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Adventures in Food Their ideas may seem radical, but these food revolutionaries aim to change how the world eats.

Adventures in Food Their ideas may seem radical, but these food revolutionaries aim to change how the world eats. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
One of the main themes of the 2010 TEDGlobal conference in Oxford was food—where it comes from, how we buy it, and what it does for our brains. The subject couldn’t be more timely, though being optimistic about food news takes some patient searching.
Ana C. Day's insight:

World population is set to grow to 9 billion by 2050, and the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that to feed this number, we’ll need to increase agricultural production by 70 percent.

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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Europe Agrees to Allow Insects as Food - #4ento

Europe Agrees to Allow Insects as Food - #4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Europe has finally reached an agreement on the new Novel Food laws and how it affects insects as food. Find out the details.
Ana C. Day's insight:
Switzerland Plans To Allow Insects As Food

In February 2015, Switzerland was planning to approve some of the same insects as Belgium has been allowing.

Here are some interesting excerpts from this Swissinfo article:

“According to Evelyn Kirchsteiger-Meier, head of the department of quality management and food law at the Zurich University of Applied Sciences, the food safety office is looking, among other things, at a risk analysis by the Belgian authorities. “

“The food safety office notes in its explanation on the new regulation that insects must be frozen and heated before delivery because they are potential carriers of parasites and disease-causing microbes.”

“In addition, they must be recognizable as insects, so not processed. “This is to protect consumers from fraud, because the consumer expectations in our culture are that insects are viewed as pests.””

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Innovative formulation -Science meets nature !

Innovative formulation -Science meets nature ! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Science meets nature

Our innovative formulation draws its inspiration from 20 years of research and food product development. Detailed biochemistry and exhaustive food science trials have done the hard work of nutritional science for you.

Respect your body. Try Smash Nutrition high protein recovery powder and start smashing your goals today.

Our formulation contains natural sources of
proteases (which help digest proteins) from fruit, and all the essential amino acids. Get to grips with our myriad of wonder ingredients below.
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Unspoken Words: Interview with Laura D'Asaro co-founder of Six Foods

Published on Feb 4, 2016
Today on Unspoken Words, Robert Dunn chats with Laura D'Asaro! Laura D’Asaro and Rose Wang, who founded Six Foods, plan to get around the yuck factor with insect-based foods that don’t look like the creepy-crawlies they come from. Their cricket flour is about 70 per cent protein by weight – the idea is to blend it into recipes for chips and cookies alongside the other typical ingredients. The foods come out looking and tasting like things people are already used to eating, only with a boost in nutritional value.
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Insectos consumidos actualmente: Los Chinches

Insectos consumidos actualmente: Los Chinches | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
En México (Ramos Elorduy y Pino, 2003), el sur de África y el sudeste Asia, no es raro encontrar personas que consuman chinches (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), tanto ninfas, como adultos (DeFoliart, 2002). En el África meridional, Encosternum delegorguei se consideran un manajar. Los chinches se consumen en Malawi, Sudáfrica y Zimbabwe (Faure, 1944; Van Huis, 2003;…
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The Future of Protein | The Field Guides

The Future of Protein | The Field Guides | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Writer Allison Fogarty unpacks our appetite for meat and asks whether Australians are ready to embrace edible insects as a new source of protein
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Australia is a meat-obsessed nation. Ranked in the top 3 biggest meat eating countries in the world, the average Australian will consume 111.5 kilograms of meat every year. It’s part of our cultural identity to char sausages on a BBQ, but the carnivorous golden age is coming to an end. Researchers are now predicting that traditional livestock production won’t be sufficient to meet demand by 2050. As the global population swells to 9 billion, there simply won’t be enough land and water to produce such huge volumes of meat. Whether we like it or not, altering our appetite for the flesh is inevitable.

One solution to this emerging problem is to embrace alternative sources of protein, and entomophagy (insect eating) is leading the pack. Farmed insects have an astonishingly low ecological footprint because they use just a fraction of the water, land and feed required to...."

