Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Could Crickets Solve the World's Malnutrition Problem? | IdeaFeed | Big Think

Could Crickets Solve the World's Malnutrition Problem? | IdeaFeed | Big Think | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
To help feed the world's malnourished, a team of students at McGill University, Montreal, are putting forth a plan meant to facilitate the production of edible insects on an industrial scale.
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A team of students at McGill University, Montreal, are putting forth a plan meant to facilitate the production of edible insects on an industrial scale. "The idea is to distribute cricket-producing kits to the world's slums as a way of improving diets, and giving people more income. Families would eat what they needed, while selling the rest for processing into flour, and other products." Zev Thompson, one of the students, said: "We're proposing a factory to grind cricket-flour with corn, wheat or rice, whatever is local, and then creating very normal looking food that has an additional boost to it."

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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction

#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What happens when you eat bugs for 30 days? We believe it will help fuel a movement to end global malnutrition. Little Herds is proud to partner with Seeds Of Action for the #BugsEndHunger campaign. On May 1st, Seeds Of Action co-founder Jeremy Connor will begin his 30 day diet of eating bugs and plant based foods that can be found, or brought in through food aid programs, in areas where the 1 billion chronically hungry are struggling to live. This campaign will bring awareness to edible insects as a sustainable solution to food insecurity and produce a freely distributed, visually based, Farming Insects Guide (FIG) to empower communities across the planet to begin farming insects for food and economic security.
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The race to feed insects to livestock, pets and people

The race to feed insects to livestock, pets and people | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Not so long ago, insect farming occupied the land of the quirky and perhaps even the shady, given the $1-billion Ponzi scheme by China’s Yilishen Tianxi Group that bilked more than one million investors over an eight-year period until its collapse in 2007. The group promised farmers a 30-per-cent return on the ants they grew, supposedly to make a powdered ant cure-all.

Now, ventures in Canada, the United States, Europe, South Africa, China and Malaysia are vying to produce the large, sustained volume needed to generate real profits from selling insects as food for livestock, farmed fish and people.
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Edible insects and savoury ice cream to headline this year’s Edinburgh Food Festival - Scotsman Food and Drink

Edible insects and savoury ice cream to headline this year’s Edinburgh Food Festival - Scotsman Food and Drink | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects and lobster-flavoured ice cream will be among the more unusual delicacies at a five-day food festival kicking off in the Capital today.

Now in its third year, Assembly’s Edinburgh Food Festival will also feature goods by some of the country’s finest producers.

Returning to the city’s George Square Gardens following a hugely successful event last year in which 25,000 people attended, the foodie event will run until Sunday 30 July, and will kick off the Festival season which will take over the city this summer.

Organisers of the free food and drink event say they will welcome guests of all ages to the gardens, with stallholders offering everything from GROATS porridge, to Alanda’s Scottish lobster, and Crema Caravan’s Crème Brulee.

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Bugs, for people, are on the menu at Pittsburgh Zoo

Bugs, for people, are on the menu at Pittsburgh Zoo | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bugs give most people the creepy crawlies. The less we come across them, the better, right? 

Yet crickets, beetle larvae and other six-legged insects can be a low-impact, sustainable and nutritious protein alternative — if you can just get past the ick factor.

Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium and exterminator/pest control experts Ehrlich hope to make the case that insects are good eats at the zoo’s Summer Safari — Colors of the Jungle event on Friday.

The ticketed, after-hours party with live entertainment will allow guests to explore the zoo’s many animal exhibits and lush habitats sans children. And they’ll also get to check out the Jungle Odyssey, a new exhibit that plays host to some of the world’s most endangered species, including the largest rodent, the capybara. But the biggest thrills may be found in Ehrlich’s “Pestaurant,” where the brave-at-heart can sample a selection of gourmet edible insect eats.

