Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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15 insects you won't believe are edible

15 insects you won't believe are edible | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What tastes like peanut butter? Or soft-shell crab? Or cinnamon? Why, grubs, scorpions and stinkbugs, of course. Find out why insects and spiders are just another food group in most parts of the world.
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Diary of a Bugs Journey - Invenire Market Intelligence

Diary of a Bugs Journey - Invenire Market Intelligence | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Can edible bugs have a real impact? Insects need to become big. For our sake, and for our planet. Follow our journey to revolutionise food production
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Edible insects is just one dream. And just one journey.

Taking up the challenge to create a better future is not a simple journey. There are challenges, hurdles and tests of commitment.

But the journey is also one of growth, new skills and deeper understanding. The path contains new friends and partners with common visions. And the destination is a better world with your dream a reality.

 

Anyone can be a Leader. You just have to start your journey."

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INSECTS AS FOOD AND FEED IN SOUTH ASIA: BUILDING THE 6 STRONG LEGS OF THE SECTOR  #AETS

INSECTS AS FOOD AND FEED IN SOUTH ASIA: BUILDING THE 6 STRONG LEGS OF THE SECTOR  #AETS | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
One for all and all for one! From Alexandre Dumas in the 19th century to the entomoculture actors in the 21st, the motto applies: the power of the group is the most powerful to defend a cause.

A main barrier limiting the development of a sustainable and innovative protein source i.e Insects, relies on education and awareness lack, from schools to regulators, from industry to research. Removing this barrier is a full-time job, and the outputs are beneficial to all stakeholders.

This is where an association makes sense, to join forces, aiming at a common goal: providing a food security, water and waste management tool to our challenging population growth.

The first meeting of the insects as food and feed group in South-east Asia will be held on the 23rd of August 2016, in Bangkok, Thailand, AETS office.
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Protein bars with best quality protein and sustainable. Would you like to try RONZO?

Published on Jul 24, 2016
NATURAL PATH TO HEALTHIER FUTURE!
Did you guess our riddle? Are you shocked? :)


LITTLE CHANGE IN DIET HUGE CHANGE TO EARTH
RONZO natural high-protein products made with crickets flour!
It's a natural substitute for artificial dietary supplements.

Why crickets?
Breeding insects use less food and water than livestock, insects also release fewer greenhouse gasses and less ammonia into the atmosphere. Our products are a combination of the demand of people for nutritional and healthy diet along with the improvement of the environment. Insects are incredibly high in protein. Cultures everywhere have been eating crickets for generations upon generations
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On the world menu: fried tarantulas and grasshopper tacos

Chef Aaron Sanchez toasts up grasshoppers (in Mexico they’re known as chapulines) and mixes them with chile and lime in his guacamole. Sample them at his New Orleans restaurant, Johnny Sanchez.

Chef Julia Medina created Tacos de Chapulines for her restaurant in New York City. The taco is filled with sauteed and dried grasshoppers and jalapenos, topped off with tomatillo salsa and guacamole.

Then, there’s Zack “The Cajun Bug Chef” Lemann’s Lightly Fried Dragonflies and chef Will Wienckowskis’ Roasted Cicadas. Author and chef Daniella Martin served one of the writers from “The Simpsons” shish-kabugs (which included crickets, scorpions, meal- and silkworms) at a bug-b-q in Los Angeles. That led to her (animated) appearance on that TV show.
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How bugs could be the food of the future according to Cambridge experts

How bugs could be the food of the future according to Cambridge experts | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Greg Dickens is helping companies to use insects as a key food ingredient. Credit: ITV News Anglia
Greg Dickens is helping companies find ways to use insects as food.
If you can get people talking about what would I like to eat- meat, vegetable or insect, it will make a huge difference not just to our health... but the impact we have on the planet and our countrywide ecosystem.

– GREG DICKENS, INNOVIA TECHNOLOGY
1,000 species of insect known to be eaten worldwide
Benefits of eating bugs:
High in protein
Generally more sustainable and environmentally friendly than other animal proteins
Emit fewer greenhouse gases and less ammonia than chicken, cows and pigs
They require less land and water than other animals
Ana C. Day's insight:
"One Cambridgeshire firm breeds fly larvae to create fuel for plants, animals and vehicles. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Another Cambridgeshire firm uses insects to create fuel.

