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ETES-VOUS PRET A VOUS NOURRIR D'INSECTES ?

ETES-VOUS PRET A VOUS NOURRIR D'INSECTES ? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
INSECTES. LA NOURRITURE DU FUTUR Postée le 18/10/2012 à 14h45 Faire bombance d'un ragoût de sauterelles ? Pas très appétissant... Il faudra pourtant peut-être s
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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CLICK HERE to support Roadmap: Edible insects & business opportunities

CLICK HERE to support Roadmap: Edible insects & business opportunities | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Exploring the possible markets and business opportunities insects have as food and protein sources. | Crowdfunding is a democratic way to support the fundraising needs of your community. Make a contribution today!
Ana C. Day's insight:
Via this campaign, we want to do 2 important things:

In order to really matter and make a difference, the edible insects industry needs to reach much bigger consumer groups than today. We think that for it to achieve a wide sustainability impact, it needs a roadmap. 

That is why we’ve started this campaign – we want to do two important things:



  1. Produce and publish a business opportunity report. The aim of the work is to present a clear view of where the edible insects market is right now, but most importantly, show the roadmap of how it can develop forward into a more mainstream market with greater positive impact. 
  2. Support the little team of 4Ento in their important educational work to increase awareness and familiarise people with edible insects so that more and more people become aware of the opportunities edible insects provide, and also dare to try insects themselves! If we in some way can help change makers like 4Ento in their quest for more sustainable – responsible business – we’ll do our best!
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Edible insects are nutritious and some say delicious - YouTube

LEAD IN : People often see six-legged insects as pests, exotic and something they would never put on their plates...but the United Nations Food and Agricultu...
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Crickets: They’re What’s for Dinner | The California Report | KQED News

Crickets: They’re What’s for Dinner | The California Report | KQED News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Could cricket-packed cookies and milkshakes be the next big food trend?
Ana C. Day's insight:

"It’s up to companies to determine whether the food they’re making is safe to eat, and the Food and Drug Administration will get involved if that comes into question. So far, no one’s asked them to investigate, including Elliot Mermel and the guys at Coalo Valley Farms. They think the moment for insects has arrived, especially in food-obsessed Los Angeles.

“It’s a new ingredient for chefs to play around with, it’s a new ingredient for food-centric individuals to try out,” Mermel says. “You don’t have to go to Mexico or Southeast Asia to try it. You can try something new right here in LA.”

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Bug's Life: Edible Insect Industry Facing New EU Regulation

Bug's Life: Edible Insect Industry Facing New EU Regulation | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Unless they've been eaten since 1997, creepy crawlies will have to undergo rigorous safety testing.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The FSA spokesperson says the agency is "conscious of the potential impact these proposals could have on businesses" and says they have written to affected companies to help them prepare for the regulations.

The sale of edible insects in Europe is currently subject to a patchwork of regulation. The Commission already requires parts or extracts of insects sold as food —such as crickets' wings— to be tested for safety and approved as novel foods. However, the sale of whole edible insects—such as an entire cricket, wings intact— is governed by national regulations. Belgium became the first EU country to officially approve the sale of 10 species of insect at the end of 2013, and a major Dutch supermarket chain began stocking insect products towards the end of last year as the Netherlands liberalised its laws. Other countries, such as Luxembourg, have been unwilling to relax laws on edible insects and require all insect products to undergo extensive testing and attain EU authorisation before being sold."

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Insects for dinner? Adelaide researchers to gauge attitudes towards eating bugs

Insects for dinner? Adelaide researchers to gauge attitudes towards eating bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Can Australians ever be persuaded to throw a cockroach on the barbie?


Researchers also say in an increasingly crowded world insects are cheap to raise and feed and could be an emerging agricultural industry.

"Growth in the middle-classes of developing countries has significantly increased global demand for high quality animal protein, while concerns over food security have stimulated interest in alternate sources of protein," she said.

"Even if the domestic market completely rejects edible insects, it's quite possible that other countries around the world may look to Australia as a source of these edible insects," she said.

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New study - How happy are Aussies to eat insects?

New study - How happy are Aussies to eat insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Would you fancy a crunchy cricket salad? Or perhaps a mealworm omelette? What about a cockroach sandwich?