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Chirpy Breakfast Bagel with Cherry Almond Butter

Chirpy Breakfast Bagel with Cherry Almond Butter | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It's been a while since my last post; I've been pretty busy with musical side projects, but apparently not so busy that I couldn't post a quick brunch recipe. At any rate....a couple of weeks ago, I tried something new with some circular bread dipping dishes that my best friend's parents gave me.  Let me tell you, these…
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Insectos consumidos en la actualidad: La Termita

Insectos consumidos en la actualidad: La Termita | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
En el mundo occidental, generalmente las termitas son sinónimo de plagas y son conocidas por su capacidad para devorar la madera. Sin embargo, las termitas se consideran un manjar en muchas partes del mundo. Se consumen en muchos tipos de platos, o simplemente como aperitivo después de haber sido fritas y secadas al sol (Kinyuru,…
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Las termitas son ricas en proteínas, ácidos grasos y otros micronutrientes. Cuando se preparan fritas o desecadas pueden contener entre un 32 % y un 38% de proteínas (Tihon, 1946; Santos Oliveira et al, 1976;. Nkouka, 1987). La concentración de ácidos grasos esenciales como el ácido linoleico es particularmente alta entre las especies de termitas Africanas, Macrotermes bellicosus (34 %) y M. Subhyalinus (43 %) (Santos Oliveira et al., 1976). En la República Bolivariana de Venezuela, las especies ...."

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Looking Ahead: Food Trends of 2016

Looking Ahead: Food Trends of 2016 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible Insects
The Scoop: Lauded for providing more health and environmental benefits than meat and fish, insects offer a sustainable and stable source of nutrients. There’s a wide range available; there are almost a million species of insects, although not all are edible. They’re not so taboo abroad so while there are plenty of new products out there to try (cricket is big, think Exo or Bitty), this trend will gain staying power if people get educated and perceptions shift.

Find It: When you're ready, look around EntoMarket. It's an online marketplace for a wide variety of edible insect products. First, you might want to browse Little Herds, a non-profit educating and changing people's perception about eating bugs, or Girl Meets Bug, a blog with the same purpose.
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Bay Area firms look forward with insect-based foods

Bay Area firms look forward with insect-based foods | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Forget extreme eaters, fear factor contestants and adventurous world travelers. Bugs — crickets, specifically — are going mainstream as a protein source, and several Bay Area companies, from food purveyors to insect farms, are pioneering the movement. “The facts tell the truth about what’s happening to our food system and environment,” says local chef and food personality Tyler Florence, who partnered with Bitty Foods as its culinary director after his business partner Adam Block saw Miller’s TEDx talk. Florence recently promoted snacks made with Bitty flour at San Francisco’s Fancy Food Show, an industry trade show where crickets were listed as a top trend. [...] with the rising tide of gluten-free foods, it certainly helps that cricket flour is a viable alternative to regular flour.

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Startup of the Year Leser Award 2015-2016

Startup of the Year Leser Award 2015-2016 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
  Jede Stimme zählt Wir suchen das STARTUP OF THE YEAR 2015/2016 Stimme jetzt für das Startup ab, das deiner
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  • Greenpicks (21%, 61 Votes)
  • Geschenkedienst24 (19%, 53 Votes)
  • Amparra (16%, 46 Votes)
  • Bugfoundation (13%, 36 Votes)
  • Projectroom (11%, 30 Votes)
  • CODE2ORDER (4%, 12 Votes)
  • Kitchennerds (4%, 12 Votes)
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Attend an open workshop on novel foods: 4 February 2016 | Food Standards Agency

Attend an open workshop on novel foods: 4 February 2016 | Food Standards Agency | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
You are invited to attend a novel foods workshop and discuss the food medicine continuum, alternative protein sources and engineered nanotechnology. Our independent committee, the Advisory Committee on Novel Foods and Processes (ACNFP), is holding the workshop in London on Thursday 4 February 2016. Everyone is welcome to attend. The closing date for applying to attend is Thursday 14 January.
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Edible insects and minilivestock: the food of the future - Interview with Prof. M. Paoletti