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Polish scientists have been experimenting with ways to make insects appetizing

Polish scientists have been experimenting with ways to make insects appetizing | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Polish scientists have been mixing insects into cakes and sticking them in salad in an effort to make the idea of eating insects a little more appetizing.
Why? Well, if we don’t double food production in the next thirty years we’re not going to have enough to feed the world. Insects could be a cheap—and importantly, a really efficient—source of protein. Insects don’t produce as much methane as cows and they’re chock-full of protein. They’re also able to turn a lot of what we throw away into energy, so we’d be cutting down on global waste.
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Families catch, eat bugs at For-Mar Nature Preserve and Arboretum

Families catch, eat bugs at For-Mar Nature Preserve and Arboretum | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
BURTON, MI -- Bugs can be described as disgusting and gross.

But for several families at For-Mar Nature Preserve and Arboretum on Saturday, July 22, they were delicious.

"Ask a Scientist: Incredible Edible Bugs" took place Saturday afternoon at For-Mar, 2142 N. Genesee Road. The program provided the opportunity for people to try eating bugs of all kinds and learn about how to catch them.

It was a chance for them to taste what some other cultures in the world consider food.
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Insight into the proximate composition and microbial diversity of edible insects marketed in the European Union

Insight into the proximate composition and microbial diversity of edible insects marketed in the European Union | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
In recent years, the idea of exploiting edible insects for their industrial production has attracted the attention of media, research institutions and food industry operators, because of the numerous positive factors associated with this food source. Notwithstanding, insects are still underutilized in Western countries. Moreover, edible insects are carriers of natural microorganisms; hence, safety issues may arise from their industrial production. This study was aimed at providing insight into the proximate composition, with a focus in the fatty acid and amino acid composition, and microbial diversity of some processed edible insects marketed in the European Union. A high content of protein and fat was seen, with values ranging from 59.46 to 46.78 and 35.32 to 15.18%, respectively, with nutritionally valuable characteristics in both the lipid fractions and amino acid profiles.
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9 of the best breakfasts in Leeds

9 of the best breakfasts in Leeds | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

One talk even focuses on the unusual topic of eating insects.

“Pushing boundaries and challenging perceptions is something we revel in doing at Assembly, so this year we’ve got the taste phenomena of savoury ice-cream and edible insects to draw in the foodies, the bold, and the down right curious,” says Burgess.

The Crema Caravan team are excited to be part of an innovative festival putting the spotlight on Scottish produce.

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Get ready, smart food is coming

Get ready, smart food is coming | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FOOD technology ranging from edible packaging to algae-based proteins will find a broader market and keep jobs in Australia, with the help of a new CSIRO food and agribusiness, Roadmap.

The report reveals global opportunities for businesses behind innovations such as starch-based packaging, allergenic-free nuts and tolerable varieties of lactose and gluten, as well as the growing edible-insect market, and guide them to ways to “capture value and keep jobs in Australia”.

Its release on Monday, during the Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology convention in Sydney, highlighted the importance of innovation for economic growth.

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Sirius VC hops on grasshopper food trend

Sirius VC hops on grasshopper food trend | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Fancy snacking on some grasshoppers - a high-protein taste sensation some say is a bit like ikan bilis?

It may not be everyone's superfood of choice yet but home-grown entrepreneurial finance firm Sirius Venture Capital is hopping on this emerging food trend.

Together with Dutch-based SLJ Investment Partners, it has led a US$600,000 (S$821,000) seed funding round in Hargol FoodTech, an Israeli start-up that has developed new methods to sustainably farm grasshoppers for protein.
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Evaluation of hazardous chemicals in edible insects and insect-based food intended for human consumption. - Semantic Scholar

Evaluation of hazardous chemicals in edible insects and insect-based food intended for human consumption. - Semantic Scholar | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract

Due to the rapid increase in world population, the waste of food and resources, and non-sustainable food production practices, the use of alternative food sources is currently strongly promoted. In this perspective, insects may represent a valuable alternative to main animal food sources due to their nutritional value and sustainable production. However, edible insects may be perceived as an unappealing food source and are indeed rarely consumed in developed countries. The food safety of edible insects can thus contribute to the process of acceptance of insects as an alternative food source, changing the perception of developed countries regarding entomophagy. In the present study, the levels of organic contaminants (i.e. flame retardants, PCBs, DDT, dioxin compounds, pesticides) and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sn, Zn) were investigated in composite samples of several species of edible insects (greater wax moth, migratory locust, mealworm beetle, buffalo worm) and four insect-based food items currently commercialized in Belgium. The organic chemical mass fractions were relatively low (PCBs: 27-2065 pg/g ww; OCPs: 46-368 pg/g ww; BFRs: up to 36 pg/g ww; PFRs 783-23800 pg/g ww; dioxin compounds: up to 0.25 pg WHO-TEQ/g ww) and were generally lower than those measured in common animal products. The untargeted screening analysis revealed the presence of vinyltoluene, tributylphosphate (present in 75% of the samples), and pirimiphos-methyl (identified in 50% of the samples). The levels of Cu and Zn in insects were similar to those measured in meat and fish in other studies, whereas As, Co, Cr, Pb, Sn levels were relatively low in all samples (<0.03 mg/kg ww). Our results support the possibility to consume these insect species with no additional hazards in comparison to the more commonly consumed animal products.
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Easy Guide to Raising Mealworms Farm in 4 Steps for Beginners

Easy Guide to Raising Mealworms Farm in 4 Steps for Beginners | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Raising mealworms is something you need to consider seriously. They make tasty treats for any kind of feathered fowl that you may be raising on your homestead.

Most people raise mealworms for their chickens. I raise ducks and guinea fowl along with chickens, and they all love them.

It takes a small effort but could potentially save you a lot of money.

So if you are interested in learning how to raise more of your poultry’s food (even if you don’t have a lot of space), this could be the post you’ve been waiting on.
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Bug juice booze: How this product design duo is making their name in the alcohol game

Bug juice booze: How this product design duo is making their name in the alcohol game | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bug juice is a real thing.

Skeptical? So was I when I first tried Critter Bitters, the aromatic bitters made from crickets. I couldn’t get the idea of dirt, grass, and creepy crawlies out of my mind as I prepared to take my first sip. Of course I was just being ridiculous—the bitters do not resemble bugs in the slightest. The nutty, earthy taste is more akin to toasted walnuts or woodsmoke than anything that chirps.

That’s the point.

Critter Bitters aims to help people “get over the ‘ick’ factor associated with entomophagy, or eating insects,” according to co-founders Julia Plevin and Lucy Knops. The creative duo met while earning their MFAs in Product Design at The School of Visual Arts, and have since made a name for themselves in two tricky-to-navigate fields. Not only did they concoct a successful bug-based product, but they also carved a niche for themselves in the artisanal alcohol industry, an arena which remains largely male-dominated.
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These Restaurants Really Need You to Eat Bugs

These Restaurants Really Need You to Eat Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

"In Colorado’s Mile High City, edible bugs have been finding their way—purposefully!—onto the menus of a handful of top restaurants. There’s a chance they could be the next frontier of fine dining, at least in this highly experimental corner of the food world.
This should’t be too shocking—we’re talking about Colorado, after all, and the state’s capital has a history of welcoming new, somewhat risqué enterprises. It’s one of the fastest-growing cities in the country, home to a progressive startup environment attracting young entrepreneurs in search of lower housing costs, a higher quality of life, and a damn good meal. Denver’s brewing culture is that of legend: On any given day, Denver brews more beers than any other city in the nation. Plus, there’s plenty of weed to go around—Colorado was among the first two states to legalize the recreational use of marijuana—which is the sort of thing that might make eating $15 bug tacos sound not just reasonable but kinda amazing."