Investigating consumer perceptions and attitudes to eating insects is the subject of a new University of Adelaide research project starting at the University’s Waite campus in August with an online consumer survey.

“Growth in the middle-classes of developing countries has significantly increased global demand for high quality animal protein, while concerns over food security have stimulated interest in alternate sources of protein,” says project leader Associate Professor Kerry Wilkinson, from the University’s School of Agriculture, Food and Wine.

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Crickets? Could they be healthy and delicious?

Crickets? Could they be healthy and delicious? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Hopper Foods has three Paleo friendly nutrient rich granola mixes made with cricket flour. Bugs can taste great.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The folks at Hopper Foods have made it their mission to make eating bugs a normal part of the Western table because it’s healthy for humans and good for the planet. And let’s face it, Westerners are late to the party when comes to entomophagy. Eighty percent of the world’s population eats bugs as a normal part of their diet. Is there anyone who shouldn’t eat crickets or cricket flour? Yes, those with allergies to other arthropods – invertebrate animals with exoskeletons, segmented bodies and jointed appendages such as lobster, shrimp and crab should not eat crickets or other insects."

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Cooking up new-style menus with insects - YouTube

The speciality dish at the Sandia Mexican restaurant in Toulouse, France. Called Los Gusanos this traditional Mexican dish translates to English as ...worms....
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Inside cutting-edge protein alternatives — algae and insects

Inside cutting-edge protein alternatives — algae and insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What's next on the protein horizon may shock consumers.
Ana C. Day's insight:
"Munching on insects

Want a protein bar where the protein comes from cricket powder? Exo Inc of Brooklyn, New York, and Chapul of Salt Lake City, Utah, both have you covered. The companies are two of about 25 U.S. and Canadian food manufacturers currently using cricket powder in food products.

Entomophagy — the fancy term for eating insects — is still a novelty in the U.S. and most Western countries, although Blueshift Research's March 2015 Trend Tracker found that one-third of respondents were likely to buy an insect-based product."

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Bug festival to promote nutritional value of edible insects - YouTube

1. Spiders being shown to visitors 2. Child with spider in hand 3. Spider in child's hand 4. Visitor with spider on arm 5. Cutaway visitors watching "(Cock)r...
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Just how big can bug-ranching grow?

Just how big can bug-ranching grow? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Today, growing insects for food is a fringe phenomenon. And unless we can figure out ways to bring down the price of edible bugs, it may stay that way.
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What London Drinks Would You Pair With Insects?

What London Drinks Would You Pair With Insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From super foods to organic wine, The 5/2 Diet to juicing, London loves a food fad. The next big thing to hit our over-stimulated tastebuds is entomophagy — or eating insects.
Ana C. Day's insight:
Meantime London Pale Ale and... Queen Weaver Ant

Has a hint of almonds that would suit a pale ale.

The Collins and... Silk Worms

They have a fishy flavour so the lemon should really complement this — like lemon on grilled sole.

London Dry Gin and... Crickets

It depends on the tonic but crickets are pretty flavourless so they should not overpower the gin.

Fuller's Chiswick Bitter and... Sago Worms

The worms have a hint of smoky coffee mocha — almost like a pork scratching.

Black Velvet and... Black Ants

The ants taste a bit like Bovril —

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Two-Minute NutraNews Break -- Edible Insects - Prepared Foods Videos

Two-Minute NutraNews Break -- Edible Insects - Prepared Foods Videos | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Two-Minute NutraNews Break -- Edible Insects

David Feder discusses honest-to-goodness bugs in the diet. It's buzz-worthy, but can it evolve into a sustained trend in the United States?

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With lab-grown meat, can we have our animals and eat them too?

With lab-grown meat, can we have our animals and eat them too? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Of course, we don’t know what our cyborg progeny will be eating decades from now: Insects? Soylent? Plant blood? Maybe cultured meat will revolutionize the meat industry, or maybe it’ll turn out to be just another overhyped fantasy. Either way, perhaps the most constructive thing we can do now is simply consider the possibility and face up to our strategic ignorance in the process. And we’re sorry, but that means you may just have to walk away from the hot dog stand.

