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Harvesting Insects Can Help in World Food Crisis | NowPublic Photo Archives

Harvesting Insects Can Help in World Food Crisis | NowPublic Photo Archives | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

It doesn't take long for a food crisis to scar a generation of children with long-lasting brain and physical damage.  It is urgent people get access to essential proteins, and one source that can help in crises, is edible insects. There are many projects around the world working to make insects a palatable and sustainable food source for the future.

Continue reading at NowPublic.com: Harvesting Insects Can Help in World Food Crisis | NowPublic Photo Archives http://www.nowpublic.com/world/harvesting-insects-can-help-world-food-crisis-0#ixzz2HDZANBvv

Ana C. Day's insight:

For many years it was a given that the world's problem was not a lack of food, but that it was unfairly shared. But as the switch to biofuels gathers pace, farmland is being diverted away from growing food for people, to food for fuel.

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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Insects for food and feed - Welcome to the new Global Stakeholder Directory (version 1.0) on Edible Insects

Insects for food and feed - Welcome to the new Global Stakeholder Directory (version 1.0) on Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Welcome to the new Global Stakeholder Directory (version 1.0) on Edible Insects!


This directory lets stakeholders present their current and past work on insects as feed and food. It also enables users to identify synergies on cross cutting topics such as: nutrition, livestock management, legislation, labelling and investment while facilitating networking at regional/national levels.

Stakeholders are invited to join the directory and share contact details, social media channels, and website links which link directly to your publications.

If you would like to be part of this dynamic directory please write to Christopher.Muenke@fao.org. You will then be contacted by FAO in due time with further instructions on how to proceed. Users can choose what information is published online OR if you would like to keep your information private, it will be made available only to the FAO Edible Insect Programme.

The Edible insect programme would like to acknowledge the work done by Ms. Rena Chen, who developed the “International Entomophagist Contact Directory” and whose data was incorporated in this directory. We also acknowledge the work by Wageningen University in incorporating their previous database."

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Marina Mednik-Vaksman's curator insight, May 31, 11:42 AM

Favorite Map of All Time! Excited to explore all the insect stakeholders #aroundtheworld

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Looking back on 2014: How did we do with last year’s predictions?

Looking back on 2014: How did we do with last year’s predictions? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects galore

The idea of eating bugs still may be pretty outlandish for most Europeans, but edible insects have made some significant moves toward the mainstream in 2014.

In particular, Dutch supermarket chain Jumbo announced plans in November to start selling edible insects in the New Year.

And analysts continue to suggest that making insect-containing products that don’t resemble insects – using insect flour, for example – could bring edible insects to many more Europeans in the future.

Meanwhile in the United States, Exo cricket bars have seen a ‘surprising’ level of demand, according to the company’s co-CEO.
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You'll Never Believe This New Fine Dining Trend... - Billionaires Australia

You'll Never Believe This New Fine Dining Trend... - Billionaires Australia | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Food trends don’t come much weirder than the latest big thing featuring on the menus of top restaurants across the world: BUGS!

If you’ve ever been to Thailand you may have come across bugs being served in food markets, everything from scorpions to grasshoppers on sticks. But this tourist attraction in now being taken to fine dining establishments, with bugs being the ingredient of choice.

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Jumpin’ Jiminy: Crickets, for eating, at Earth’s General Store | Edmonton Journal

Jumpin’ Jiminy: Crickets, for eating, at Earth’s General Store | Edmonton Journal | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Michael Kalmanovitch of Earth's General Store has been devoted to vegetarian products in his south side store forever. But now that he's downtown, he's expanded his range of proteins to include organic meat and now, organic crickets.
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▶ Micronutris - La vie rêvée de Gaspard (France 5) - YouTube

Emission du 5 décembre 2014. Micronutris est une entreprise qui produit et commercialise des insectes comestibles nés, élevés en France et nourris à partir d...
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Development and evaluation of novel insect-based milk substitute


Via Jacques Mignon
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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, December 17, 3:48 AM

Part Conclusion :

"In the present study, we describe the novel biotechnological approach based on protein extraction from domestic fly larvae (maggots) resulting in milk substitute (MS) with good organolepric characteristics and well-balanced amount of protein and essential amino acids good nutritional profile with high level of protein and essential amino acids. The principal scheme of process in described, and using the soluble protein fractions obtained by a simple aqueous extraction procedure, is promising in terms of future food or feed applications."

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Bugs for humans…and now, for livestock | Farms.com

Family-run farm to use insect protein to tackle the growing global need for animal feed

By Kyra Lightburn, University of Guelph Agricultural Communications Student, for Farms.com

Bugs for dinner for humans…but not for livestock? That’s the unusual situation Next Millennium Farms finds itself in as it works to legalize the sale of insect protein as a livestock feed in Canada.

