Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Gastro grub on the menu for Imperial explorers - Benin

Gastro grub on the menu for Imperial explorers - Benin | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

A team led by Imperial students return from Benin, where they have been sampling the local bug life.

 

Eating cricket kebabs, collecting bugs with local villagers, and extending our knowledge of insect eating practices in Benin were all on the menu for a two-month expedition led by two Imperial students before Christmas.


Via Jacques Mignon
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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, January 24, 2013 4:43 AM
It was great to learn more not only about insects and how they fit into the Wama people’s lifestyles and traditions, but also about their environment and their culture in a wider sense. Eating insects after collecting them was also quite fun!

 – Rudi Verspoor

 

Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Why insect can save the world. Call for support to 2018 Global insect conference in China Shenzhen

Published on Sep 29, 2016
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Pulses, Grains and Insect Innovation at Food Matters Live

Pulses, Grains and Insect Innovation at Food Matters Live | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eat Grub’s cricket protein coconut and cacao energy bars fall under the ‘edible insects’ category, along with One Hop Kitchen’s Cricket Bolognese, Jimini’s Fruity Curry Grasshoppers, MicroNutris’ Thyme Flavoured Mealworms and Morphagy’s Whole Roasted Crickets.
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Strategic task force to help insect firms navigate novel food regulation

Strategic task force to help insect firms navigate novel food regulation | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The International Platform of Insects for Food and Feed (IPIFF) wants workable and consistent rules for insect producers across the EU and is setting up a strategic task force to help manufacturers navigate their way through EU regulation.
“The workability and predictability of EU authorisation procedures is key for insect producing companies,” IPIFF secretary general, Christophe Derrien told FoodNavigator.

“[Yet] IPIFF fears that member states diverging interpretations may create discriminations between producers depending on the country where they are located whilst entailing disruptive effects on trade,” 

One manufacturer, Bastien Rabastens, CEO and co-founder of French grub snack start-up company Jimini’s, confirmed that opinions vary among member states resulting in differing interpretations.

“The majority of them (member states) consider that 'whole insects’ and their preparations are already covered under the current novel food text and should therefore not benefit from the transitional measures. A few of them would be more open, such as the UK or the Netherlands,” he told FoodNavigator.  
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The Grubmeister: Why the Future of Food will Involve Eating Bugs

The Grubmeister: Why the Future of Food will Involve Eating Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
David George Gordon: That’s right. In our culture it’s like, “Get that damn thing out of the house!” But in Japan, for example, kids have pet beetles, and they take good care of them. I’ve even heard of kids burying their bugs that have died of old age in the backyard. In our culture, a beetle wouldn’t even make it into your bedroom, let alone be a prized possession. Around the world, particularly in countries that still have some connection with their indigenous roots, people eat insects. In Mexico, for example, they eat little caterpillars called gusanos de maguey. They eat chapulines, which are roasted and seasoned grasshoppers that are quite good. They eat all sorts of stuff—crickets, ant eggs, you name it—that are all pre-Hispanic foods that were eaten before settlement by Europeans.
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Entomophagy at the 2016 International Congress of Entomology

Entomophagy at the 2016 International Congress of Entomology | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Aaron Pomerantz, a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley, recently attended a symposium on entomophagy — the eating of insects — at the 2016 International Congress of Entomology.
In the following video, we see the reactions of people eating various types of insects, and watch as Aaron and his friend Amanda talk to the founder of Little Herds, a company that raises insects for food and feed. Aaron also talks to Florence Dunkel, the organizer of a symposium called “Industrialization of Insects as a Food Ingredient.”
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We need to think hard about having insects in our diet - New Zealand Listener

We need to think hard about having insects in our diet - New Zealand Listener | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Crickets are packed with protein, vitamins and minerals and farmed sustainably for the better health of the planet, which makes them a healthy, eco-friendly option. But can the benefits of entomophagy – the consumption of insects – outweigh the inherent “yuck” factor?
Our diet affects our health and that of our planet. More than 25% of greenhouse gases (GHGs) are produced by global agriculture and food production. Worse, agricultural intensification is driving biodiversity decline, which again affects sustainability on the planet, say Australian researchers. Of 8688 near-threatened or threatened species of flora and fauna, 62% were imperilled as the result of agricultural intensification, including Africa’s iconic cheetah, they noted in a recent issue of the journal Nature.
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Regional Edible Insect Industry Envisioned By Hopping Startup

Regional Edible Insect Industry Envisioned By Hopping Startup | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A food industry startup from Oregon is ready to sell you something completely different for your mid-morning snack. How about some roasted crickets in cayenne spice or original flavor?

