Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Mealworms: They're not just for breakfast anymore...

Mealworms: They're not just for breakfast anymore... | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The wriggly beetle larvae known as mealworms could one day dominate supermarket shelves as a more sustainable alternative to chicken, beef, pork and milk, researchers in the Netherlands say.
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction

#BugsEndHunger - Eat bugs, fight for #foodsecurity. Share, donate, eat & empower! @LittleHerds #SeedsOfAction | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What happens when you eat bugs for 30 days? We believe it will help fuel a movement to end global malnutrition. Little Herds is proud to partner with Seeds Of Action for the #BugsEndHunger campaign. On May 1st, Seeds Of Action co-founder Jeremy Connor will begin his 30 day diet of eating bugs and plant based foods that can be found, or brought in through food aid programs, in areas where the 1 billion chronically hungry are struggling to live. This campaign will bring awareness to edible insects as a sustainable solution to food insecurity and produce a freely distributed, visually based, Farming Insects Guide (FIG) to empower communities across the planet to begin farming insects for food and economic security.
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Life cycle assessment of cricket farming in north-eastern Thailand

Life cycle assessment of cricket farming in north-eastern Thailand | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract
Over the last few years, edible insect species have been heralded as an environmentally sustainable solution to current and future food crises. However, the few existing studies that aim to evaluate the environmental performance of insect farming systems are extremely limited in scope. This paper presents the first case of a life cycle assessment (LCA) performed on an existing production system of Gryllus bimaculatus De Geer (field cricket) and Acheta domesticus (house cricket) production in north-eastern Thailand and compares it with broiler production in the same region. The system boundaries of the production system considered the entire production cycle of edible crickets as well as processing. The study included two functional units (1 kg of edible mass and 1 kg of protein in edible mass). Irrespective of the functional unit, larger impacts were associated with broiler production. Major hotspots for cricket and broiler production were related to the production soybean meal and maize grain for feed. A scaled-up cricket farming system which was considered as a possible 'future' scenario demonstrated a reduction in overall environmental impacts when compared to current cricket production and industrial broiler production. While scaled-up cricket farming showed fewer overall environmental impacts, intensified systems could potentially have reduced socioeconomic impacts on rural areas in Thailand. Improvement options could be adopted by undertaking further research into the formulation of local feeds and acquiring improved knowledge about cricket nutrition.
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The Best Wine and Bug Pairings, According to an Expert

The Best Wine and Bug Pairings, According to an Expert | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

For Aly Moore, grasshoppers were the gateway bug.

Moore tried tacos de chapulines, or grasshopper tacos, during a summer building health clinics in Mexico, and that first taste opened the door to what would become her calling. Five years later, the Los Angeles resident and founder of Eat Bugs Events has made it her mission to educate people on the merits of eating bugs, offering (somewhat) approachable events like gourmet wine and bug tastings.

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Edible insects give Mexicans a taste of history – and maybe the future

Edible insects give Mexicans a taste of history – and maybe the future | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
APRIL 25, 2017 MEXICO CITY—At first glance, the stalls set up in this neighborhood garden look like they could be part of any typical farmer’s market. There are the men selling artisanal chocolates, the bread maker stacking her loaves precariously high, and the couple slinging tortillas over a smoking comal, or griddle.

But upon closer inspection, there’s something buggy about this scene. Literally.

A glistening cockroach is perched upon that square of chocolate. There are crispy brown grasshoppers cooked into that bread. And the tortillas? Smeared with fly eggs and garnished with a spicy green salsa.

This is the third annual Festival of Edible Insects, and the crowded passageways between the horseshoe of stalls is a testament to the growing resurgence in popularity of this centuries-old Mexican culinary tradition, amid a broader uptick of interest in Mexico's heritage that goes beyond its borders.
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The burger of the future comes from crickets, not cows

The burger of the future comes from crickets, not cows | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Agriculture has come a long way in the past century. We produce more food than ever before — but our current model is unsustainable, and as the world’s population rapidly approaches the 8 billion mark, modern food production methods will need a radical transformation if they’re going to keep up. But luckily, there’s a range of new technologies that might make it possible. In this series, we’ll explore some of the innovative new solutions that farmers, scientists, and entrepreneurs are working on to make sure that nobody goes hungry in our increasingly crowded world.

