Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Cicadas set to descend on East Coast can be tasty dishes when well-prepared

Cicadas set to descend on East Coast can be tasty dishes when well-prepared | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The stick-legged, buzzing and bug-eyed insects are coming — but you can do your part to exterminate cicadas: eat ‘em!
Billions of Brood II cicadas are set to hatch this spring, bringing a once every 17 years plague to most of the East Coast.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Shrimp and lobster eat garbage and they are the insects of the ocean,’ says cicada cook Jenna Jadin. ‘If we eat those without much afterthought, why not eat insects?’

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/cicada-cooking-pizza-tacos-jello-article-1.1314334#ixzz2QWuvOuHy";

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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction

#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What happens when you eat bugs for 30 days? We believe it will help fuel a movement to end global malnutrition. Little Herds is proud to partner with Seeds Of Action for the #BugsEndHunger campaign. On May 1st, Seeds Of Action co-founder Jeremy Connor will begin his 30 day diet of eating bugs and plant based foods that can be found, or brought in through food aid programs, in areas where the 1 billion chronically hungry are struggling to live. This campaign will bring awareness to edible insects as a sustainable solution to food insecurity and produce a freely distributed, visually based, Farming Insects Guide (FIG) to empower communities across the planet to begin farming insects for food and economic security.
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Get ready, smart food is coming

Get ready, smart food is coming | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FOOD technology ranging from edible packaging to algae-based proteins will find a broader market and keep jobs in Australia, with the help of a new CSIRO food and agribusiness, Roadmap.

The report reveals global opportunities for businesses behind innovations such as starch-based packaging, allergenic-free nuts and tolerable varieties of lactose and gluten, as well as the growing edible-insect market, and guide them to ways to “capture value and keep jobs in Australia”.

Its release on Monday, during the Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology convention in Sydney, highlighted the importance of innovation for economic growth.

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Sirius VC hops on grasshopper food trend

Sirius VC hops on grasshopper food trend | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Fancy snacking on some grasshoppers - a high-protein taste sensation some say is a bit like ikan bilis?

It may not be everyone's superfood of choice yet but home-grown entrepreneurial finance firm Sirius Venture Capital is hopping on this emerging food trend.

Together with Dutch-based SLJ Investment Partners, it has led a US$600,000 (S$821,000) seed funding round in Hargol FoodTech, an Israeli start-up that has developed new methods to sustainably farm grasshoppers for protein.
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Evaluation of hazardous chemicals in edible insects and insect-based food intended for human consumption. - Semantic Scholar

Evaluation of hazardous chemicals in edible insects and insect-based food intended for human consumption. - Semantic Scholar | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract

Due to the rapid increase in world population, the waste of food and resources, and non-sustainable food production practices, the use of alternative food sources is currently strongly promoted. In this perspective, insects may represent a valuable alternative to main animal food sources due to their nutritional value and sustainable production. However, edible insects may be perceived as an unappealing food source and are indeed rarely consumed in developed countries. The food safety of edible insects can thus contribute to the process of acceptance of insects as an alternative food source, changing the perception of developed countries regarding entomophagy. In the present study, the levels of organic contaminants (i.e. flame retardants, PCBs, DDT, dioxin compounds, pesticides) and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sn, Zn) were investigated in composite samples of several species of edible insects (greater wax moth, migratory locust, mealworm beetle, buffalo worm) and four insect-based food items currently commercialized in Belgium. The organic chemical mass fractions were relatively low (PCBs: 27-2065 pg/g ww; OCPs: 46-368 pg/g ww; BFRs: up to 36 pg/g ww; PFRs 783-23800 pg/g ww; dioxin compounds: up to 0.25 pg WHO-TEQ/g ww) and were generally lower than those measured in common animal products. The untargeted screening analysis revealed the presence of vinyltoluene, tributylphosphate (present in 75% of the samples), and pirimiphos-methyl (identified in 50% of the samples). The levels of Cu and Zn in insects were similar to those measured in meat and fish in other studies, whereas As, Co, Cr, Pb, Sn levels were relatively low in all samples (<0.03 mg/kg ww). Our results support the possibility to consume these insect species with no additional hazards in comparison to the more commonly consumed animal products.
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Easy Guide to Raising Mealworms Farm in 4 Steps for Beginners

Easy Guide to Raising Mealworms Farm in 4 Steps for Beginners | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Raising mealworms is something you need to consider seriously. They make tasty treats for any kind of feathered fowl that you may be raising on your homestead.