Cricket Flours started by selling finely-ground crickets sourced from wholesalers in the Midwest and back East two years ago. The powder, which has a slightly nutty flavor, can be a protein supplement or gluten-free baking ingredient.

"There's been a lot of great market validation over the last year for the entire edible insect industry and also for our company Cricket Flours,” company founder and CEO Charles Wilson said.
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European push for more edible insects | Food & Beverage

European push for more edible insects | Food & Beverage | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
At its General Assembly meeting held on 19 September, IPIFF – the European Umbrella Organisation representing the interests of Insect Producers for Food and Feed – called for regulatory changes so as to authorise insect proteins as fish feed.  IPIFF also underlined the need for guidance & collaboration in the preparation of ‘novel food’ applications.

“IPIFF puts the safety of our food and feed first,” said Antoine Hubert, IPIFF President. The IPIFF members producing insects for the EU market only use plant based material as input, for which the European Food Safety Authority found no risk as long as producers comply with best hygiene practices for the rearing and processing of their animals (opinion from 8 October 2015).
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Edible Insects StartUp Awarded USDA Innovation Grant - The Food Rush

Edible Insects StartUp Awarded USDA Innovation Grant - The Food Rush | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bugeater Foods, a Nebraska based insect startup, has been awarded a Small Business Innovation Grant (SBIR) from the US Department of Agriculture. The startup will use the funding to conduct research on insect based foods, with a primary focus on extrusions such as rice, pasta and potentially other products.

The startup, formed by three University of Nebraska-Lincoln graduates back in 2015, aims to bring insect based food products to market. Their first product was a cricket powder protein shake, cleverly named Jump.
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VIDEO: Grubs up for real at ‘Pestaurant’ during national ploughing championships

VIDEO: Grubs up for real at ‘Pestaurant’ during national ploughing championships | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Diners at Rentokil’s pop-up Pestaurant will be spoiled for choice with an array of of creepy crawlies from an À la carte menu — all served free of charge.

The culinary delights include ham and cheese mealworms, chilli pepper crickets, ant chocolate rounds, roasted locusts, and grasshopper lolipops.

Managing Director of Rentokil Initial Ireland, Michael O’Mahoney, said Pestaurant is not only about enjoying a new culinary experience.
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Insects Could Be Your Next Diet Staple

Insects Could Be Your Next Diet Staple | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects are usually described as “gross,” “dirty,” “scary” or “disease carriers.” Among all the names people have given to them, “yummy” has never been a part of the vocabulary. However, this may no longer be the case.
You are not reading this wrong. Entomophagy, also known as bug-eating, has in fact become very popular in New York City. Chefs of the new generation dedicate their time to inventing thousands of insect-inspired dishes such as cricket flour cookies, grasshopper tacos, fried worms and rootworm beetle dip, to name a few.
Mario Hernandez, head chef of the Mexican restaurant The Black Ant, incorporates bugs into many of the dishes he creates.
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Should Insects Be Part of Your Healthy Diet?

Should Insects Be Part of Your Healthy Diet? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects can be pests and some can be beneficial to our ecosystem. But would you eat them? "Good Housekeeping" nutrition director Jackie London sheds light on Entomophagy, the practice of eating
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Bug Dinner at Grub Food Van

Bug Dinner at Grub Food Van | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Would you eat tempura-cricket san choy bao; black pudding with a mealworm crumb; and candied ants on blue-cheese parfait? At Grub Food Van's upcoming bug-inspired dinner, you can taste them all.

Drawing on themes from food films that are showcasing at Melbourne's Environmental Film Festival (such as Bugs on the Menu, Sustainable and Kubo’s Crickets), chef Ben Mac of The Social Food Project (he's previously worked at Supernormal and Top Paddock) will explore alternate and sustainable food options with his four-course menu. Each dish will be paired with a beverage.

Starts 6pm. Bookings essential.

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Eating Insects Becoming Fashionable

Eating Insects Becoming Fashionable | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects have been parts of human diets since prehistoric times, notwithstanding aversion against insect food in most Western cultures. Currently, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that some 2.000 different insect species are being used as food - supplementing the diet at least two billion people worldwide. 