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12 Most Bizarre Foods From Around The World

12 Most Bizarre Foods From Around The World | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
As Aussies get ready to stuff their faces with turkey, ham and seafood, our distant neighbours are serving up something a little different this Christmas…
Ana C. Day's insight:
7.

Over 1000 species of insects - beetles, bees, ants, hoppy things - are eaten in 80% of the world's nations, covering Latin America, Asia, Oceania and Africa.

In Kenya and Tanzania, fried grasshoppers are the go-to insect.

In Mexico, chapulines (grasshoppers) are served with garlic, lime juice and salt containing extract of agave worms for a sour-spicy-salty double dose of bug.  

New Zealanders swear huhu grub (beetle larvae) tastes like peanut butter. And in our very own country, the similar looking witchetty grub is said to be like almonds when raw, and roast chicken with egg inside when cooked.

Leafcutter ants are eaten in Colombia and Brazil, and coconut grubs in Ecuador.

Native Americans once roasted beetles as an alternative to popcorn.

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Review of food composition data for edible insects

Review of food composition data for edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract

Edible insects are considered rich in protein and a variety of micronutrients, and are therefore seen as potential contributors to food security. However, the estimation of the insects’ contribution to the nutrient intake is limited since data are absent in food composition tables and databases. Therefore, FAO/INFOODS collected and published analytical data from primary sources with sufficient quality in the Food Composition Database for Biodiversity (BioFoodComp). Data were compiled for 456 food entries on insects in different developmental stages. A total of 5734 data points were entered, most on minerals and trace elements (34.8%), proximates (24.5%), amino acids (15.3%) and (pro)vitamins (9.1%). Data analysis of Tenebrio molitor confirms its nutritive quality that can help to combat malnutrition. The collection of data will assist compilers to incorporate more insects into tables and databases, and to further improve nutrient intake estimations.

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Bridge2Food - 5th Healthy Bars & Grain Snacks 2015

Bridge2Food - 5th Healthy Bars & Grain Snacks 2015 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bridge2Food - 5th Healthy Bars & Grain Snacks 2015. Online registration by Cvent
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Entoview with Tiny Farms | Edible Bug Farm

Entoview with Tiny Farms | Edible Bug Farm | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Tiny Farms co-founder, Daniel Imrie-Situnayake, provides some thoughts on the growing entomophagy industry and their place in it.

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Food Trends for 2015 - insects and algae set to compete with traditional protein | Access 6

Food Trends for 2015 - insects and algae set to compete with traditional protein | Access 6 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
If 2014 was the year of 'free-from' foods, 2015 will see some different trends emerging according to Innova Market Insights. 

Labelling

With the new  EU legislation on Food Information to Consumers (FIC) coming into effect on 13 December 2014, the number one trend is expected to be 'from clean to clear' label. It is predicted that there will be a focus on origin and naturalness with simpler claims and more striaght-forward packaging for maximum transparency.

Convenience
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A Life in the Day: Dr Sarah Beynon, pioneering bug-eater | The Sunday Times

A Life in the Day: Dr Sarah Beynon, pioneering bug-eater | The Sunday Times | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Dr Sarah Beynon, 30, who runs a bug farm in Wales, talks about breeding insects for human consumption
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What to Eat After the Apocalypse - Issue 101: In Our Nature - Nautilus

What to Eat After the Apocalypse - Issue 101: In Our Nature - Nautilus | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The other obvious one is insects. The conversion ratios between biomass and food in insects is much better than say, in cows. Beef production is unbelievably inefficient the way that we do it. In the west, we definitely turn our noses up at eating insects. But there are actually quite a few people throughout the world that eat insects today and, for feeding everyone, it is a very obvious solution. It’s not like you have to eat insects raw. You would never know the difference between say, a sausage patty, a veggie sausage patty, and an insect sausage patty. It’s all the same! It’s just the spices. Let the food scientists go crazy on it.
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Food Design Friday: Higher Learning, Insect Farming and Bio-Packaging

Food Design Friday: Higher Learning, Insect Farming and Bio-Packaging | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Training Insect Farmers in Kinshasa
With 96 tonnes of caterpillars supplied to the capital city for the Democratic Republic of Congo annually, it makes sense to launch a training program to promote insect farming in Kinshasa. A new program promises to train 1000 people in the next year to farm and process insects for human consumption.
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Thought For Food Challenge  - Insect "meat product" in the Top 10

Thought For Food Challenge  - Insect "meat product" in the Top 10 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Thought For Food is a movement dedicated to developing solutions to the challenge of feeding the world's growing population.  Every year they run a competition where teams from all around the world...
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The 5 Foods That Will Rule 2015

The 5 Foods That Will Rule 2015 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Americans are clamoring for protein more than ever. With the rising popularity of the Paleo diet and the growing contempt for carbohydrates, novel protein products are becoming more readily available. High-protein snacks like Greek yogurt have benefited greatly from Americans' hunger for protein. Insect-based protein products might sound bizarre, but they're poised to explode in popularity for a variety of reasons.