Most people raise mealworms for their chickens. I raise ducks and guinea fowl along with chickens, and they all love them.

It takes a small effort but could potentially save you a lot of money.

So if you are interested in learning how to raise more of your poultry’s food (even if you don’t have a lot of space), this could be the post you’ve been waiting on.
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Bug juice booze: How this product design duo is making their name in the alcohol game

Bug juice booze: How this product design duo is making their name in the alcohol game | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bug juice is a real thing.

Skeptical? So was I when I first tried Critter Bitters, the aromatic bitters made from crickets. I couldn’t get the idea of dirt, grass, and creepy crawlies out of my mind as I prepared to take my first sip. Of course I was just being ridiculous—the bitters do not resemble bugs in the slightest. The nutty, earthy taste is more akin to toasted walnuts or woodsmoke than anything that chirps.

That’s the point.

Critter Bitters aims to help people “get over the ‘ick’ factor associated with entomophagy, or eating insects,” according to co-founders Julia Plevin and Lucy Knops. The creative duo met while earning their MFAs in Product Design at The School of Visual Arts, and have since made a name for themselves in two tricky-to-navigate fields. Not only did they concoct a successful bug-based product, but they also carved a niche for themselves in the artisanal alcohol industry, an arena which remains largely male-dominated.
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Reading it right on novel foods

Reading it right on novel foods | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
On 1 January 2018, Regulation (EC) No. 258/97 on novel foods and novel food ingredients will cease to apply, and Regulation (EU) No. 2015/2283 on novel foods will take its place. Although the incoming Regulation 2015/2283 has the same ‘cut off’ date of 15 May 1997 for defining a novel food, it brings in some changes to the authorisation process and classification categories of novel foods.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Expert speakers will meet on 27 September 2017 in London to discuss the implications of these changes such as the points expected to be of priority in future reviews of novel foods and the potential effects of Regulation 2015/2283 on certain food categories already present on the market, with the status of insects and insect-derived products discussed as an example.

Francesca Lotta, Associate, Bird & Bird, will deliver a stimulating presentation entitled ‘Authorising edible insects under the new novel food regulation.’ Francesca advises companies from Food and Beverage on regulatory requirements for innovative products, such as novel foods, food supplements and nutraceuticals. She is also gaining a reputation as edible insects’ legislation expert, advising food and feed companies."

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Your Next Source of Protein Probably Had Wings—or Grew From a Petri Dish

Your Next Source of Protein Probably Had Wings—or Grew From a Petri Dish | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Think noshing on crickets is only for those of “Fear Factor” fame? Chances are, if you’re concerned with the health of both your own body and the planet, you may soon become more adventurous with your protein sources. As the global population continues to grow over the next several decades, the world is faced with the staggering challenge of producing enough food to feed the nine billion people who will inhabit the earth by 2050. Thankfully, the rapid evolution of technology is aiding research and production into alternative sources of protein.

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The Gateway Bug: a film about the future of food - InDaily

The Gateway Bug: a film about the future of food - InDaily | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FEATURES
A new documentary suggests that convincing people to eat insects is less of a challenge than the logistical problems surrounding their production, writes Susan Lawler.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"I’ve had the privilege of getting a sneak preview of a movie called The Gateway Bug, a documentary about feeding humanity in an uncertain age. It will be shown in Melbourne this weekend as part of the Melbourne Documentary Film Festival.

I wrote that eating insects is a good idea back in 2013, shortly after the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) released a report suggesting that using insects for food and feed would increase food security for our planet."

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To Save the Planet, Maybe It's Time to Start Eating More Insects?

To Save the Planet, Maybe It's Time to Start Eating More Insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
N LATE 2013, Arnold Van Huis, a professor of tropical entomology at Wageningen University in the Netherlands, conducted an experiment. He prepared two batches of meatballs: One was made entirely from beef, while the other was a 50-50 blend of beef and ground mealworms. Test subjects didn’t know which meatballs were which, and when asked which they favored, nine out of 10 chose the one mixed with mealworms.
Ana C. Day's insight:

“There’s no doubt that a wider adoption of entomophagy could help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture,” says Peter Alexander, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Edinburgh and a senior researcher at Scotland’s Rural College, who was the lead author of the study. “The benefits would arise if the consumption of insects displaces the consumption of conventional animal products.”