Given that number, the recent estimate by market research firm PMR of a size of USD 720 million for the global edible insect market in 2024 appears much too low. It is possible that the estimate refers to processed insect foodstuffs only, while most insects are purchased on markets and prepared at home.
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Edible Insects Market Assessment Report Now Available at Credence Research - The Republic of East Vancouver

Edible Insects Market Assessment Report Now Available at Credence Research - The Republic of East Vancouver | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Credence Research has recently issued a new market assessment report titled “Edible Insects – Growth, Future Prospects and Competitive Analysis, 2016 – 2022”. The global Edible Insects Market study provides a comprehensive view of the ongoing and future phases of the Edible Insects industry based on parameters such as major commercial events, research initiatives, government guidelines, market drivers, restraints and opportunities and detailed industry segmentation and regional distribution.

Browse the report at http://www.credenceresearch.com/report/edible-insects-market

Based on geographic/regional distribution the global Edible Insects Market is studied for key regional markets focusing on the respective geographic trends and statistics, and thereby delivering market size and forecast values. The Edible Insects Market based on geographic classification is studied for North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and Middle East and Africa markets. Among these, the North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific Edible Insects Market is studied for top country-level markets. The Edible Insects industry in each individual country market is studied based on parameters such as per capita income, population, gross domestic product (GDP), status of infrastructure, purchasing power parity, etc. Technology development, industry concentration, end-user preference, and similar such grounds are also considered while estimating the market for Edible Insects. The market estimates are provided for the period 2014-2022, along with corresponding compounded annual growth rates (CAGRs) for the forecast period 2016-2022.
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Dine on bugs—and wine—at the insect-driven Scary Delicious event

Dine on bugs—and wine—at the insect-driven Scary Delicious event | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Before you get squeamish about worms in your food, know this: plenty of people around the world incorporate bugs into their meals. Even in L.A., cricket-garnished cocktails have been popping up with more frequency on bar menus. Protein, guys, protein.

Aly Moore knows all this. She's the founder of Bugible, a blog dedicated to educating people about the benefits of eating bugs, and she wants to take you on a journey of crickets, mealworms, scorpions and ants, all paired with six boutique wines curated by Michael Consbruck at V Wine Room. Scary Delicious takes place on October 23 at 4pm and October 26 at 8pm—both at the wine room in West Hollywood—and is a chance to expose adventurous diners to a brand (and brave?) new world. Early bird tickets cost $55 (which ends on October 3), while regular tickets cost $60; a portion of the proceeds will go toward Little Herds, a nonprofit organization that educates people about the benefits of edible bugs. 
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Edible insects: Beyond the novelty factor

Edible insects: Beyond the novelty factor | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

If the edible insects market is heating up, and big name retailers from Publix to Sprouts are now stocking cricket bars, snacks and protein powders, why is Whole Foods – which has reportedly temporarily dropped all bug-based products - apparently cooling down?  
The retailer has not officially confirmed reports that it has dropped all edible-insect-based products, and has not responded to calls or emails from FoodNavigator-USA seeking to clarify whether this is a temporary move while it formalizes its internal approvals procedures for insect-based foods (what we’re hearing from some sources), or a reflection of its lack of belief in the edible insects category.

So what’s going on?

One source told us that selected Whole Foods regions had unilaterally started stocking some bug-based products before Whole Foods Global had developed a structure for how to approve them and so the company opted to step back – and pull the products from shelves – until it developed some core standards around how it might approve these new foods at an institutional level.

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One of Mexico City’s Hottest Dining Trends? Eating Insects

One of Mexico City’s Hottest Dining Trends? Eating Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects are becoming a hot dining trend—but one that tends to focus on sustainability and nutrition over taste or presentation. Whole deep-fried tarantulas and sautéed beetle larvae are not, after all, everyone’s cup of tea.
Here’s the thing about the whole (bug) enchilada: The optics are terrible. Most people don’t want these things in their house, let alone their mouth. But Mexico City has a long-standing tradition of eating insects as a delicacy, and in many places they’re served in a much more subtle and appealing way—including in sauces and cocktails.