Edible insects and minilivestock: the food of the future - Interview with Prof. M. Paoletti | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects and minilivestock: the food of the future
Ana C. Day's insight:
"An interview with Prof. Maurizio Guido Paoletti, Professor at the Department of Biology at the University of Padua, entomophagy expert and author of “Ecological implication of Minilivestock”, a book that analyzes the use of small animals as nutritious food."
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Eating Crickets: Why One Vogue Editor Did It, and Why You Should, Too

Eating Crickets: Why One Vogue Editor Did It, and Why You Should, Too | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Crickets may be the future of protein . . . if you can stomach eating bugs. One editor gives it a try.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Next time there is a lull at the dinner table, try my favorite conversation starter: “What is the weirdest thing you’ve ever eaten?” Trust me, avid traveler or not, everyone keeps a mental list. Here’s mine: yak meat in Tibet, donkey meat, tripe, and the occasional pig ear and frog leg through various parts of Europe and Asia. If you think that’s fairly tame, there’s also the clay pot of live crustaceans soaked in 100-proof white-liquor broth I ate in a seaside town near Shanghai. I was told to slurp the creatures down whole as soon as they passed out from the alcohol. And after my recent trip to Oaxaca over the holidays, I can now proudly add crickets to this list."

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To Eat Or Not To Eat Insects…

To Eat Or Not To Eat Insects… | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Entomophagy, the act of humans consuming insects. Although the norm for many cultures (around 80% of the world's population) across South America, Asia and Africa, most Brits' exposure and knowledge of eating creepy crawlies starts and finishes with having watched celebs eat them as a challenge on I'm a Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here. And for them, the idea of it isn't an appealing one.

However, with the detrimental environmental effects (air and water pollution, deforestation and overfishing) of farming such vast quantities of livestock 'needed' to fulfil the growing demands for meat and fish, then eating insects might be the answer. It is a cost-effective and eco-friendly process and they're packed with protein, minerals, vitamins, fibre and healthy fats.
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Would you consume 'cricket flour' after a workout?

Would you consume 'cricket flour' after a workout? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Smash Nutrition, based in Hanwell, Ealing, has launched a unique Cricket Protein Formula to counter the rising number of athletes suffering from intolerance to whey
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Smash Nutrition's Cricket Protein Formula is designed to be taken directly after a workout and is quickly digested for prolonged recovery and to restore glycogen levels more efficiently.

The formula doesn't consist purely of cricket, but uses a range of natural protein sources as well as providing all the required amino acids and natural protease enzymes.

It uses Acheta Domestica crickets which are commercially raised in controlled, hygienic conditions before being transformed into high quality cricket flour protein."

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Selected species of edible insects as a source of nutrient composition

Selected species of edible insects as a source of nutrient composition | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Official Full-Text Publication: Selected species of edible insects as a source of nutrient composition on ResearchGate, the professional network for scientists.
Ana C. Day's insight:

ABSTRACT

"The aim of this study was to determine the nutritive value of edible insects and their in vitro cytotoxicity assays. The content of protein, fat, carbohydrates, ash, fiber, minerals, amino acids, and fatty acids in adult cricket (Gryllodes sigillatus), larvae of mealworm (Tenebrio molitor), and adult locust (Schistocerca gregaria) were analyzed. The protein content ranged from 52.35 to 76%. The fat percentage was in the range of 12.97–24.7%. Energy contribution varied from 1821 to 1896 kJ/100 g. Their amino acid profile was compared with the WHO/FAO/UNU Pattern (WHO, 2007). The highest degree of hydrolysis (DH) was noted in baked Gryllodes sigillatus (37.76%). All species were very rich in magnesium, copper, iron, and zinc and the mineral content was compared to recommended daily intakes (mg/day). The hydrolysates from raw, cooked, and baked insects were significantly stimulated or inhibited proliferation of human skin fibroblasts CRL-2522.