Across the world, it’s not uncommon for human beings to practice entomophagy — the consumption of insects — without a second thought. In fact, insects are often considered a delicacy in certain cultures. From the chapulines (toasted grasshoppers) of Mexico to the fried tarantulas of Cambodia, bugs regularly find their way into our bellies — without the accompaniment of braggadocious Instagram posts – “#OMG# I can’t believe I’m eating this!”

In much of Europe and North America, though, we don’t like to eat things with more than four legs. Insects are considered to be gross — not just because they live between bedsprings and below floorboards, but because of their crunchy texture and their villainous perception. Ask the next person you speak to their opinion on eating bugs, and you’re likely to receive an expression that’s a combination of disgust and incredulity.
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Bangkok's getting a new restaurant dedicated to edible insects

Bangkok's getting a new restaurant dedicated to edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bangkok will soon welcome a new restaurant dedicated to edible insects—a trend that's been creeping onto menus globally of late. 

Called Insects in the Backyard, the restaurant in Thonburi’s soon-to-open art complex, Chang Chui, has been conceptualized by the team behind the Old Town's beloved Seven Spoons. So, rest assured the food will be a little different to the fried insects we’re familiar with on the street. 

Chef Thitiwat Tantragarn will head the modern international kitchen to serve the likes of cricket pasta with pesto and chorizo, red ant and peppercorn-marinated tomahawk steak and Marou chocolate-covered crickets.

Set to open in May, this restaurant is one of the first in Bangkok to highlight bugs on the menu, following the current global trend for insect cuisine popularized by the Noma-sponsored Nordic Food Lab (creators of the recently-premiered Bugs documentary and On Eating Insects book).

High in protein, with a far lighter carbon footprint than meat or dairy farming, insects are already a staple diet for a substantial proportion of the global population. Now we're seeing more and more chefs looking to challenge the inhibitions of diners usually accustomed to viewing bugs as pests rather than food. 

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Chefs and researchers incorporate insects, protein powerhouses into mainstream diet

Chefs and researchers incorporate insects, protein powerhouses into mainstream diet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A bug protein shake, anyone? If all goes well, Arun Hazarika of Cotton University, Guwahati, would have one ready for you by the end of the year. A professor in the department of zoology, Hazarika has been working on 16 edible bugs, commonly consumed in the Baksa district of Assam. "I am trying to work on ways to extract the protein and mineral content of insects to create organic food products," he says.

In Baksa, it is common to find termites, mole crickets, water scavengers, eri pupae, water beetles and junebugs in the kitchen, with the tribes transforming these into stirfries, roasts and chutneys.

Taking a cue from their food habits, Hazarika and his team member, Jayanta Kumar Das of Barama College, began finding out more about the nutritional benefits of these insects, and ways in which they could be incorporated in mainstream diets. "In the course of the research, we found that these bugs have minerals such as cadmium, zinc, magnesium, iron and copper. So why not harness that into supplements and powders to be consumed regularly?" asks Hazarika.
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ASME ISHOW - Hardware Led Social Innovation

ASME ISHOW - Hardware Led Social Innovation | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The ASME Innovation showcase (ISHOW) is a global competition for hardware led ventures. We focus on the design & engineering journey of taking physical products to market. We care about “social innovation”, that is, solving social and environmental issues through enterprize. We believe a focus on users and customers ensures sustainable and scalable solutions. We are a global network of engineers, makers, dreamers, designers, investors and entrepreneurs.

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Edible insects

Edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

With a twist of lime and a dash of salt Sydney chef Nowshad Alam Rasel flavours a hot pan full of crickets, tossing them over a flaming stove. Videographic about edible insects.VIDEOGRAPHIC

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Roasted cockroach for dinner? Insects creep onto menus of Australian eateries | The National

Roasted cockroach for dinner? Insects creep onto menus of Australian eateries  | The National | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
SYDNEY // With a twist of lime and a dash of salt Sydney chef Nowshad Alam Rasel flavours a hot pan full of crickets, tossing them over a flaming stove.

The savoury snack, which would not be out of place at a Mexican cantina or a Bangkok street stall, is creeping onto menus at Australian boutique eateries such as El Topo, challenging the inhibitions of diners.

"When they come for the first time, the customer very much wants to know what it is," says sous-chef Mr Rasel, as he neatly plates up the fried critters, topped with slices of fresh chilli.


