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Les insectes passent à table !

Les insectes passent à table ! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Le monde des insectes est d?une incroyable diversité. Et ces insectes passent en ce moment à table au Cabinet d?Histoire du Jardin des Plantes à Paris. Les plus beaux spécimens du Muséum National d?Histoire Naturelle sont exposés jusqu?
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento

Is FAO turning its back on Edible Insects?: FAO’s Senior Forestry Officer Paul Vantomme retires! - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Who doesn´t know Paul? The man behind Edible Insects to whom we look for advise and support! A personality in his own right, who has managed to create an amalgam between industry and academia, always making sure the sector will get to move forward. Well, after 25 years of FAO service, our guiding star takes his well-deserved retirement February 1st and I want to invite you to take two minutes to let him know how much his support and knowledge meant to you and your business or project over these years !! Thanks Paul for your #edibleinsect knowledge and support[...]
Ana C. Day's insight:

WHO IS GOING TO REPLACE Mr. Vantomme? Who will be our Ento-Godfather, our glue?

It is my understanding that, so far, nobody has been nominated by his director, Eva Muller (eva.muller@fao.org), to replace him. Is his post at FAO being abolished? In any case, who will look out for the maintenance of any of his previous activities now that he is gone? What about further updates on the webpage Directory, legal studies, networking, projects, meetings and so on?? And it gets worse…! The word INSECTS does not even appear in the official FAO workplans for the years 2016/17 !

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My search for insects that would feed the world (2)

My search for insects that would feed the world (2) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I kept roaming the vast Expo area in Milan – all those impressive national pavilions showing how the respective countries were “feeding the planet”, as the Universal Exhibition’s theme suggested. Yet all the nations that regularly eat insects – they had somehow decided to hide to the world the fact that they do.
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Does this bug you? When your food crawls... | Lexology

Does this bug you? When your food crawls... | Lexology | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In many countries, the consumption of insects is widely accepted. However in the Western world, edible insects are not a popular feature on many people’s menus or shopping lists – yet.

Cricket-chip cookies, Bee-LT sandwiches and grasshopper kebabs. As weird as these delicacies sound, there is no denying that there has been a spike of interest in enjoying insects for dinner. But what patenting implications do food businesses have to consider?
Ana C. Day's insight:

"For the purposes of this article, we have focused our review of the patent landscape on the use of insects, or products of their processing, for human consumption.The majority of patent applicants in this area are from China, followed by the US, with some from Japan, France, the Netherlands and Russia.

Wageningen University in the Netherlands also appears to have a focus on research into the area of edible insects. While individuals own most patent applications, Protix (based in the Netherlands) is one of the few companies that have a number of patent families in the area of edible insects more generally, including a number of patent applications directed to systems for breeding insects.

Inventions relating to the use of insects for human consumption, including products of their processing, involve either converting insects into nutrient-rich extracts, or using live insects as food sources, particularly as part of a self-sustaining food production system. The patent applications in the former category include those that cover: processes for obtaining fat-, protein- and fibre-containing fractions from insects; methods of obtaining pre-seasoned and fried insect larvae to be added to food as a fortifier; pre-prepared cicada-derived food additives to boost the nutritional content of, and to impart certain medicinal properties to, food; and a production method for a milk substitute (which does not contain lactose) derived from insect larvae."

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Jimini's : quand les insectes comestibles s'invitent à l'apéro !

Jimini's : quand les insectes comestibles s'invitent à l'apéro ! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Jimini's, c'est la marque d'insectes comestibles pour l'apéro créée par Bastien et Clément, deux jeunes entrepreneurs. 
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Avec les insectes comestibles, fini le saucisson bien gras, les chips huileuses et les cacahuètes trop salées ! Désormais, criquets et vers sont les rois de l’apéro. Parce qu’ils sont naturels, riches en protéines, pauvres en matières grasses et pleins de vitamines, Clément Scellier et Bastien Rabastens ont décidé de les assaisonner. 


Alors que l’entomophagie  (la consommation d’insectes par l’homme) se démocratise de plus en plus en France, Clément et Bastien créent dès 2012 Jimini’s, leur propre marque d’insectes comestibles

Rencontre avec Clément à qui l’on a posé quelques questions au sujet de Jimini’s, du parcours du jeune duo et de leurs projets."

