Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Congo : N’arrêtez pas de manger des insectes!

Congo : N’arrêtez pas de manger des insectes! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Termites, larves chrysalides… contiennent plus de protéines et d’oligo-éléments que le poisson ou la viande. En Afrique Centrale et de l’Ouest, ces petites bêtes sont dégustées crus, frites ou séchées… Récoltées en zone rurale, elles se vendent cher sur les marchés, alors pourquoi pas développer des élevages ? C’est un enjeu de sécurité alimentaire. Un reportage d'Anne-Cécile Bras pour RFI.


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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Diary of a Bugs Journey - Invenire Market Intelligence

Diary of a Bugs Journey - Invenire Market Intelligence | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Can edible bugs have a real impact? Insects need to become big. For our sake, and for our planet. Follow our journey to revolutionise food production
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Edible insects is just one dream. And just one journey.

Taking up the challenge to create a better future is not a simple journey. There are challenges, hurdles and tests of commitment.

But the journey is also one of growth, new skills and deeper understanding. The path contains new friends and partners with common visions. And the destination is a better world with your dream a reality.

 

Anyone can be a Leader. You just have to start your journey."

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Roasted crickets for dinner, anyone?

Protein choices at a meal usually include fish, beef or chicken. Maybe tofu, if the chef wants to make vegetarians happy. 

Next week, Scratch Food & Beverage will dish up a different kind of option: crickets and mealworms.

On Aug. 31, the Troy Hill restaurant is hosting the city’s first-ever insect dinner party with a four-course menu by executive chef Matt Petruna that will shine a spotlight on the six-legged creepy crawlies and slithering larvae that most Americans consider unpalatable.

The word “think” is important, because roasted crickets and mealworms actually can taste quite delicious if they’re prepared right, says owner Don Mahaney. For his dinner, that means insects that have been processed into a tofu-like block that can be used as an egg, dairy, meat or soy replacement.

“It’s very similar to ground beef,” Mr. Mahaney says.

They’re also extremely nutritious, offering both protein and a good source of unsaturated fat. Insects also supply a small amount of iron and other minerals, depending on size. 
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Is it Time to Start Eating Insects?

Estimates say that insects form a part of the traditional diets of at least 2 billion people, according to a study conducted by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Yet, here in Western countries, bugs continue to carry a certain negative stigma, as shown in our modern culture and mainstream media. Picture the scene in Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom where Willie sarcastically responds, “I had bugs for lunch,” while witnessing a crawly dinner scene in the Pankot Palace. That apprehension is rooted more in misguided methodology than real facts or personal experience.
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BUGS in Denmark: nationwide in 50 cinemas with DOXBIO

BUGS in Denmark: nationwide in 50 cinemas with DOXBIO | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
This September we will collaborate with DOXBIO in order to make BUGS widely available to the Danish people – in cinemas all over the country. Every year, distribution initiative DOXBIO showcases six documentary films in collaboration with a nationwide network of cinemas. It’s DOXBIO’s mission to bring documentaries to big screens all over the country – not just the big cities.
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Edible Insects Market: Global Analysis, Size, Share, Value, Demand, Market Growth By 2024

Edible Insects Market: Global Analysis, Size, Share, Value, Demand, Market Growth By 2024 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In terms of value, the global edible insects market is anticipated to expand at a CAGR of 6.1% during the forecast period and is expected to account for US$ 722.9 Mn by 2024 end. Orthoptera (cricket, grasshopper, and locusts) segment is projected to register a CAGR of 8.1% over the forecast period, driven by rising demand for cricket granola bars, cricket crackers, cricket cookies, and cricket chocolates. Of the various edible insect type products, the beetle's segment is estimated to account for approximately 30.8% share of the global market share in 2016, and caterpillars segment is estimated to account for 17.9% share. 

