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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Current State of Legislation For Insects As Food - 4ento

Current State of Legislation For Insects As Food - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Is selling Insects as Food legal? Find out what the current state of legislation is for edible insects and what the future holds for this rising trend.
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The psychology of eating insects: A cross-cultural comparison between Germany and China

The psychology of eating insects: A cross-cultural comparison between Germany and China | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The Chinese have more favourable attitudes toward insects as food.

The Chinese reported a higher willingness to eat insects compared to the Germans.

The Germans were more willing to eat processed compared to unprocessed insects.

The impact of food neophobia on the willingness to eat insects was equally high in both countries.

Ana C. Day's insight:
Abstract

Based on their high nutritional value and low production costs, insects are an excellent and sustainable source of animal protein. In contrast to countries such as China, in western societies, the consumption of insects is not rooted in traditional diet. Data for the present study was collected from adults in Germany (n=502) and China (n=443). A cross-cultural comparison was conducted based on consumers’ willingness to eat different insect-based, processed (e.g., cookies based on cricket flour) and unprocessed (e.g., crickets) food. The influence of food neophobia on consumers’ willingness to eat insects was examined. The Chinese rated all insect-based food more favourably with regard to taste, nutritional value, familiarity and social acceptance compared with the Germans. Also, they indicated greater willingness to eat the tested food products, and no differences were observed between their ratings of processed and unprocessed food. The Germans reported higher willingness to eat the processed insect-based foods compared to the unprocessed foods. Further results revealed that low scores for food neophobia, positive taste expectations, high scores for social acceptance and experiences with eating insects in the past were significant predictors of consumers’ willingness to eat insects in both countries. Consequently, the introduction of insects as a food source in Western societies seems more likely to succeed if insects are incorporated into familiar food items, which will reduce neophobic reactions and negative attitudes towards insect-based foods.

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A newcomer's guide to edible bugs

A newcomer's guide to edible bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
They're packed with protein and can taste pretty delicious. Here are some bugs worth biting.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Many different species of insects are eaten around the world, but in Western countries, we’re still generally grossed out at the thought. A report released by the United Nations in 2013 encouraged people to eat more insects. That’s because insects are rich in protein, and farming of insects has a much lower environmental footprint than cattle, for instance. So what’s best to try if you’re an insect-eating newbie? We’re to help you figure out which insects can be quite delicious, and which you can leave for the birds (literally)."

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Equity Financing for Food Startups

Equity Financing for Food Startups | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Who is funding food businesses? These guys. Check out this list of equity financing for food startups and growth companies.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"As someone who loves food, wants to change the world, and believes that start-ups and early stage financiers can help drive much-needed change in our food industry, I keep tabs on investors working in the food and agriculture spaces.  Here’s a quick list of groups working in the industry — and for startups, potential sources of equity financing."

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Edible Insects Are the New Trend In Food

Edible Insects Are the New Trend In Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In an unusual turn of culinary events, one of the major trends shaping the food industry today is edible insects. Crickets, grasshoppers, ants, even earthworms, are being dry roasted, fried, sautée...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"What do insects offer in terms of food value? They are high in protein, vitamins and minerals, low in fat and cheap to produce. They may be the answer to improving the world’s nutrition, particularly when it comes to protein and iron deficiencies. In fact, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, at least 2 billion people worldwide are already regularly eating insects as a part of their daily diet."

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The Shopping List - Crickers Crackers !

The Shopping List - Crickers Crackers ! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Crickers Crackers

Eating insects may seem to be the latest fad for armchair Andrew Zimmerns, but the makers of Crickers are no novelty act. The website's handy infographics point to all the very good reasons (both health and environmental) we should all add the word exoskeleton to our foodie vocabulary, but you won't need any other reason than the taste. And for the squeamish, rest assured that the crickets are ground into the flour. There are no antennae to contend with (we're sorry to disappoint your 4-year-old). There's limited distribution for now, but the founders are hoping their Kickstarter (ending May 2) will change that. www.crickerscrackers.com.
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8 creepy mystery ingredients in fast food