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Next EntoCall | EntoCall

Next EntoCall | EntoCall | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Proudly brought to you by the Woven Network

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Paul Rozin attended the University of Chicago,receiving an A.B in 1956, then received a PhD in both Biology and Psychology from Harvard, in 1961.  Dr. Rozin has studied the psychological significance of flavorings placed on foods in different cuisines, the cultural evolution of cuisine, the development of food aversions, the development of food preferences, family influences in preference development, and attitudes to meat.  Most recently, major foci of attention have been the emotion of disgust, the entry of food issues into the moral domain in modern American culture, French-American differences in the food domain, attitudes to recycled water, and entomophagy.   – text adapted from a University of Pennsylvania bio"

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Composición nutricional: Proteína

Composición nutricional: Proteína | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Xiaoming et al. (2010) evaluaron  el contenido proteico de 100 especies de insectos, la siguiente tabla muestra como el contenido proteico se encuentra en un rango que varía entre un 13 y un 77% de proteína en materia seca y de cómo existen grandes variaciones entre, y en las distintas especies de insectos. Contenido en…
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Raise Edible Insects at Home With the Livin Farms Desktop Hive

Raise Edible Insects at Home With the Livin Farms Desktop Hive | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
We talk to company co-founder Katharina Unger about eating bugs for better personal and environmental health.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"When someone receives a Hive starter kit, it comes with what Livin Farms calls “micro livestock”—in this case, mealworms, which have a neutral taste but are high in protein, like other meats. These mealworms are placed in the “pupation compartment” in the Hive’s top drawer, where they are fed vegetable scraps from an individual’s kitchen along with some oats. A button triggers a controlled microclimate, ensuring that the mealworms are given enough fresh air and the right temperature to grow, then activates the harvest."

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INSETTI COMMESTIBILI – l’esperto risponde – EDIBLEINSECTS

INSETTI COMMESTIBILI – l’esperto risponde – EDIBLEINSECTS | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
nauguriamo questa rubrica con un’intervista ad Andrea Mascaretti, Presidente del Salone Internazionale della Ricerca e Sicurezza  Alimentare e promotore del progetto italiano “Edible Insects” che ha realizzato la mostra sui prodotti alimentari a base di insetti commestibili nel FFD (Future Food District Expo 2015) e ha organizzato la prima, e fin’ora unica, degustazione d’insetti commestibili autorizzata in Italia (in Expo 2015).
Ana C. Day's insight:

"La ringrazio Presidente Mascaretti, e la saluto con un’ultima domanda: in futuro, sarà possibile considerare anche in Italia gli insetti come alimento e acquistarli nei supermercati?

E’ solo questione di tempo. L’EFSA, l’Agenzia europea per la sicurezza alimentare che ha sede a Parma, ha già pubblicato, sotto forma di profilo di rischio, un proprio parere sugli insetti commestibili. Il Parlamento europeo sta approvando un nuovo regolamento per il “novel food”. Insomma, la macchina europea si è messa inesorabilmente in moto e presto avremo delle regole che ci consentiranno l’utilizzo di insetti come alimento in Italia, così come nel resto d’Europa."

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Insectos consumidos actualmente: Los Saltamontes

Insectos consumidos actualmente: Los Saltamontes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Los saltamontes comestibles (Ruspolia differens), también conocidos comúnmente como Homorocoryphus nitidulus vicinus, son unos saltamontes de cuernos largos de la familia Tettigoniidae. Es un alimento común en muchas partes del África oriental y meridional. En la región del Lago Victoria, al este de África, donde los saltamontes se conocen como nsenene, juegan un papel muy…
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Wakayama NPO chief using locusts for the perfect seasoning | The Japan Times

Wakayama NPO chief using locusts for the perfect seasoning | The Japan Times | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
KINOKAWA, WAKAYAMA PREF. – In an effort to revitalize rural areas, nonprofit organization leader Hiroto Tanaka has developed a soy sauce-like seasoning using traditional fermentation technologies in western Japan.

However, what makes his product unconventional is its basic ingredient — Japanese inago (locusts).

The salty sauce “harmonizes well with bonito and mushroom stock,” Tanaka says, adding that the product is suitable for traditional washoku (Japanese cuisine) dishes.
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This food entrepreneur will convince you to eat insects

This food entrepreneur will convince you to eat insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
At Esca Bona, Aspire Foods' founder explains how to help consumers overcome the psychological barriers that prevent them from eating sustainable insect protein.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Austin-based Mohammed Ashour is on a mission to help consumers get over the “ick” factor of eating insects, and to embrace bugs as a sustainable source of protein. How? By founding Aspire Foods, an ingredient supply company that mills insects into fine powders that are easily incorporated into bars, snacks and more.