And there is a small but growing segment of adventurous diners who seem to agree. Globally, the consumption of edible insects generated more than $33 million in 2015 and is expected to reach $522 million by 2023. Of course, this is merely an appetizer portion when compared to the size of the global processed meat market, which racked up $714 billion in revenue in 2016 and is projected to exceed $1.5 trillion in the next five years."

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Bugging out: How we'll feed ourselves in 2167

Bugging out: How we'll feed ourselves in 2167 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
New food: Algae, fungus, insect protein

The carbon price and more expensive protein might hurt consumers’ bank accounts in the short term. In the longer term, however, these forces will create new market opportunities for low-energy food products. As a result, food scientists across Canada will explore low-energy protein supplies such as plants, fungi, algae and insects.

Although each of these sources of protein is relatively unknown to general consumers today, I expect an explosion of novel protein products to enter the market within a generation.

Initially, we will likely see plant-based proteins mixed with livestock proteins to reduce the overall carbon footprint of our diets. But as consumers become used to these new ingredients, they will became a regular part of the Canadian diet.

Edible insects, algae-based protein drinks and lab-grown “meat” will all become common. For example, “the Impossible Burger” that is made with no beef but tastes like a beef burger is making inroads into restaurants across North America.
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Will you be braving the unusual fare at Hawley Fayre this weekend?

Will you be braving the unusual fare at Hawley Fayre this weekend? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ever wondered what eating a giant locust tastes like? What about a Mexican-spiced meal worm, or a flying termite?

Head to Hawley Fayre on Saturday (July 8) and you can find out courtesy of a creepy crawly pop-up restaurant, dubbed The Pestaurant.

Rentokil, which has its head office on the Riverbank Meadows Business Park in Blackwater, will be bringing its wares to Hawley Green with a free mini-bug buffet.

Hardy visitors will be able to try exotic treats including buffalo worms, locusts, BBQ bamboo worms, flying termites and even ‘Frankenstein Fudge’ – if they dare.

Entomophagy (the official word for insect-eating) has been growing in popularity in the UK thanks to television shows like I’m a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here.
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Entomo Farms: 'We’re one of the most recognized [edible insect] brands across the world now'

Entomo Farms: 'We’re one of the most recognized [edible insect] brands across the world now' | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Canadian bug powder supplier Entomo Farms is still doing most of its business with snack food companies, but VP Darren Goldin – chatting with FoodNavigator-USA at the IFT show - envisions a future where frozen raw insects (as well as the roasted and milled variety) hit center stage.
To date said Goldin, most of the focus in North America has been on protein-rich powder (typically ground whole crickets) for use in nutrition bars and protein shakes. If bugs are going to truly become a viable alternative to meat as a protein source, however, they will need to find their way into a broader range of applications, he said.

"I’d like to see the raw product becoming available in a frozen format.

“The raw cricket has a very different taste and different functionality to a cricket that’s been roasted or roasted and ground into powder, the flavor profile is different and the way you can cook with it is different. Like any other meat I'd like to see this in the frozen food section like all of our proteins," said Goldin.

I see in the future you might have contract producers and centralized processing
Asked about the most efficient way to manufacture insect products at scale, Goldin said that at this stage of the industry’s evolution it made a lot of sense to be vertically integrated (Entomo Farms raises and processes its insects unlike some other players in the trade).

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New protein sources and food legislation: the case of edible insects and EU law

New protein sources and food legislation: the case of edible insects and EU law | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
Growing global food demand has generated a greater interest in the consumption of new and diversified protein sources. Novel foodstuffs represent a challenge for food law as they need proper safety assessments before obtaining market permission. The case of edible insects and European law is a good representation of this issue because a selection of food grade insect species may be available on the European market in the coming years. However, European legislation does not explicitly address edible insects. Consequently, this has left a grey area, allowing different interpretations of the legislation among Member States. The aim of this paper is to analyse the challenge of the safe management of edible insects in the context of the current legal framework. The current Novel Food legislation, as well as the forthcoming version of the legislation, will be analysed and discussed in relation to edible insects. Particular attention will be paid to the evolution of legislation and to the experiences of both EU and non-EU countries.
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Six-Time Award Winner Hargol FoodTech Completes Investment Round

Six-Time Award Winner Hargol FoodTech Completes Investment Round | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Hargol FoodTech took up the challenge of providing a protein alternative based on its proven technology and optimized methods to grow several species of grasshoppers quickly and under sanitary conditions. In field trials, the Company proved that the product has a 72% protein content level, contains all essential amino acids and a balanced ratio (1:1) of omega-3 and omega-6.