Selected species of edible insects as a source of nutrient composition (PDF Download Available). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/282860539_Selected_species_of_edible_insects_as_a_source_of_nutrient_composition [accessed Feb 5, 2016]."

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Practical key to identify entire edible insects sold as foodstuff or feedstuff in central Europe - Open Access - Vetline

Practical key to identify entire edible insects sold as foodstuff or feedstuff in central Europe - Open Access - Vetline | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In 2014, edible insects have been introduced officially into the European Union market in Belgium and the Netherlands as foodstuffs, presenting national regulations in order to nsure food safety. Entomophagy is also practiced, on a small scale, in other EU countries, e. g. Germany. Consumers and public health staff are interested in knowing more about this foodstuff, and identification of edible insects is one of the information fields that have to be attended..
Ana C. Day's insight:

..........Insects are usually identified using scientific keys, but the specialized nomenclature to describe exterior features makes this a job for experts. The present key is intended to be used also by non-experts, addressing 18 insects species that are either part of the official Belgian and/or Dutch list for insects that are tradable as foodstuffs or are available in German pet shops from where consumers may buy them, rededicating a feedstuff knowingly and at their own risk to a foodstuff. As a preliminary evaluation, the key was offered students of veterinary medicine. They were asked to identify some insect with this key and to rate it with a score from 1 (very easy) to 6 (impossible). Students worked with n = 20 insect specimens rating the key with mean score of 1.85 ± 0.72. The key presented here includes the improvements as suggested by the students."

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Eartheasy Blog » Should We Be Eating Insects?

Eartheasy Blog » Should We Be Eating Insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Sometimes solutions to the world’s toughest problems are right under our noses—or that’s what innovators from Europe and North America seem to be discovering in their hunt for global food security. In recent years, impending protein shortages and the lack of sustainable food production models have led more than one innovator to the practice of entomophagy, otherwise known as eating insects. Could they be onto something?
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The potential of a diet full of bugs

The potential of a diet full of bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Most people would cringe at the thought of eating bugs for dinner, but David George Gordon does it...

Ana C. Day's insight:

"An award-winning author, naturalist and speaker, Gordon is a proponent of entomophagy –– “the fancy word for bug eating” as he puts it –– since the release of his Eat-a-Bug Cookbook in 1998, and he has seen the cultural shift that has started to take place in regards to consuming insects. 

A good source of protein, in the face of an ever threatened food system, many have advocated for insects as part of a more sustainable diet. 

Raising cattle is not a very sustainable thing,” said Gordon. 

He said to produce one hamburger, for example, it takes around 460 gallons of water, not to mention the amount of land required to raise cattle. Today livestock production accounts for 70 percent of all agricultural land use. Given that global demand for livestock is estimated to more than double by 2050."

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How to Raise Your Own Crickets

How to Raise Your Own Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
How to Raise Your Own Crickets. Are you tired of going to the pet store and buying crickets every week to feed your scaly, squirmy, or hairy little friend? If you're a true do-it-yourselfer, then you might be interested in raising your own...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Are you tired of going to the pet store and buying crickets every week to feed your scaly, squirmy, or hairy little friend? If you're a true do-it-yourselfer, then you might be interested in raising your own colony of crickets, which will provide a steady — and free — source of crickets right within the comfort of your home."

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Entomophagy: Can you swallow this food trend? - Canadian Running Magazine

Entomophagy: Can you swallow this food trend? - Canadian Running Magazine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eating insects isn't new. Including bugs are a main food ingredient (the technical term is entomophagy) is however becoming more trendy.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"World renowned chefs are jumping onto the bug-bandwagon as well. Just this past spring, Time Magazine asked 20 famous chefs to offer up an insect recipe of their own, proving that the most elite foodies aren’t turning up their noses at the prospect of a new protein source on the menu.