At Esca Bona, Ashour explained why bugs should be a big part of the good-food future, and why this emerging food trend really has legs."

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S. Korea's insect industry grows sharply over 4 years

S. Korea's insect industry grows sharply over 4 years | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
SEOUL, Feb. 5 (Yonhap) -- The South Korean market for insects has grown drastically over the past four years, indicating it could emerge as a promising future industry, a state think tank said Friday.

In a report, the Korea Rural Economic Institute (KREI) estimated the size of the market at 313.9 billion won (US$268 million) last year, up 90 percent from 168 billion won in 2011.

Last year insects were most used at local governments' events, valued at 181.6 billion won. Events using insects included a butterfly festival in Hampyong, South Jeolla Province; a firefly festival in Muju, North Jeolla Province; and an insect bioexpo in Yecheon, North Gyeongsang Province.

The market for pet insects like rhinoceros beetles and stag beetles was estimated at between 37.2 billion won and 49.6 billion won, respectively, while that for pollen-carrying insects was 43.2 billion won.

Trading of edible insects and insects for animal feed was valued at 6 billion won each. About 5 billion won worth of insects were sold to be used as natural enemies against harmful insects, while 4.9 billion won worth of insects were sold for studying purposes and 2 to 3 billion won worth of bugs were traded to be used as medicine.
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Innovative formulation -Science meets nature !

Innovative formulation -Science meets nature ! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Science meets nature

Our innovative formulation draws its inspiration from 20 years of research and food product development. Detailed biochemistry and exhaustive food science trials have done the hard work of nutritional science for you.

Respect your body. Try Smash Nutrition high protein recovery powder and start smashing your goals today.

Our formulation contains natural sources of
proteases (which help digest proteins) from fruit, and all the essential amino acids. Get to grips with our myriad of wonder ingredients below.
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Cambridge Entrepreneurs Ep1 - Entomos | Cambridge TV

Cambridge Entrepreneurs Ep1 - Entomos | Cambridge TV | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Luther Phillips from the Judge Business School meets innovative Cambridge start-ups to hear their pitch and test their ideas. Got something to say about this show? Have your say below in the comments, or head over to our Forums. Tweet Share 0 Reddit +1 Pinterest LinkedIn 0 Watch Now
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Aflatoxin Contamination Detected in Nutrient and Anti-Oxidant Rich Edible Stink Bug Stored in Recycled Grain Containers

Aflatoxin Contamination Detected in Nutrient and Anti-Oxidant Rich Edible Stink Bug Stored in Recycled Grain Containers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Recently, there has been multi-agency promotion of entomophagy as an environmentally-friendly source of food for the ever increasing human population especially in the developing countries. However, food quality and safety concerns must first be addressed in this context. We addressed these concerns in the present study using the edible stink bug Encosternum delegorguei , which is widely consumed in southern Africa. We analysed for mycotoxins, and health beneficials including antioxidants, amino acids and essential fatty acids using liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-Qtof-MS) and coupled gas chromatography (GC)-MS. We also performed proximate analysis to determine nutritional components. We identified the human carcinogen mycotoxin (aflatoxin B 1 ) at low levels in edible stink bugs that were stored in traditonally woven wooden dung smeared baskets and gunny bags previously used to store cereals. However, it was absent in insects stored in clean zip lock bags. On the other hand, we identified 10 fatty acids, of which 7 are considered essential fatty acids for human nutrition and health; 4 flavonoids and 12 amino acids of which two are considered the most limiting amino acids in cereal based diets. The edible stink bug also contained high crude protein and fats but was a poor source of minerals, except for phosphorus which was found in relatively high levels. Our results show that the edible stink bug is a nutrient- and antioxidant-rich source of food and health benefits for human consumption. As such, use of better handling and storage methods can help eliminate contamination of the edible stink bug with the carcinogen aflatoxin and ensure its safety as human food.
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Food Security: Insects for Dinner? - The Naked Scientists

Food Security: Insects for Dinner? - The Naked Scientists | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
By 2050 the global population is set to rise to more than 10 billion people. But right now, 1 in 10 people are suffering from chronic hunger. So how do we reconcile a rising population with an already hungry world? Plus in the news, why scientists are one step closer to understanding autism, and we take a moment to say goodbye to the Philae Lander...
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La fattoria da cucina per allevare insetti commestibili in casa - Wired