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Edible Insects and Consumer Litigation

Edible Insects and Consumer Litigation | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I have been blogging about government regulations in the US on edible insects. Current thinking is the the FDA/regulators will not press edible insects companies to stop making products. US Regulat...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Top 4 concerns for consumer litigation related to edible insects.

  1. Physical hazards – For example, dry roasted whole cicadas can be a choking hazard. 
  2. Asphyxia– Insect are a potential food allergen. More info on insect allergens.
  3. Antinutrients – Not well studied and would be difficult to prove harm.
  4. Claims –
    1. Nutrient claims – The nutrition facts panel of a processed food need to be accurate......"
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5 questions: The bug chef

5 questions: The bug chef | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When David George Gordon talks about eating insects, he doesn't mean a few chocolate-covered ants or some roasted grasshoppers. He's way beyond that.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"On Aug. 8 and 9 at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University, the author of the Eat-a-Bug Cookbook will whip up scorpion scaloppine, deep-fried tarantula, and other dishes that even the most adventuresome eaters might find challenging. He'll nevertheless be offering tastes.

Gordon, who lives in Seattle and gives buggy cooking demonstrations nationwide, will be in town for the academy's annual Bug Fest, which for the weaker of heart - or palate - also will have bugs that visitors can merely touch or just observe in all their wiggliness."

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The Smart Gastronomy Lab Pushes the Boundaries of 3D Printed Food

The Smart Gastronomy Lab Pushes the Boundaries of 3D Printed Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Following their support of the first International Conference on Food 3D Printing, Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech and the Smart Gastronomy Lab at the University of Liège say the 3D printer may well be the “microwave of tomorrow.”

The full vision includes a day when hungry people download recipes with a smartphone and then print their way through a a menu via their dedicated food 3D printer in their own kitchens.

“3D Printing Food is an opportunity to develop new ingredients, such as insects and algae, which are not very appetizing but have a clear nutritional interest because of their important protein intake and their abundant production,” says Dorothée Goffin of the Smart Gastronomy Lab. “They can be printed in 3D with new shapes and textures that resemble the products that we already know. “
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Edible Insect Survey

Edible Insect Survey | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

This survey is part of a University of Adelaide funded research project led by A/Prof Kerry Wilkinson, titled ‘Consumer perceptions, sensory appeal and nutritional value of edible insects: realising the potential of an emerging agricultural industry’. A/Prof Wilkinson is an academic in the University’s School of Agriculture, Food and Wine and she can be contacted via email: kerry.wilkinson@adelaide.edu.au

The purpose of this survey is to determine participants’ attitudes towards edible insects.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"The survey will take approximately 5 to 10 minutes to complete. Your consent to participate is implied by completing the survey but your responses will remain confidential (stored securely within an online database at the University of Adelaide for at least five years) and will not be divulged to any persons other than those directly involved in the project. Furthermore, data will only be reported in aggregate form and your anonymity is guaranteed."

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"Eating insects could really change the world" my presentation on Jimini's blog.

"Eating insects could really change the world" my presentation on Jimini's blog. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Hello everyone! La version française c'est ici : "Manger des insectes peut réellement changement le monde" Today, it's a special post. Jimini's, a french company specialized in seasoned edible inse...
Ana C. Day's insight:
"Introduction 

After 2 posts of describing the situation about eating insects in Europe, it’s now time to introduce myself… For beginning, I would choose an expression that my friends often use : “Oh Florian, the guy who believes that eating insects will change the world“. 

 So, take a box of “Molitors”, sit comfortably, let’s go! "

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▶ Ep59: Insects, Optimism and Changing the World - Daniel of Tiny Farms - YouTube

Published on Jul 30, 2015

A British import to Silicon Valley and tech star turned bug entrepreneur, Daniel Imrie-Situnayake of Tiny Farms has a lot to offer. 

I hope this episode gets you thinking about the WHY: What problem is your startup going to solve? We had a delightful chat and covered a wide range

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Breeding insects for export, a new industry for VN - News VietNamNet

Breeding insects for export, a new industry for VN - News VietNamNet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
 VietNamNet Bridge - The most difficult procedures in insect export is
asking for the certificate of quality, size and the certificate of
origin for insects.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"After nearly ten years breeding crickets, Mr. Truong Thanh Dung has developed a cricket farm in Duc Lap Thuong commune, Duc Hoa district, Long An province. 