Ubish Yaren, a local guide who leads Intrepid Travel’s Real Food Adventure-Mexico, says that the eating of insects dates back to pre-Hispanic times. “Why do you start eating insects or cactus or things with spines? Because of need,” says Yaren. “But now, insects are one of the most expensive ingredients in Mexican cuisine.” The commitment to insects ties in with both an emphasis on local and heritage items in Mexico City’s dining scene, and the elevation of simple ingredients—as we’ve seen, all over the world, with humble vegetables.
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Vt. family raises crickets for human consumption

Vt. family raises crickets for human consumption | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
WILLISTON, Vt. -
In the basement of the Swanson house, you will find something unique.

"We are, as far as we are aware, the first in Vermont and New England. There are only four or five cricket farms for human consumption in North America," said Steve Swanson from Tomorrow's Harvest Farm. 

That's right, human consumption. Swanson and his wife, Jen, as new parents, were concerned about the food they were serving their family. They learned about the benefits of crickets a couple of years ago.

"So, when I came across a report that the U.N. released in 2013 which was about edible insects and how they are the solution to climate change and global hunger and that was the lightbulb moment, that report was the lightbulb moment," said Swanson. 

They are now growing a couple of hundred thousand crickets on their basement farm.

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'It's got a savoury umami' - Watch customers tasting insects at the Rentokil Pestaurant

'It's got a savoury umami' - Watch customers tasting insects at the Rentokil Pestaurant | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Customers at the Rentokil Pestaurant have been chowing-down on some interesting nibbles at an event in London.
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Strong growth forecast for global edible insects market - Food In Canada

Strong growth forecast for global edible insects market - Food In Canada | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The global market for edible insects is expected to experience healthy growth between now and 2024, according to recent findings from Persistence Market Research (PMR), a New York-based market research company.

PMR’s report forecasts that the global edible insect market will increase to US$722.9 million by the end of 2024, up from US$423.8 million in 2016, with the expected CAGR (compound annual growth rate) for market expansion at around 6.1 per cent.

According to PMR, the lower production costs of insect-based products compared to chicken, beef, and pork will continue to be one of the key drivers pushing this market growth. The growing popularity of edible insect-based products as a substitute for egg and dairy proteins is also playing a key role in the rising demand, along with increasing awareness about the ecological upside of eating insects. There’s also less of a risk of food safety problems with edible insects (compared to some other proteins), which will help fuel the growth as well.

Growth is expected both in terms of edible insects as a whole (i.e. not ground up, etc.) and as an ingredient in other food products, with insects appearing as an ingredient in drinks, insect confectionery, snacks, baked products and more.
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SupermarketGuru - Arachnophobia Is Coming To Your Kitchen

SupermarketGuru - Arachnophobia Is Coming To Your Kitchen | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Learn how to shop for groceries smarter, eat healthier, and live better. With new food product video reviews, recipes, food allergy information, grocery coupons, tips and deals, Phil Lempert alerts customers and business leaders to impending corporate and consumer trends, and empowers them to make educated purchasing and marketing decisions.
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These grasshopper tacos are so good that eating them won’t feel like a dare

These grasshopper tacos are so good that eating them won’t feel like a dare | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The rendition at Lezo's Taqueria in Mt. Pleasant may even be better than the one at Oyamel.
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It's good that food economy has bugs in the system

It's good that food economy has bugs in the system | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I ate a bug smoothie last month. On purpose.

At the first-ever Crain's Food Summit in Detroit's Eastern Market, we invited a handful of food entrepreneurs from around the state to "pitch" to potential investors.

One of them was Detroit Ento, which offers "sustainable protein" — aka bugs — that can be mixed with a number of things, from sauces to smoothies. Plus, they are "locally sourced." Yum! But consider it's two times the protein power of beef.

Actually, the smoothie was good. The bugs added a bit of texture. And they expanded my view of how Michigan can add some badly needed manufacturing and processing jobs to, dare I say, our economic food chain.
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Brisbane Program

Brisbane Program | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

BUGS ON THE MENU

Friday, October 14, 2016
6:15pm 8:30pm
New Farm Six Cinemas
DIR. IAN TOEWS | CANADA | 2016 | 78MINS

Bugs on the Menu asks us to reconsider the dietary choices that many of us take for granted every day by presenting a prescient and informative study of the health and environmental benefits of eating insects.

PANEL DISCUSSION: This screening includes a panel discussion. Panelists announced soon.

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