8 creepy mystery ingredients in fast food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
7. Beetle juices (carminic acid, confectioner's glaze)
Food dyes approved by the FDA include colors synthesized from petroleum derivatives and coal tar, but with all of the negative attention paid to artificial food color, natural dyes are on the rise. Yet some food dyes based on natural ingredients come from things that you may not care to ingest. Meet carminic acid, a commonly used red food coloring that comes from the dried, crushed bodies of female scale insects called cochineal. Variously known as Cochineal, Cochineal Extract, Carmine, Crimson Lake, Natural Red 4, C.I. 75470, E120 — it is used in a wide variety of products ranging from some meat, sausages, processed poultry products, marinades, bakery products, toppings, cookies, desserts, icings, pie fillings, jams, preserves, gelatins, juices, drinks, dairy products, sauces and dessert products.
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Fort Collins hosts first bug-eating class

Fort Collins hosts first bug-eating class | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Roasted cricket fondue and sautéed mealworms were on the menu Wednesday night at a bug-eating event hosted by the Growing Project, a local non-profit organization.


The sold-out class had 20 attendees, ranging in age from a few months old to 70 years, many looking to learn, cook and taste.

Rachel Sitz, co-producer of the bug-eating course and a graduate student in entomology at Colorado State University, said she was excited to teach the class.
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Controversial new research regarding cricket farming? Not really. . .

Controversial new research regarding cricket farming? Not really. . . | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Here at Chapul world headquarters, we’re always on the lookout for innovators and insights to fuel the protein revolution. Two weeks ago, two University of California researchers – Mark Lundy and Michael Parrella – published a study of cricket “ranching” techniques which falls squarely into this category.

Ana C. Day's insight:

Enjoy the read: 

"First, a bit of context. Livestock production boils down to a few key efficiency metrics, particularly the “feed conversion ratio (FCR)” and “protein conversion efficiency (PCE).” These numbers describe inputs and outputs – FCR contrasts the quantity of feed required to produce a kilogram of edible animal, and PCE compares the protein produced (as meat) to the protein consumed (in the feed). As one example, Tyson Foods, an 80 year old behemoth which slaughters roughly six million chickens per dayestimates that it takes a bit more than 200 pounds of corn (aka 3.7 bushels) to produce 100 pounds of boneless, skinless chicken meat. That’s feed conversion. Agribusiness companies focus on these ratios because feed often absorbs 50-80% of the total cost of meat production; meat producers care a…"

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Test : "Le criquet à la Grecque" de Jimini's

Test : "Le criquet à la Grecque" de Jimini's | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bonjour à tous! Aujourd'hui c'est la seconde dégustation de produits de la gamme "Jimini's - les insectes comestibles" . Nous quittons le Mexique, mais on reste sous le soleil avec "Le Criquet à la...
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Charleston women leap into cricket flour business

Charleston women leap into cricket flour business | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Even with an increasing number of commercial kitchens available for Lowcountry food entrepreneurs to rent, finding the right facility can be a challenge, especially when you’re proposing to haul a bunch of bugs into the Department of Health-ap
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Regulating edible insects: the challenge of addressing food security, nature conservation, and the erosion of traditional food culture

Regulating edible insects: the challenge of addressing food security, nature conservation, and the erosion of traditional food culture | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it


"Abstract

Entomophagy is a common practice in many regions of the world but there are few examples of national regulations that govern insects for human consumption.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Where entomophagy is not common, the current regulatory discourse focuses primarily on food safety and consumer protection. In countries where insects contribute to local diets, nature conservation is often an issue of high importance. This paper investigates the variation in the ways in which entomophagy and its related activities are currently regulated in Thailand, Switzerland, Kenya and Canada. Authoritative bodies who are responsible and the roles they play are discussed. Insects have only recently entered into the sustainable food dialogue, but have not yet been incorporated into policy documents and have been largely omitted from regulatory frameworks. Moreover, even in nations where there is a tradition of consuming a variety of insect species, they do not appear explicitly in dietary guidelines. Although food safety is a major concern, it can undermine the importance of nature conservation, traditional food culture, food security, and potential economic development. Thus, entomophagy should be viewed holistically and development of future legislation must take into consideration its multi-dimensional nature."