Dung said that his farm supplies the domestic market with 5-6 tons of crickets each month, priced VND100,000/kg (nearly $5). 

“It is not difficult to raise crickets. A basket of crickets yields 50-60 kilos of commercial crickets after 40 days," he said.

According to Dung, both Vietnamese and foreigners like dishes processed from insects. His farm is looking for partners to export frozen crickets to the regional market.

Insects are favored by many countries in the region and the world because insects are rich in protein and minerals beneficial to the human body. 

Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar have developed the insect breeding industry for domestic needs and export. In Vietnam, crickets and other insects like scorpions, centipedes ... are mainly used as feed for birds or fish bait."

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Love Bug: Taste Education and Edible Insects | Business as Unusual

Love Bug: Taste Education and Edible Insects | Business as Unusual | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
After five months of us saying we are going to do a pop-up dinner together, Annie and I finally did it. Our first event was a traditional aphrodisiac and edible insect themed event; a sure fast way to rid ourselves of the pent up frustration over when/where/how/what to do a pop-up on. 
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Crickets the New Chicken? That's Chef Meeru Dhalwala's Mission | The Tyee

Crickets the New Chicken? That's Chef Meeru Dhalwala's Mission | The Tyee | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It's cheap, sustainable protein -- if only Vancouverites would start ordering it.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Tyee: What inspired you to take up cooking with insects?

Dhalwala: "We're just not eating sustainably. I don't think in North America we're giving up eating meat any time soon. But in insects we have an extremely sustainable source of iron and protein. Eighty per cent of the world already enjoys eating it."

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Why do we turn up our noses at eating bugs?

Why do we turn up our noses at eating bugs? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The lines we draw around what's acceptable to put in our mouths have more to do with culture and climate than with science or nutrition.
Ana C. Day's insight:

By Heather Smith "I’d been following the world of insect-eating (entomophagy, to use the precise term) long enough to know that I was looking at a tiny shrink-wrapped miracle.  To get to this point, a lot happen behind the scenes in the American food system. Some people had to set themselves up as growers of insects that met the legal standards of food for humans, not just pet lizards. They had to get approval from the FDA, an agency that thought more about how much insect could accidentally make its way into your food than it did into developing food safety standards for people who wanted to put them there on purpose."

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'Join the insect food revolution' to fight 'global warming': 'I eat bugs...Insects are the future of food and farming'

'Join the insect food revolution' to fight 'global warming': 'I eat bugs...Insects are the future of food and farming' | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Dr. Jenny Josephs, a research psychologist, self described entomophagist and founder of  the 'The Bug Shack' website, spoke at the TEDx Talk conference at the University of Southampton. Josephs pro...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Dr. Jenny Josephs, a research psychologist, self described entomophagist and founder of  the ‘The Bug Shack’ website, spoke at the TEDx Talk conference at the University of Southampton. Josephs promoted eating insects instead of livestock in order to fight climate change. Josephs promotes recipes for cooking bugs. See: RECIPES – INSECT COOKING BASICS

Josephs (Jenny@thebugshack.co.uk) told TEDx Talk that ‘insects are the future of food and farming.’  Josephs notes that ‘gram for gram insects are about 100 times better in terms of greenhouse gas emissions than beef."

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Food: Buggy beverages – Isaan dream, health concern or mixologist magic

Food: Buggy beverages – Isaan dream, health concern or mixologist magic | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

PHUKET: If I found a bamboo grub in my tom yum rum and coke, I would either assume the health office hadn’t been through that particular bar in Phuket in a long time, or my bartender was adding some Isaan flare to an already Thai-style cocktail. 

Ana C. Day's insight:

"“I very much wanted to find an alternative source for acidity in drinks instead of using the classic lemon and lime,” Mr Reynolds explains to the Telegraph. “The formic acid in the ants provided a wonderful sour and bitter orange flavor. As a whole they open consumers’ minds to the fact that we can get very interesting flavors from more than just fruits, herbs and spices.”"

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