Roasted cockroach, honey-flavoured ants, and mealworm and chocolate coated popcorn are now available to try and buy – and while the cuisine remains a novelty, there are signs it is growing in popularity.

Consumer attitude toward eating insects is usually split explains Skye Blackburn, owner of Australia’s largest insect supplier, the Edible Bug Shop in Sydney.

"The first kind of people are completely grossed out and they really can’t change their mind and they kind of just want to come and have a look and don’t want to try it really," says the insect expert.


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Bugs for dinner? New Aussie food trend has legs (and wings)

Bugs for dinner? New Aussie food trend has legs (and wings) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
SYDNEY: With a twist of lime and a dash of salt, Sydney chef Nowshad Alam Rasel flavours a hot pan full of crickets, tossing them over a flaming stove.

The savoury snack, which would not be out of place at a Mexican cantina or a Bangkok street stall, is creeping onto menus at Australian boutique eateries such as El Topo, challenging the inhibitions of diners.

"When they come for the first time, the customer very much wants to know what it is," says sous-chef Rasel, as he neatly plates up the fried critters, topped with slices of fresh chilli.

Roasted cockroach, honey-flavoured ants, mealworm, and chocolate-coated popcorn are now available to try and buy – and while the cuisine remains a novelty, there are signs it is growing in popularity.

Consumer attitude toward eating insects are usually split explains Skye Blackburn, owner of Australia's largest insect supplier, the Edible Bug Shop in Sydney.

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Entomophagy: Insects as Food | InTechOpen

Entomophagy: Insects as Food | InTechOpen | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
1. Introduction

Entomophagy, the consumption of insects, is rooted in human evolutionary history [1]. Insects have played an important part in the history of human nutrition in Africa, Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Over 1900 species of insects are known worldwide to be part of human diets; some important groups include grasshoppers, caterpillars, beetle grubs, wringed termites, bees, worms, ant brood, cicadas, and a variety of aquatic insects [2]. It is interesting to know that more than two billion people consume insects on a regular basis, and insect eating provides a significant proportion of the animal proteins consumed in some regions [3]. Because entomophagy is widely practiced, and because it compares favorably with nutrient and environmental aspects of conventional livestock rearing, it has the potential to contribute substantially to reducing undernutrition among an expanding global population [3].

2. Diversity of edible insect species in the world

Insects have been in existence for at least 400 million years, making them among the earliest land animals. They diverged as members of one of the largest subphyla in arthropods more than 390 million years ago experiencing a rapid evolution an
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DAVENPORT: I ate a five-course meal with bugs, and I liked it

DAVENPORT: I ate a five-course meal with bugs, and I liked it | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I ate a five-course meal filled with bugs and absolutely loved it.

Bugeater Foods hosted the evening event in the Boiler Grand Hall at the Grand Manse April 22, offering the interesting experience. Speciality cook Wei Jiang of the Nebraska Club created the menu using products from Bugeater Foods, a product development company based in Lincoln,  which advocates that bugs are a sustainable high-protein and delicious.

I was apprehensive going into the dinner. I’ve eaten a wide range of weird things including duck head, donkey, scorpion and Taco Bell’s infamous waffle taco but never bugs. Regardless, I was excited going into it and had no idea what to expect.
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Eat the Beetles!: An Exploration of Our Conflicted Relationship with Insects: David Waltner-Toews: 9781770413146: Amazon.com: Books

Eat the Beetles!: An Exploration of Our Conflicted Relationship with Insects

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Edible insects are crawling to a plate near you, but don't cringe

Edible insects are crawling to a plate near you, but don't cringe | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Packaged foods with bugs as ingredients have been a popular topic in Western countries during the past three years, and now the conversation is creeping into Asia.

In Thailand, edible insects are now poised on supermarket shelves. Bugsolutely, founded in 2015 in Bangkok, is part of the rapidly growing market of 'bug food' with its cricket pasta product—the only pasta in the world containing 20 percent cricket flour, it claims.

Marketing it as a "superfood with high protein content" and "very low environmental impact", the cricket pasta has the same selling point as Exo’s cricket protein bars, which Kotaro Sasamoto of Dentsu Ventures described as "a granola bar with a hint of cricket".

“It may sound a bit strange, but it’s one of our ‘next big thing’ projects," Sasamoto said last year at a Cannes Lions seminar. "Processing protein from crickets is more efficient than doing the same from pigs and cows, and alleviates food shortage issues in the world.” Dentsu Ventures is an investment arm of Japan's advertising giant that last year staked an undisclosed sum in New York-based Exo.