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Is it legal to farm insects (for human consumption) in the UK? - The Bug Shack

Is it legal to farm insects (for human consumption) in the UK? - The Bug Shack | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I was uncertain for a long time about whether or not it was legal to farm insects for human consumption in the UK. It’s hard to find a yes/no answer to that, so I thought I’d find out for myself. Here’s the short version:

Is it legal to sell insects in the UK for human consumption? Yes, certain species.
Is it legal to farm insects in the UK for human consumption? Yes, for now.
Is it legal to farm insects for animal feed in the UK? No, not for land animals; it is allowed for fish.
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California’s first edible cricket farm to open in the San Fernando Valley

California’s first edible cricket farm to open in the San Fernando Valley | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
One day soon, the sound of a cricket’s chirp could make your mouth water.

That’s what entrepreneur Elliot Mermel is hoping will happen. The 25-year-old is jumping into the emerging edible insect industry by opening what he calls California’s first urban cricket farm for human consumption in Van Nuys.

“I asked the question everybody else asks at first,” Mermel said Friday. “Who the hell is going to eat a cricket?”
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OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS FOR INCLUSION OF INSECTS in the FOOD CHAIN

OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS FOR INCLUSION OF INSECTS in the FOOD CHAIN | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Publication » OPPORTUNITIES AND CONSTRAINTS FOR INCLUSION OF INSECTS in the FOOD CHAIN.
Ana C. Day's insight:

overview

  1. Context and Drivers in our Food and Feed supply:

    The (animal!) Protein crunch

  2. Why Insects ?

    Most suitable alternative, globally

  3. FAO’s role ?

    Awareness and info sharing

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The Science of the Yuk and the Yum of Things

The Science of the Yuk and the Yum of Things | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
But while some food products may no longer be available, others will develop. Insect-based foods that might have once caused the yuck face were deemed “rather tasty” at a symposium in Copenhagen in 2011, and McQuaid concludes that “Bug cuisine is a promising frontier.”

For those that don’t find bug cuisine appetizing, let’s end with a happier thought. According to McQuaid, the human brain is programmed to always allow people to have room for dessert.
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Kofi Annan: ‘We must challenge climate-change sceptics who deny the facts’

Kofi Annan: ‘We must challenge climate-change sceptics who deny the facts’ | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Should we be encouraged to reduce their meat consumption?

The global livestock industry is indeed a major threat to the climate as it represents 14.5% of all human-caused greenhouse gas emissions according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. A growing population and a rapidly growing middle class are increasing pressure on the traditional protein sources, beef and poultry meat, making it more difficult to meet demand. We cannot continue the way we are producing and consuming meat. Obviously, this should not go as far as governments telling people what to eat. However, keeping meat consumption to levels recommended by health authorities would lower emissions and reduce heart disease, cancer, and other diseases. And of course there are alternative sources of protein. For example, raising insects as an animal protein source. Insects have a very good conversion rate from feed to meat.They make up part of the diet of two billion people and are commonly eaten in many parts of the world. Eating insects is good for the environment and balanced diets.

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Good News: Cricket Protein Bars Are Almost Here | WIRED

Good News: Cricket Protein Bars Are Almost Here | WIRED | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Forget Kind Bars. An Icelandic company wants to make your next energy bar out of insects.
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Interview with Greg Sewitz, Co-CEO of Exo

Interview with Greg Sewitz, Co-CEO of Exo | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Food taster; time not-waster: Entrepreneur, Yale, Public Health, Food Policy, Entomophagy, Travel, Running, Poker, Puns. COO  @ Spylight  |  @ IHYale
Ana C. Day's insight:

by Aly … "I love protein bars. Long before I ever started eating insects, I was an avid consumer of any rectangular-shaped portable bar of energy. Then I discovered that most of these bars were full of sugar and not actually as good for me as my track coach said they were. This is aside from the point, but simply meant to illustrate my excitement when I learned I would be speaking with Greg Sewitz, the co-CEO of Exo. 