FROM AROUND THE WEB

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One, they can pack a significant amount of protein and other nutrients into a small package. Two, they're more eco-friendly than traditional protein sources such as cattle. Three, they actually taste pretty good. For example, STACK reviewed two cricket-based protein bars earlier this year, and we were pleasantly surprised at their flavor. Insects (such as crickets) can easily be ground into a flour, which makes their culinary uses virtually endless. Look for more people to be getting a protein punch from bugs in the year ahead.
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El futuro de comer sano pasa por los insectos y los 'superalimentos'

El futuro de comer sano pasa por los insectos y los 'superalimentos' | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Alternativas proteicas. Los insectos están en la diana por su «alto contenido en nutrientes». «Son una excelente fuente proteica», indican desde Hi Europe. De hecho, añaden, ya forman parte de la dieta diaria de casi 2.000 millones de personas en todo el mundo. Ante las previsiones del aumento de la población mundial -que podría alcanzar los 9.000 millones en 2050 - se hace «indispensable» desarrollar nuevas fuentes de proteínas. Actualmente existen más de 1.000 especies de insectos comestibles, entre los que se incluyen el ditisco o escarabajo acuático, las avispas y las larvas. También son una opción sostenible. Ana Christina Day, directora general de la empresa 4ento, explica: «Para producir un kilo de grillos sólo se necesita un litro de agua, frente a los 22.000 litros de agua que se precisan para producir un kilo de carne de vacuno».
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Are You Ready for Mealworm Quiche?

Are You Ready for Mealworm Quiche? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

EFFORTS ARE UNDERWAY in the Netherlands to sell the public on an insect diet as a remedy for anticipated food shortages. A supermarket chain has begun selling edible insects, and a Wageningen University professor is working with local chefs to produce an insect cookbook.

Jumbo stores in Groningen and Haren are offering a burger of mealworms and a crispy snack from the larvae of the honeycomb moth. Some 400 other stores of the chain will follow suit soon. “The new products mean Jumbo is offering its clients a healthy and sustainable alternative to fish or meat,” the company said in a statement. Many believe that such an alternative must come.

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Top food trends for 2015: the full list

Top food trends for 2015: the full list | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insect proteins and fruit-sweetened confectionery are two emerging trends food manufacturers should monitor, according to a list of top 10 food trends for 2015, revealed at the Health Ingredients Europe (HiE) event.
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Need inspiration for your seasonal sustainability lesson? Try Mince Flies - Education - TES News

Need inspiration for your seasonal sustainability lesson? Try Mince Flies - Education - TES News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Breaking education news about schools and further education. Find leading opinion, podcasts, comment and analysis on education from TES News
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Food: les 10 meilleurs cadeaux pour Noël

Food:  les 10 meilleurs cadeaux pour Noël | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
À mettre sous le sapin pour Noël ou à consommer entre la poire et le fromage le soir du réveillon, voici la liste des objets les plus... Read more »
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This fancy restaurant has insects in almost every menu item

This fancy restaurant has insects in almost every menu item | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Black Ant, in Manhattan's East Village, is serving upscale Mexican-inspired cuisine that folds in a variety of insects, including ants, grasshoppers and scorpions.
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Bélgica autoriza el consumo de insectos como alimentos

Bélgica autoriza el consumo de insectos como alimentos | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
La Agencia Federal para la Seguridad Alimentaria belga publica una lista de diez especies que podrán comercializarse en ese país. - ANTENA 3 TV
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Insects: the future of Christmas dinners? | Global Food Security blog

Insects: the future of Christmas dinners? | Global Food Security blog | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Insects are hailed as a cheap, sustainable source of protein and other micronutrients which have minimal greenhouse gas emissions and can be fed on waste.

They are much better at converting their food into protein and body mass – feed conversion (PDF) – than poultry and other livestock, meaning that they could be a much more efficient source of protein for animal and human consumption.

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Eating Insects - Sustainable Food - Curious Meerkat

Eating Insects - Sustainable Food - Curious Meerkat | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects provide a versatile, healthy meat substitute with fewer greenhouse gases. Is eating insects disgusting, or an ingenious sustainable food source?
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