Massimo Reverberi, founder of Bugsolutely, speaking at the Food and Beverage Innovation Forum 2017 in Shanghai last week, made a similar case for insects as an alternative source of protein, and insect-based consumer packaged goods (CPG) being the next big market.

Citing a 2013 report from the United Nations, he said edible insects may be a solution for the lack of protein to feed the world's population of 9 billion people come 2025.
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Insect Delicacies Becoming A Hit In Australian Eateries; Roasted Cockroach or Savory Critters, Anyone?

Insect Delicacies Becoming A Hit In Australian Eateries; Roasted Cockroach or Savory Critters, Anyone? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In the Western world, insects like cockroaches, bugs, or critters are considered pests. But in other regions such as Australia, Asia, Latin America, and Africa, insects are becoming a favorite diet. And as it grows in popularity, many people are wanting to try out it for curiosity's sake.
Man eating insects such as beetles, caterpillars, crickets, and others is nothing new. Yahoo reports that edible insects have been common in diets in regions such as Asia, Latin America, and Africa. In fact, the aborigines of Australia have eaten bush tucker such as ants, moths, and larvae for thousands of years. But you cannot tell that to Americans and other Western people who considers these creatures as pests.
The United Nations revealed that bugs have already been incorporated in the diet of more than two billion people across the globe. Compared to meat and dairy products, insects are high in protein, cheap to produce and uses much less carbon footprint. Some advocates of edible insects says that they can be helpful in combating a bulging global population and as traditional food supplies such as fish becomes scarce.
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Edible insects give Mexicans a taste of history – and maybe the future

Edible insects give Mexicans a taste of history – and maybe the future | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
At first glance, the stalls set up in this neighborhood garden look like they could be part of any typical farmer’s market. There are the men selling artisanal chocolates, the bread maker stacking her loaves precariously high, and the couple slinging tortillas over a smoking comal, or griddle.

But upon closer inspection, there’s something buggy about this scene. Literally.

A glistening cockroach is perched upon that square of chocolate. There are crispy brown grasshoppers cooked into that bread. And the tortillas? Smeared with fly eggs and garnished with a spicy green salsa.

This is the third annual Festival of Edible Insects, and the crowded passageways between the horseshoe of stalls is a testament to the growing resurgence in popularity of this centuries-old Mexican culinary tradition, amid a broader uptick of interest in Mexico's heritage that goes beyond its borders. 
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The swiss deputy behind the law on edible insects

The swiss deputy behind the law on edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A short talk with Isabelle Chevalley, deputy at the Swiss Parliament

You had a remarkable role in the new Swiss law on edible insects. Can you sum-up the story trough its most important steps?
The new food law gave a very broad definition of what a food is. Therefore, I only made an inquiry and ask the Federal Council if it thought that insects could fall within this definition. The answer was yes, and the door was open.
After that it was necessary to fight for a list of insects to appear in the ordinance associated with the law.
I also organized a great insects aperitif in the Swiss Parliament in order to make my colleagues get in touch with these new foods: it was a great success!

How did you get involved in the edible insects issue? Why did you decide to support this emerging sector?
I often go to Africa and it is there that I discovered insects, in particular in Burkina Faso where people consume caterpillars as delicacy. On the way back to Switzerland, I read a newspaper article which explained that consuming edible insects was forbidden in my country. As a liberal, it struck me because I did not understand why 2 billion people could consume insects and the swiss couldn’t.
It is not because we do not like something that we must forbid it.
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Cochineal / Insect-based color - Enews 24 Ghanta

Cochineal / Insect-based color - Enews 24 Ghanta | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
by Morgen Jahnke

When I was a kid, there was a time when artificial red food dyes came under intense scrutiny because of their purported health risks. In 1976, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the dye FD&C Red #2 because scientific studies showed it had carcinogenic effects on female rats. In response to the public concern about red food coloring, food manufacturers discontinued some of their red products, even if they didn’t contain Red #2. I remember this clearly because it meant that certain types of candy (such as M&Ms) no longer included red-colored pieces, and that I avoided any red candies I came across. More recently, another type of red food dye, FD&C #40, has been linked to increased hyperactivity in children, although it remains on the list of FDA-approved color additives.