Apart from the whole being good for the social and physical planet thing, perhaps the most compelling reason to dip your taste buds into the trend is because… bugs are really good for you. A serving of grasshoppers packs the same protein punch as a serving of ground beef, but with significantly less fat."

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Réseau ELEVAGE's curator insight, February 3, 2:48 AM

Recettes de chefs, d'autres protéines animales dans nos assiettes

 

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Competitive Intelligence in the Entomology Industry

Competitive Intelligence in the Entomology Industry | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Here is a text a I wrote some time ago for project and I thought this would be of interest for a wider audience as well. It is about competitive intelligence especially in the entomology industry. What are the aspects you should look into and how to collect the relevant information? Take a look! How…
Ana C. Day's insight:

"How to collect Competitive Intelligence in IFF-industry?

As mentioned earlier the industry is still in its infancy meaning that there are only a limited amount of operators in the field. As the number is limited keeping an eye on the identified competitors through news, social media and their homepages is not too big of a task. Though, the situation will change eventually.

Before the industry grows further networking is possibly the best way of gathering Competitive Intelligence. The circles are small so even if you would be missing a contract to a certain company, it is possible to reach a company that knows them well."

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Trademark, startuppers! - Bugsolutely

Trademark, startuppers! - Bugsolutely | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
There are probably more than 200 start ups (we counted 100, but that is only our brief research…) in the edible insect market. Most are quite small and do their best with the resources they have, facing a new market and a legislative grey area that add risks on top of more risks. Well, Bugsolutely is no different at all.

Still, we decided to spend some money on protecting our brand (Bugsolutely) and especially our product name (Cricket Pasta) by registering the trademark in some countries. Our experience may be helpful for others, and what follows is a quick summary of what we have done
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Recipe: Cricket Flour Banana Bread

Recipe: Cricket Flour Banana Bread | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Made with Bitty Foods baking flour (a blend of cassava flour, cricket flour, coconut flour and tapioca starch), this gluten-free, dense banana bread has a nutty, spicy flavor. ½ teaspoon baking soda ¼ cup walnuts, toasted and chopped (optional) or substitute chocolate chips Preheat the oven to 330 degrees and line a 5-by-9-inch loaf pan with parchment paper.
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Bug Farm is a dream come true for Dr Beynon

Bug Farm is a dream come true for Dr Beynon | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A COMBINED visitor attraction, research and education centre in St Davids has been shortlisted for a national business award.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The Bug Farm is the vision of Dr Sarah Beynon, who wanted to combine her love of farming, academic research and education by setting up a centre of excellence in her hometown of St Davids.

“The Bug Farm is my dream come true,” she said.

“I get to run innovative research projects, take children on magical tours into a hidden world in our tropical bug zoo and, best of all, live in Pembrokeshire.

“As an added bonus, I get to do all of this on my original family farm, which I bought back in December 2013 when it was a derelict shell of its former glory."

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We Have Italian, Blue Cheese, Ranch … Roach? Insect Oil's Rich in Omega-3 Acids!

We Have Italian, Blue Cheese, Ranch … Roach? Insect Oil's Rich in Omega-3 Acids! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Oil produced from insects isn't too different from canola oil. Learn more in this HowStuffWorks Now article.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"What's a scientist to do when she discovers insect oil is going to waste after a colleague has finished researching its proteins? Well, if your field is the study of milk fats, you just branch out a little. It's not that big a stretch from milk fat to insect fat, right? 


Though her primary research is with milk fats, Daylan Tzompa-Sosa, a post-doc food scientist at the Wageningen University and Research Centre in the Netherlands, saw opportunity when she realized insect fats were just going to waste. She discovered an oil rich in Omega-3 fatty acids that can be sustainably produced, and may change the way people around the world — or at least in most Western countries — eat everything from salad dressing to French fries."

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