In the APAC region, beetles segment accounted for largest market share at 34.1% in 2015. Revenue contribution by this segment to the APAC edible insect market is expected to increase at a CAGR of 5.2% from 2016 to 2024. In terms of value, the beetles segment in the Europe edible insects market accounted for 29.0% share in 2015. Demand for edible insects in countries in Europe is on
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Edible Insects of Northeast India - Springer

Edible Insects of Northeast India - Springer | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
Insects play an important role in the dietary system of various ethnic groups of northeastern states of India. They provide nutritional security and cure various body ailments. The number of edible insects eaten in a state varies with the land and tribes. The ethnic people of Arunachal Pradesh consume about 158 species of insects, whereas tribes of Nagaland consume only 42 species of insects. The members of various tribes choose the edible insects on the basis of their traditional belief, taste and regional and seasonal availability. This chapter outlines various insect species eaten by various tribes, the association of these insects with social and cultural belief and their importance in medicine and economy of these states.
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Grub Launches Energy Bar Made with Cricket Powder - The Food Rush

Grub Launches Energy Bar Made with Cricket Powder - The Food Rush | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The energy bars are packed full of natural goodness, and an extra special ingredient: cricket powder. Crickets are incredibly high in protein, iron and calcium and contain all nine essential amino acids. They are rightly being talked about as the food of the future and they’re here now, in a handy-sized snack bar.

The Eat Grub Bar comes in two flavours: cranberry and orange, and coconut and cacao. Both are packed full of protein but also packed full of flavour. Alongside the cricket powder, the bars contain whole ingredients such as sunflower seeds, currants, chopped dates, gluten free oat-bran, goji berries and pumpkin seeds. These added ingredients give the bars some really great texture as well as fantastic flavour.
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Are Crickets The New Lobster? The Case For Eating Insects

Are Crickets The New Lobster? The Case For Eating Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Some think Americans will develop a taste for creepy-crawlies, just as we learned to enjoy other foods we once scorned. In 1876, the lobsters that were abundant along the coastlines of North America were still being used as fertilizer for farmland; in Eastern Canada, “they boil them for their pigs, but are ashamed to be seen eating lobster themselves,” wrote the essayist John Rowan at the time. Lobster shells inside a house would be seen as evidence of “poverty and degradation,” he said.
So could the day come when people see our aversion to eating bugs as an unenlightened cultural oddity of our time?
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Insects: The Grossly Sustainable Future of Food

Insects: The Grossly Sustainable Future of Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Many cultures already include this ingredient in their daily diets, but for most of the Western world, the very thought of ingesting it brings on a montage of involuntary facial expressions. But this one divisive ingredient may just be the future of food.

Of course, I’m talking about insects. I spoke with Lara Hanlon of éntomo, an organization purporting the value of entomophagy (the practice of eating insects) by providing information, stats, and recipes.

In an effort to understand a little better why it’s good for our global wallets, welfare, and taste-buds, here are some reasons why insects might just be our saviors.
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Can edible insects save the world?

Can edible insects save the world? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Because producing insects for consumption takes up much less land and produces far less gas than livestock, the environmental impact is thought to be lower. Add to this insects’ nutritional value, and some people are claiming that the mass consumption of insects is the solution to our food and climate problems.

There are around 2037 documented edible insect species – and counting. Wageningen University keep an updated list on their website. With many established cultures and traditions around the foraging and consumption of insects, and countless recipes and techniques, it is sometimes framed as a resource we should be ‘tapping into’.
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Alton Brown on the End of Meat as We Know It

Alton Brown on the End of Meat as We Know It | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN recently published a paper marshaling evidence that insect protein can be used to make things like sausage. And let’s not forget, NASA is funding a food “printer” that we can only assume will be able and willing to fab a faux T-bone at the push of a button.
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First TABLE: Alternative Proteins at Scratch

First TABLE: Alternative Proteins at Scratch | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
We are thrilled to be the first to announce that Scratch Food and Beverage is rolling out a menu of “alternative proteins” – bugs!
 

We broke the story in our fall issue (which is heading to newsstands now) and OUR READERS get the first taste of this new menu, “for the adventurous eater and the everyday diner alike.” This exciting offering is part of a new {made from} Scratch program, which is all about introducing new, sustainable, delicious ingredients and techniques to the market.
 

Fun Fact: Insect protein is more nutritious and takes up less land and natural resources than traditional animal protein. Oh, and it’s delicious. TABLE’s Drew Cranisky compared the taste to mushrooms, pistachios, shrimp, and even bacon. 
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Crickets... They're What's for Dinner

Crickets... They're What's for Dinner | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Iowa’s first cricket farm that’s producing crickets for human consumption is up and running. Becky Herman is a co-founder of Iowa Cricket Farmer, and she says right now, she’s got nearly 200,000 cricket living in blue bins at the farm. She’s a school teacher and said the idea came to her in the classroom.