"Hargol FoodTech is the world's first commercial grasshopper farm. Our unique grasshopper protein, superior to any other protein source in nutritional content and efficiency, is attracting customers from all over the globe. The funds we raised will be used to expand our production capacity to meet the demand we have from the market," remarked Dror Tamir, CEO of Hargol FoodTech.

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TIME TO EMBRACE EATING INSECTS

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: SHAMI RADIA

Shami is Co-Founder of Eat Grub ltd (or Grub, for short). Before setting up Grub, Shami was Marketing Manager for the charity WaterAid. The idea of eating insects was introduced to Shami on a visit to Malawi with the charity, and he has not looked back since. His experience in marketing has given him a strong understanding of building relevant propositions and audience profiling as well as experience in developing, testing and taking new products to market.  His passion for marketing and sustainability made Grub the perfect venture. 
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Microbiological Load of Edible Insects Found in Belgium - Semantic Scholar

Microbiological Load of Edible Insects Found in Belgium - Semantic Scholar | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract

Edible insects are gaining more and more attention as a sustainable source of animal protein for food and feed in the future. In Belgium, some insect products can be found on the market, and consumers are sourcing fresh insects from fishing stores or towards traditional markets to find exotic insects that are illegal and not sanitarily controlled. From this perspective, this study aims to characterize the microbial load of edible insects found in Belgium (i.e., fresh mealworms and house crickets from European farms and smoked termites and caterpillars from a traditional Congolese market) and to evaluate the efficiency of different processing methods (blanching for all species and freeze-drying and sterilization for European species) in reducing microorganism counts. All untreated insect samples had a total aerobic count higher than the limit for fresh minced meat (6.7 log cfu/g). Nevertheless, a species-dependent blanching step has led to a reduction of the total aerobic count under this limit, except for one caterpillar species. Freeze-drying and sterilization treatments on European species were also effective in reducing the total aerobic count. Yeast and mold counts for untreated insects were above the Good Manufacturing Practice limits for raw meat, but all treatments attained a reduction of these microorganisms under this limit. These results confirmed that fresh insects, but also smoked insects from non-European trades, need a cooking step (at least composed of a first blanching step) before consumption. Therefore, blanching timing for each studied insect species is proposed and discussed.
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Eating Insects in Phuket - Phuket's Edible Bugs

Eating Insects in Phuket - Phuket's Edible Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eating insects in Thailand is one of the traditional challenges visitors face during a good night out, particularly in places like Bangkok’s Khao San Road and Phuket’s Bangla Road. However, edible bugs are also a popular choice for local Thais, being a light and surprisingly healthy snack. Once you get past the instinctive revulsion of putting creepy crawlies anywhere near your mouth, some are even quite moreish.

To help you on this unique culinary adventure, we’ve prepared the following list of the edible insects available in Phuket. You can find them at some of the night markets and a few established stalls around the island, but mostly from wandering vendors, especially near nightlife hotspots. We hope this information will give you some idea of what to expect when you take that first nervous nibble, as well as helping you pick the ones you’re more likely to successfully stomach!
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Reading it right on Novel Foods

The programme will look at the requirements of the incoming Regulation, the points expected to be of priority in future reviews of novel foods, and the potential effects of Regulation 2015/2283 on certain food categories already present on the market, with the status of insects and insect-derived products discussed as an example.

The possible implications of the UK’s exit from the EU on UK submissions that are already going through the novel foods process will be covered, as will the effect of this issue on future novel foods assessments by the UK.

