein and other microelements as a wonderful feed.

 
Therefore, many farmers take the mealworm as  feeds for gold fish, tropical fish, bird, parrot, snake, turtle, centipede and other pets. The drying mealworm dramatically improves animal growing rate, rate of survive, disease-resistance, reproductive capacity.
 
Why we choose microwave drying equipment for insect?

1. MAX 2450MHz Powerful microwave equipment dramatically decreases the drying time and handy controls the condition of mealworm.
 
2. Comparing to traditional drying method, the microwave drying dehumidify the insects with good looking ,straight shape, original color and fresh. Only is the some liquid extracted
 
3. Microwave work as a radio frequency preserve the nutrition elements, mainly sterilize bacteria of mealworm to increase expiration date
 
4. MAX microwave drying system could continuously work for 24/7 with fully automatic conveyor and drying method. It could process large amount of material in few hours to dramatically improve the drying capacity.

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The food of the future is hopping, flying and crawling in your backyard right now

The food of the future is hopping, flying and crawling in your backyard right now | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
One of Wellington's top chefs has made a flying visit to New Plymouth to demonstrate just how delicious a future of bug eating will be.

His dish of the day was a pork bun, except the pork was replaced with mealworms and garnished with crickets, grasshoppers and ants. 

The chef, Jacob Brown of the Larder restaurant in Wellington, was cooking as part of the Bugs! Our Background Heroes exhibition at Puke Ariki museum on Sunday.
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10 ways Noma changed the world of food

10 ways Noma changed the world of food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Insects
The British press were shocked and surprised when Noma popped up in London and served up live ants in 2012.
Ants were on the Noma menu to the last -- a week before the restaurant closed, a slightly crunchy coin of wood ants (dead this time) provided the citrus note to the birch ice cream dessert. They also appeared earlier in the menu, sprinkled over some "leaves."
There's been much talk of insects replacing meat as protein in recent years and despite the uproar about its plausibility in the Western world, it has quietly arrived on the menu at some of the more avant-garde restaurants.
In London, wood ants are used for flavor at Nordic Asian restaurant Flat Three (120-122 Holland Park Avenue, London; +44 207 792 8987)
The insect movement continued via the Nordic Food Lab, a not-for-profit research hub that Redzepi launched in 2008.
One of its past projects was recipes featuring insects, the result of which will appear in a forthcoming cookbook.
But perhaps more importantly, the research focuses on food from the Nordic region, which can only mean a stronger regional culinary identity in the future.

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