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Cooking with bugs

Cooking with bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Wendy Lu McGill the CEO/Founder of Rocky Mountain Micro Ranch shows us how to cook with bugs.
Rocky Mountain Micro Ranch (RMMR) is Colorado's first and only edible insect farm. Operating in a solar-heated shipping container, we raise crickets, mealworms and waxworms to sell to chefs and food makers, as well as offering edible insects from around the world.  They pitched Kirk and Dutra when they were here for a segment earlier this month. 

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Cricket Farming For Food and Feed

A presentation about tips and tricks for farming your own crickets for food or feed.
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Four new food products that are disrupting traditional supply chains | Jamie's Food Revolution | Jamie Oliver

Four new food products that are disrupting traditional supply chains | Jamie's Food Revolution | Jamie Oliver | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

  Cricket flour
Have you heard the buzz about an incredible new superfood on the market? It’s high in protein, vitamins and minerals, and it’s much more environmentally friendly than a lot of the foods you currently eat. It’s a flour you can mix into cakes, breads, smoothies, burgers, salads, and curries to make them pack an extra nutritional punch, and it won’t even affect the flavour. Sounds great, right? So why aren’t we fully embracing it?
Kelly Hagen, COO of Entomo Farms, is heavily involved in the production of the protein the flour is milled from: crickets.
“Our ancestors ate bugs, and two billion people around the world today still eat insects as part of their everyday diet. It makes sense – crickets are good for us and good for the planet,” Kelly says, although she’s aware of the challenges her product faces in the current marketplace.
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Novel food rules could see insect products banned - EU Food Law

Transitional rules for novel foods that are already approved after the 1 January 2018 switchover to the new regulation could see whole insects and insect products wiped from some markets if Member States do not apply the rules correctly, producers are warning.

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Microbiological analysis of raw edible insects | Journal of Insects as Food and Feed

Abstract
Relatively little is known about the microbiological quality of edible insects. In Germany, living insects are also bought from pet shops, rededicating thus a feedstuff to a foodstuff. A preliminary survey was conducted to assess the microbiological quality of these animals. Samples of raw insects (Acheta domesticus, Gryllus assimilis, Gryllus bimaculatus, Locusta migratoria, Blabtica dubia, Galleria mellonella, Chilecomadia moorei, Pachnoda marginata, Tenebrio molitor, Zophobas atratus, and Apis mellifera) from pet shops were analysed using classical food hygiene parameters (total aerobial mesophilic bacterial count (TBC), Enterobacteriaceae count (EC), staphylococci (SC), bacilli (BC), yeasts and moulds counts (YMC), salmonellae, Escherichia coli, and Listeria monocytogenes). They were also inoculated on blood agar for specific microbial identification.
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Our Crazy Tribe!

It is more than an interesting topic. It's who we are and the company of people we belong to. We love the world by serving and inspiring others to serve to make it better!

We are calling all humanitarians, pioneers, out of the box thinkers, insect eaters and world changers to join us.

Consider donating today! http://www.SeedsOfAction.com/
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New protein sources and food legislation: the case of edible insects and EU law

New protein sources and food legislation: the case of edible insects and EU law | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
Growing global food demand has generated a greater interest in the consumption of new and diversified protein sources. Novel foodstuffs represent a challenge for food law as they need proper safety assessments before obtaining market permission. The case of edible insects and European law is a good representation of this issue because a selection of food grade insect species may be available on the European market in the coming years. However, European legislation does not explicitly address edible insects. Consequently, this has left a grey area, allowing different interpretations of the legislation among Member States. The aim of this paper is to analyse the challenge of the safe management of edible insects in the context of the current legal framework. The current Novel Food legislation, as well as the forthcoming version of the legislation, will be analysed and discussed in relation to edible insects. Particular attention will be paid to the evolution of legislation and to the experiences of both EU and non-EU countries.
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Six-Time Award Winner Hargol FoodTech Completes Investment Round

Six-Time Award Winner Hargol FoodTech Completes Investment Round | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Hargol FoodTech took up the challenge of providing a protein alternative based on its proven technology and optimized methods to grow several species of grasshoppers quickly and under sanitary conditions. In field trials, the Company proved that the product has a 72% protein content level, contains all essential amino acids and a balanced ratio (1:1) of omega-3 and omega-6.