“We were watching CNN back in late September and watched a segment on a cricket farmer in Ohio, who were one of the pioneers in this. He was showing around a reporter around his cricket farm which was in a warehouse,” Herman explains.
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Silicon Valley’s power brain food: Crickets

Silicon Valley’s power brain food: Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
SAN JOSE, Calif. — For Bay Area techies attuned to the latest trends, kale is no longer cutting it and quinoa is passe. Instead, many are opting for a six-legged snack.
In startup offices around the region, people are munching on crickets.
Proponents say the tiny, chirping bugs are high in protein and iron and can serve as a sustainable alternative to beef or chicken. It's a movement that has people buzzing, with companies such as San Francisco-based Bitty Foods baking the bugs into cookies and chips, Tiny Farms in San Leandro breeding crickets for mass consumption, and New York-based Exo using them in protein bars. The products are showing up in Silicon Valley break rooms, and investors and entrepreneurs are paying close attention.
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Grubbly Farms Takes On Food Sustainability with Flies - Hypepotamus

Grubbly Farms Takes On Food Sustainability with Flies - Hypepotamus | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Grubbly Farms, an innovative food startup, takes on our current food sustainability problem with the help of black soldier flies. The startup sells the fly’s dehydrated larvae as a more sustainable protein and fat-heavy animal feed. They are transforming the industry.

In 2015, Georgia Tech graduates and cousins Sean Warner and Patrick Pittaluga ordered 700 larvae of black soldier flies from Amazon and started growing them after reading about the large cultivation of insects in Europe and Asia. Warner and Pittaluga feed pre-consumer food waste from local organizations to the flies and as they eat it, the flies convert it into quality fertilizer. The larvae the flies produce is then harvested, dehydrated and sold as backyard chicken treats.
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This year's Great Cornish Food Festival has added crunch

This year's Great Cornish Food Festival has added crunch | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

By West Briton West Briton  |  Tue 23 Aug 2016
Among the traditional treats on offer in the huge Food Hall at this year's Great Cornish Food Festival will be some interesting new additions… Insects.

Yep, you read that right. Next to the fancy sausages, artisan cheese, beer, cider and cake creations, will be bugs.

As in BUGS.

Former university lecturer Fred McVittie from Cornish Edible Insects will be at the event highlighting just how meal worms, cricket flour and other insects can be used to create a veritable bug banquet.
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Musadye zitete: Malawians warned to keep away from ‘locusts’ | Malawi24 - All the latest Malawi news

Musadye zitete: Malawians warned to keep away from ‘locusts’ | Malawi24 - All the latest Malawi news | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
According to Illovo, there is a high chance that some of the locusts being sold in the market are the ones that they killed after they invaded their field. Such insects have been said to contain harmful poison which can in turn kill people.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Last month state President Peter Mutharika was accused of telling Malawians that they should be eating insects as a way of beating the hunger situation in the country. Government spokesperson Patricia Kaliati said that the President was only joking on the issue."

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2016 CNE Menu Includes Bug Dogs, Beetle Juice and Pig Ear Sandwiches - Chew Boom

2016 CNE Menu Includes Bug Dogs, Beetle Juice and Pig Ear Sandwiches - Chew Boom | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Here’s a closer look at some of this year’s CNE culinary curiosities:

BUG BISTRO: Bug Bistro will be presenting its “bug-worthy” menu starring the Bug Dog: a hormone-free beef frank seasoned with crispy mustard crickets; Tacos Grillos: flour tortilla tacos with chipotle fried beef sirloin and toasted chilli lime crickets; and a Beetle Juice packed mango pulp, fresh lime, buttermilk and protein from roasted mealworm powder. (Bug Bistro, Food Building)
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Cricket tortillas, anyone?

Cricket tortillas, anyone? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It's not chewy, there's no horrible aftertaste, and no legs are sticking out of the sides.

In fact, it's quite the opposite: It's crispy, delicate, golden brown.

And filled with crickets.