Exo produces delicious, nutritious, and sustainable protein bars (without a ton of sugar!) with crickets as the main ingredient! I spoke with Greg to learn about how he got his start creating cricket protein bars, and to discover how he sees public adoption of his product progressing. "

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Edible insects—a novel source of essential nutrients for human diet: Learning from traditional knowledge

Edible insects—a novel source of essential nutrients for human diet: Learning from traditional knowledge | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Implications
  • The consumption of insects is known as entomophagy, and it is practiced by indigenous communities from different regions of the world.

  • ·The key nutritional values of edible insect include: high protein content and quality superior to many protein sources; highly unsaturated fats, particularly linoleic and linolenic acids, which are essential fatty acids; vitamins and minerals, particularly the B group of vitamins and essential trace elements, such as iron, zinc, and copper. Besides, they are rich in dietary fiber in the form of chitin, which presents a host of other health and nutrition benefits.

  • ·The large-scale production and use of edible insects can help to improve the environment, health, and livelihood of those consuming them. In developing countries, where undernourishment is at a critical level, harnessing and adopting edible insects in the household food supply system can radically improve nutrition and food security.

  • ·The mass rearing and production of the edible insects need to be managed efficiently in order ensure the insects and other resources are conserved.

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Eating Bugs with Anna Faris, Tituss Burgess & Chef David George Gordon - YouTube

Chef David George Gordon, who prepares gourmet dishes with bugs as protein, has James, Anna and Tituss try ants, cockroaches and a deep fried tarantula. Subs...
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Breaking the Bug Taboo | Edible Bug Farm

Breaking the Bug Taboo | Edible Bug Farm | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Only time will tell how and when edible insects will follow sushi and lobster, making their way on to our plates and breaking the bug taboo in the UK.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Matt: "In the UK, our entomophagy industry is a little behind that of our Dutch and American counterparts, but it IS growing and big things are on the horizon for our stakeholders. Media coverage of the global edible insect hype is polarising public opinion, strengthening the sceptics’ aversion to insects, but bolstering the more adventurous eaters’ taste for bugs. More importantly, however, those of us that lie somewhere in that middle ground are the ones that will be targeted with exciting new ways of presenting insect-based foods."

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Welcome @bugfoundation !!

Welcome @bugfoundation !! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Click here to edit the content

WE ARE THE FIRST GERMAN COMPANY INTRODUCING AN INSECT BASED HAMBURGER.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Where can I get the BUX BURGER?

We are a young startup, so give us a little time. At the moment we are running up and down the streets talking to producers, investors, distributers and so on. It is actually going very well and we will most likely be able to enter the Dutch and Belgian market by the end of the year."

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Seriez-vous prêts à manger des insectes?

Seriez-vous prêts à manger des insectes? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

115.000 allergiques aux crustacés ou mollusques en France

L'allergie aux crustacés ou mollusques touche en France environ 115.000 individus et "environ 100.000 personnes" pourraient "potentiellement" présenter une réaction allergique après l'ingestion d'insectes. D'autres dangers peuvent guetter les consommateurs d'insectes. Ces derniers peuvent en effet être contaminés par des parasites, des bactéries ou des champignons, observe l'Anses. Aussi "l'élevage, la préparation et la commercialisation d'insectes pour l'alimentation devraient être entourés de précautions spécifiques", estime l'Agence. L'Union européenne devrait établir une liste des insectes pouvant être consommés et une liste négative d'espèces présentant des dangers et doivent être interdites à la consommation, juge l'Anses.

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Need protein? Try a cricket

Need protein? Try a cricket | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
If you’re wanting to add some extra crunch and protein to your next meal, bugs are the way to go.
Although not a new phenomenon, insect consumption has become more popular due to an increased demand for new animal proteins and is a field being seriously pursued by biotech entrepreneurs.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"If eating an insect raw doesn’t sound appealing to you, never fear. There are recipes for bug brownies, cookies, pancakes, protein bars and a variety of other dishes depending on how you want your protein served."

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