La fattoria da cucina per allevare insetti commestibili in casa - Wired | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Sulla piattaforma di crowdfunding Kickstarter è possibile finanziare il progetto che permette un allevamento domestico di insetti
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Entrepreneur Spotlight: Pat Crowley of Chapul

Entrepreneur Spotlight: Pat Crowley of Chapul | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
More and more of us are asking the question, “how can I get more protein in my diet?” Well, Pat Crowley, founder of Chapul, has the answer. Over the past few years, his company has worked to create a grassroots movement to introduce insects into the food chain, something that has been done outside the…
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Insects as Sustainable Food Ingredients: Production, Processing and Food Applications

Insects as Sustainable Food Ingredients: Production, Processing and Food Applications | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Aaron T. Dossey Juan A. Morales-Ramos M. Guadalupe Rojas November 1, 2016
Academic Press
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Bugs. It's what's for dinner

Bugs. It's what's for dinner | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Piper Patten, 6, isn't quite sure she likes the taste of the chocolate-covered crickets she just popped into her mouth.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The gains are tremendous. According to bugsfordinner.com, "crickets have as much protein as beef, as little fat as salmon and use less than 1 percent of the water needed to produce meat. In fact, edible insects can provide protein with all of the amino acids humans need, they have more calcium than milk, more iron than spinach and are packed with omega 3s and B12. They are also a prebiotic. In fact, everything about them looks great on paper."

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What can trump disgust? Cash? Or the fear of missing out?

What can trump disgust? Cash? Or the fear of missing out? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In most western countries, eating insects still provokes disgust and horror. As the interest in entomophagy grows, a lot of stakeholders will be looking for that magic persuasive factor. What does it take to get people to eat an insect?
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Perhaps then it’s unrealistic to single out one factor in isolation, but it’s definitely worth bearing in mind just how strong our powers of persuasion are. If disgust towards insects is a learned reaction, could it be a question of ‘mind over matter’ to shift that disgust into curiosity and perhaps even enthusiasm?

What could persuade you to take the plunge?"

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Korea's insect industry grows sharply over 4 years

Korea's insect industry grows sharply over 4 years | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
(Yonhap)The South Korean market for insects has grown drastically over the past four years, indicating it could emerge as a promising future industry, a state think tank said Friday.In a report, the Korea Rural Economic Institute estimated the size of the market at 313.9 billion won ($268 million) last year, up 90 percent from 168 billion won in 2011.Last year insects were most used at local governments' events, valu...
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Meet Max Ries, Who Brought Edible Insects to 1940s Chicago | Jewniverse

Meet Max Ries, Who Brought Edible Insects to 1940s Chicago | Jewniverse | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
There’s been a surge of interest in entomophagy, the human consumption of insects. Eighty percent of the world’s population already does it. Even in Israel, a recent locust swarm got foodies salivating, even though it’s unclear whether–or more precisely, which–locusts are kosher.

Americans have been eating insects for decades, and one of its chief proponents was a German-Jewish textile manufacturer. Max Ries set up a cheese import business out of the back of his station wagon in Chicago in the early 1940s. Ries indulged the American fascination with exotic foods by selling tinned tiger and elephant meat obtained from zoos, as well as kangaroo and reindeer steaks. Ries had a flair for the theatrical; he “was slim and dashing; he wore handmade suits and twirled his cigars.”
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Ghana: Palm tree Weevil larvae to address low Blood-Iron Levels

Ghana: Palm tree Weevil larvae to address low Blood-Iron Levels | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Aspire Food Group operates Ghana’s first commercial insect farm. It wants to bring insects from the culinary margins to the mainstream to address food shortages, as well as to boost people’s iron i…

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To Eat Or Not To Eat Insects…

To Eat Or Not To Eat Insects… | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Entomophagy, the act of humans consuming insects. Although the norm for many cultures (around 80% of the world's population) across South America, Asia and Africa, most Brits' exposure and knowledge of eating creepy crawlies starts and finishes with having watched celebs eat them as a challenge on I'm a Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here. And for them, the idea of it isn't an appealing one.

However, with the detrimental environmental effects (air and water pollution, deforestation and overfishing) of farming such vast quantities of livestock 'needed' to fulfil the growing demands for meat and fish, then eating insects might be the answer. It is a cost-effective and eco-friendly process and they're packed with protein, minerals, vitamins, fibre and healthy fats.
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