Mexico restaurant in Hamilton has welcomed a new item to its menu, cricket tortillas.
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The Future of Sports Nutrition May Contain Insects

The Future of Sports Nutrition May Contain Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What do you get when you combine a shared passion for outdoor sports, nature, and healthy food? Fit people. Fit people who have great ideas… like making protein bars out of crickets.

William Walcker, Minh-Anh Pham, and Antoine Domergue are the three men who woke up one morning and decided they would make protein bars out of crickets. Kidding – it’s a much more interesting story than that.  I had the pleasure of speaking with Minh to hear a little more about how he went from triathlete to cricket evangelist.
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Santo Remedio serves up ‘proper’ Mexican street food - including grasshoppers

Santo Remedio serves up ‘proper’ Mexican street food - including grasshoppers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
You’re going to be ok, it’s like eating peanuts,” my friend coaxed me, as I contemplated spooning the grasshoppers past my lips, which were on top of the guacamole sitting in front of me in Santo Remedio.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"....felt genuinely nervous at the prospect of eating the protein-rich fried insects – despite knowing it would be a noble practice to adopt, and could eradicate world hunger if everyone followed suit.

I wouldn’t say the consistency was nutty, but they were certainly crunchy - and the fact they were accompanied by one of the best guacamoles I’d ever tasted eased the experience."

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Bug restaurant scoops award for local produce

Bug restaurant scoops award for local produce | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A ST Davids restaurant which serves up edible insects is one of two north Pembrokeshire businesses who have been congratulated for the outstanding quality of their food or drink in the annual Pembrokeshire Produce Mark Awards.
The Grub Kitchen was one of two winners of Best Use of Local Produce in a Hospitality Outlet.
Gwaun Valley Meats, which started out as a small family-run butchers firm in 2003, won the Best Online Marketing of Pembrokeshire Produce award.
The winners were presented with their awards at the Pembrokeshire Agricultural Show, yesterday (Wednesday).
Best-known for dishing up delicacies involving insects, Grub Kitchen at St Davids also promotes sustainable local produce.
Run by chef Andy Holcroft, Grub Kitchen is located on The Bug Farm, a working farm research centre and visitor attraction in St Davids that provides the restaurant with the majority of the produce its serves, such as Welsh Black beef, Welsh lamb and a range of vegetables.
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Could bugs be the meat of the future?

Could bugs be the meat of the future? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
WE’VE all heard about the apparent health benefits of eating your own placenta, but how about the creepy crawlies that you’re always trying to get rid of in your backyard.
By 2050, the UN expects the world population to reach nine billion, meaning worldwide meat shortages could become a reality.
But never fear — insects are here.
Insect consumption could be the new culinary trend to resolve the meat shortage problem that is expected to occur.
A book published by the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations said entomophagy, or eating insects, has many nutritional and environmental benefits.
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Eating Bugs With Boise Weekly

Published on Aug 19, 2016
Boise Weekly Editor-in-Chief Zach Hagadone, Graphic Designer Jeff Lowe and Boise Brewing bartender Erin Hicks talked bugs and sampled some crunchy critters with Brian Ellsworth, of Gemtek Pest Control, which is hosting a "Pestaurant" for Bug Day at the Idaho Botanical Garden on Saturday, Aug. 20.
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Insects: Coming soon to a plate near you

Insects: Coming soon to a plate near you | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Fancy a quivering shrimp covered with ants?

How about cricket crepes with bamboo worm fudge ice cream, or if you’re looking for a little more sting, scorpion scaloppine?

The next big food trend isn’t growing in your garden, but you could find it crawling around in there.

It might be hard for some of us to swallow, but creepy crawlies including crickets, grasshoppers, silkworm, scorpions, bamboo worms, wasp larvae and ants are becoming the future of food.
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SENS protein bars and energy bars - Kickstarter video

Published on Aug 17, 2016
NOW ON KICKSTARTER! --- THE MOST INNOVATIVE PROTEIN AND ENERGY BARS MADE WITH CRICKET FLOUR
Our web page: sensbar.com
Our Kickstarter campaign: sensbar.com/kickstarter
Support us on Kickstarter to bring this project to life!
We make only delicious and nutritious bars.
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