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Edible insects can help solve hunger and improve nutrition in Sumatra: Study

Edible insects can help solve hunger and improve nutrition in Sumatra: Study | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects from Sumatra can provide a strategic solution for hunger problems and subsequent undernourishment due to their high essential fatty contents, researchers have concluded.
Academics say inhabitants of the Indonesian island are faced with insufficient food supplies, and that edible insects as a traditional and readily available food source could be part of the solution.

“Throughout Indonesia, 20 million people suffer from undernourishment, which is approximately 8% of the Indonesian population,” they wrote, adding that “one in every five children suffers from malnutrition and one in every three children suffers from stunting. However, edible insects bred in Sumatra for human consumption have never before been assessed with regard to their nutritional value.

Oleic acid

Their study analysed the crude protein, chitin, fat and selected fatty acid contents of giant mealworm larvae (Zophobas morio), larvae of the common mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) and nymphs of the field cricket (Gryllus assimilis).
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The insect Industry in ASEAN: Insights with AFFIA

The insect Industry in ASEAN: Insights with AFFIA
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Better munching with insects

Better munching with insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In the face of impending food scarcity, edible insects are a newfangled protein alternative. Modern food science and technology allows culinary creativity for bug-eating beyond what one can imagine. From the creepy crawly that may not seem appetising, today we have chocolate-coated crickets, scorpion vodka, crispy silkworms and cricket snacks in myriad flavours ranging from seaweed to barbecue to cheese.
These products are increasingly crawling up the shelves.
To create better understanding of eating insects for food security, the Asean Food and Feed Insects’ Association (AFFIA) recently hosted a public seminar entitled “Insect Industry in Asean: Insights With AFFIA” at Kasetsart University in Thailand. The event brought together representatives from various sectors who shed light on the prospect of insect-based food — a growing industry and a sustainable as well as nutritional diet.
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The Gateway Bug: a documentary about the future of food

The Gateway Bug:  a documentary about the future of food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I’ve had the privilege of getting a sneak preview of a movie called The Gateway Bug, which is a documentary about feeding humanity in an uncertain age. It will be shown in Melbourne next weekend as part of the Melbourne Documentary Film Festival.

I wrote that eating insects is a good idea back in 2013, shortly after the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) released a report suggesting that using insects for food and feed would increase food security for our planet.

Following the publication of that article, I was contacted by people who wanted to know how to start farming insects. They were looking for people to contact, for information on regulations. I was invariably unhelpful. I didn’t know the answers, and felt inadequate, but now I know that nobody knew the answers back then. We were at the very beginning of a journey.
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Edible Insect Ingredients: Sustainable Protein - Science & Food

Edible Insect Ingredients: Sustainable Protein - Science & Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Fig. 1 – Breakdown of the major macromolecules in a cricket. Photo Credit: Lee Cadesky (C-fu Foods) A classic bolognese sauce: tomato, ground beef….and insects? Brothers Lee and Eli Cadesky, the COO and CEO behind C-fu Foods and One Hop Kitchen, are revolutionizing what it means to be a Bolognese sauce with the invention of …
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Edible insects and Global food Production

Edible insects and Global food Production | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
This research was also focused to pick such products that most consumers like and react positively. The food samples they offered consumers contained a good spread of the insect products that could be found on Australia’s market, some of which could be better received than others.

Dr Crump, the leader of this project stated that this research will aid the development of an entire industry in the future.

In Australia, edible insect production industry is still emerging but far from full development. The most important for this industry is to make improvement of customer’s acceptance of edible insects, and realizing the potential as an alternative protein source, Dr Crump pointed out.

The project hopes to be able to find enough target consumers for edible insects and ways of encouraging consumers to accept insect food as an alternative source of proteins.

There is a huge potential for edible insect industry, and the main purpose of this research is to identify not only local and domestic markets, but also the entire world market through exporting.
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Want to cook crickets? New community ed class teaches bug eating

Once you get past the crunch, grasshoppers taste almost like chicken. 

That first bite is a leap of faith, but it can open a world of possibilities for sustainable eating and managing garden pests, said Sioux Falls resident Veronica Shukla.

Shukla, who also founded Project Food Forest, a nonprofit aimed at making Sioux Falls' landscape more edible, first came across entomophagy (bug eating) on her path to finding a sustainable way of life.

And this summer, she decided to take her bug-eating knowledge to the community. 

"You have to push past that gross factor ... and then once you do it, you realize, oh, it wasn't so bad," Shukla said.

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