"Hargol FoodTech is the world's first commercial grasshopper farm. Our unique grasshopper protein, superior to any other protein source in nutritional content and efficiency, is attracting customers from all over the globe. The funds we raised will be used to expand our production capacity to meet the demand we have from the market," remarked Dror Tamir, CEO of Hargol FoodTech.

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TIME TO EMBRACE EATING INSECTS

ABOUT THE AUTHOR: SHAMI RADIA

Shami is Co-Founder of Eat Grub ltd (or Grub, for short). Before setting up Grub, Shami was Marketing Manager for the charity WaterAid. The idea of eating insects was introduced to Shami on a visit to Malawi with the charity, and he has not looked back since. His experience in marketing has given him a strong understanding of building relevant propositions and audience profiling as well as experience in developing, testing and taking new products to market.  His passion for marketing and sustainability made Grub the perfect venture. 
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Microbiological Load of Edible Insects Found in Belgium - Semantic Scholar

Microbiological Load of Edible Insects Found in Belgium - Semantic Scholar | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract

Edible insects are gaining more and more attention as a sustainable source of animal protein for food and feed in the future. In Belgium, some insect products can be found on the market, and consumers are sourcing fresh insects from fishing stores or towards traditional markets to find exotic insects that are illegal and not sanitarily controlled. From this perspective, this study aims to characterize the microbial load of edible insects found in Belgium (i.e., fresh mealworms and house crickets from European farms and smoked termites and caterpillars from a traditional Congolese market) and to evaluate the efficiency of different processing methods (blanching for all species and freeze-drying and sterilization for European species) in reducing microorganism counts. All untreated insect samples had a total aerobic count higher than the limit for fresh minced meat (6.7 log cfu/g). Nevertheless, a species-dependent blanching step has led to a reduction of the total aerobic count under this limit, except for one caterpillar species. Freeze-drying and sterilization treatments on European species were also effective in reducing the total aerobic count. Yeast and mold counts for untreated insects were above the Good Manufacturing Practice limits for raw meat, but all treatments attained a reduction of these microorganisms under this limit. These results confirmed that fresh insects, but also smoked insects from non-European trades, need a cooking step (at least composed of a first blanching step) before consumption. Therefore, blanching timing for each studied insect species is proposed and discussed.
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Eating Insects in Phuket - Phuket's Edible Bugs

Eating Insects in Phuket - Phuket's Edible Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eating insects in Thailand is one of the traditional challenges visitors face during a good night out, particularly in places like Bangkok’s Khao San Road and Phuket’s Bangla Road. However, edible bugs are also a popular choice for local Thais, being a light and surprisingly healthy snack. Once you get past the instinctive revulsion of putting creepy crawlies anywhere near your mouth, some are even quite moreish.

To help you on this unique culinary adventure, we’ve prepared the following list of the edible insects available in Phuket. You can find them at some of the night markets and a few established stalls around the island, but mostly from wandering vendors, especially near nightlife hotspots. We hope this information will give you some idea of what to expect when you take that first nervous nibble, as well as helping you pick the ones you’re more likely to successfully stomach!
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Reading it right on Novel Foods

The programme will look at the requirements of the incoming Regulation, the points expected to be of priority in future reviews of novel foods, and the potential effects of Regulation 2015/2283 on certain food categories already present on the market, with the status of insects and insect-derived products discussed as an example.

The possible implications of the UK’s exit from the EU on UK submissions that are already going through the novel foods process will be covered, as will the effect of this issue on future novel foods assessments by the UK.

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