Because of the controversy surrounding these artificial dyes, some food manufacturers have turned to another source of red coloring. Known as cochineal, or in some forms, carmine, this dye, produced from a type of insect native to South America and Mexico called the cochineal, has a history that goes back hundreds of years.

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Insect recipes to tempt squeamish Western palates in new cookbook - News Ahead

Grasshopper dumplings, bee larvae tacos and moth mousse are just some of the recipes featured in a new cookbook that aims to dispel Western squeamishness about eating insects, increasingly seen as a nutritious and environmentally friendly food.

"On Eating Insects: Essays, Stories and Recipes" features field research from Kenya, Uganda, Mexico, Thailand and other countries where many people consider insects a delicacy.

In parts of the world, especially Africa and Asia, hundreds of species of insects are regularly consumed but Western palates generally recoil from the prospect of eating crickets, termites and mealworms, despite their rich nutritional value.

A further benefit is that insect farming is likely to require less land than traditional livestock and produce fewer greenhouse gases, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organization.

Roberto Flore, co-author of the book, recognises that nutritional benefits alone are not enough to persuade nervous Westerners to swap beef, chicken and pork for bugs and wasps. They have to taste good too.
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Bugs for dinner? Aussie food trend grows legs

Bugs for dinner? Aussie food trend grows legs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
LOVE BUGS

Insects such as beetles, caterpillars, crickets and even spiders are common in diets across parts of Asia, Latin America and Africa, while Australia’s Aborigines have eaten bush tucker including ants, moths and larvae for thousands of years.

But they are a difficult sell in the Western world where people struggle to dissassociate the nutritional value from the source, with most insects considered pests.

“You have to name them something else,” suggested one El Toro patron when asked about overcoming fears of eating insects in Australia.
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Tokyo diners can't get enough of insect ramen

Tokyo diners can't get enough of insect ramen | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When the Ramen Nagi restaurant created a special insect-centric menu just for fun, it sold out within hours.

There are a lot of foods in Japan that cause visitors to raise a skeptical eyebrow. Dishes like fried chicken cartilage, fermented soy beans, and raw horse are hardly the sorts of foods we drool over back in North America, and the latest trend is no exception. Tokyo residents are now turning their attention to edible insects.

A well-known ramen restaurant called Ramen Nagi hosted a one-day event on April 9, preparing 100 bowls of insect-laden ramen called “insect tsukemen” that sold out in four hours. Photos from Reuters show people lining up in the rain outside Ramen Nagi, eager to try eating insects for the first time.

The noodles came topped with a dozen fried crickets and mealworms, which customers then dipped into soup flavored with cricket, grasshopper, or silkworm powders. The special menu included spring rolls with fried worms and ice cream made with insect powder.
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Protein Futures: There"s increased global interest in edible insects (Part 1)

Protein Futures: There"s increased global interest in edible insects (Part 1) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Written by Marie Sainabou Jeng
“It definitely has its own flavor. It’s savory but also a little bit sweet with a nutty flavor, and then with a smoky flavor from the fire,” says Zayaan Khan, South Africa’s leading expert on entomophagy.
She is explaining the taste of a mopane worm. “The texture is similar to prawns, with the softness but it also has a crunchiness.”
Global interest in edible insects has increased rapidly over the past few years.
Thanks to traditional food cultures, innovative top chefs, gutsy food start-ups and modern researchers, edible insects are beginning to be seen as a potential healthy, sustainable source of animal protein.
And Khan - “sovereign food activist” might be an appropriate title for her - is working to revive African indigenous people's food culture, a food culture in which insects are essential.
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Presentation from 16-17 November 2017 University of Liège (Belgium) 

Presentation from 16-17 November 2017 University of Liège (Belgium)  | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

We are delighted to invite you to this meeting that will be held at The University of Liège (Belgium) in the heart of Liège and on the banks of the River Meuse.  It runs from 16-17 November 2017.

Should we eat insects or feed our animals? Could insects be useful in (veterinary) medicine? What can we learn from Southern countries? Are insects safe? Those are only a few of the questions that will be addressed during this meeting.

Liège is an exciting and accessible city. A very current folklore kept alive by a positive-minded population, always ready for a feast, lively districts and a large number of restaurants all combine to make this an essential part of any trip to Belgium, not to mention its vigorous cultural and artistic life and a considerable architectural heritage.

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