Entomics breeds fly larvae, feeds them on food waste and then processes them into fuel for plants, animals and vehicles.

There's a certain species of insect that we use, the black soldier fly and black soldier fly lava are very efficient at converting food waste into complex fats and proteins as they grow.

They can reduce food waste volume by 95% over a two week growing cycle.

– MATTHEW MCLAREN, CEO ENTOMICS
Last updated Thu 21 Jul 2016"
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There’s Never Been a Better Time to Start Eating Crickets

There’s Never Been a Better Time to Start Eating Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
If I didn’t know any better, I was munching on potato chips. Only that’s not what I was chewing. I was really eating crickets.

It was my first time tasting the insect, or any insect for that matter. Entomophagy, or the act of eating insects, is practiced in many countries around the world, especially in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. But recently in New York City, among high-tech juice machines, stands of 3D-printed blueberries, and app-controlled veggie grow systems at future-food exposition called Food Loves Tech, I caught a taste of the cricket cuisine-culture of tomorrow,

Ask any of the food vendors here and there’s never been a better time to start eating crickets, mealworms, and other protein- and mineral-rich insects. They are in abundant supply as healthy alternatives to traditional meat products, empowering women in third world countries who eat them. Crickets can also be raised quickly—they grow from hatchling to full size in about six weeks—which advocates believe has the insects poised for a more active role in the future of food.
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Edible insects dinners in Hollywood

Edible insects dinners in Hollywood | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Passion for edible insects brings you to amazing people. I already met passionate scientists, determined politicians, highly-involved entrepreneurs, great bloggers…

But still not a worldwide known insect-enthusiast Chef!

Even though I am only an edible insects passionate student, determined to create a little documentary in Thailand aiming at promoting their consumption in the western societies, David George Gordon, also called The Bug Chef (http://davidgeorgegordon.com/the-bug-chef-2/) or even « Godfather of Insect Cuisine » nicely offered to Skype chat with me to share our passion and get to know about each other’s activities. It was a great honor for me to speak with the man that until today served bugs to more people than anyone in America and, quite possibly, the world.
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Ethical issues in the edible insects industry - Entomofago

Ethical issues in the edible insects industry - Entomofago | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Interview with Dr. Mickey Gjerris, Associated Professor in Bioethics at Copenhagen University

Can you tell us how did you get interested in the edible insects issues?
I have been working on issues within animal ethics for many years. When I saw the reports coming out on the possibility to turn insects into a mass provider of animal protein for food and feed, I became curious as to what extent the animal welfare issues and broader animal ethics questions concerning e.g. the killing of animals and the possible violation of their integrity had been addressed. We already have a range of domesticated animals within the food production system that raises a lot of academic and public debate. To what extent would these discussions be relevant to transfer to this new area?

When talking about massive animal breeding, including edible insects, we need to consider many ethical aspects. You’ve identified five critical areas, can you give us a specific overview of each one?
Enviromental impact:
Often intensive mass production of insects is promoted because of it´s higher degree of sustainability compared to more traditional production of animal protein, e.g. beef, pork, milk etc. But sustainability is an inherently vague concept that can be understood in a multitude of ways. And when you then compare different production systems and methods it becomes even more difficult to get clear answers as it is also necessary to discuss which alternatives should be included.
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Real Vegans Eat Insects: True or False? | The Travel Bug Bite: travel, edible insects, Prague, interview

Real Vegans Eat Insects: True or False? | The Travel Bug Bite: travel, edible insects, Prague, interview | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
 What is the purpose of veganism (and vegetarianism)?
 
If the ultimate goal is to help animals and there is proof that eating insects helps them, wouldn't it make sense to give it a try? Imagine saving an intelligent animal that could live up to 15 years (a cow) by eating an insect that has a lifespan that's measured in weeks and can be farmed without feeling the stress or pain that a mammal would. Wouldn't that be worth it?
 
Since my opinion is clearly biased, I decided to ask about this on Quora to see what other people thought. Most of the responses were clear: vegans don’t eat insects because they don’t eat any animals. This is totally understandable and a fair answer, however my favorite response was from ex-vegetarian Pavel Georgiev:
 
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Would you eat insects for dinner?

Would you eat insects for dinner? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When we engage with the animal kingdom in our food it’s almost without exception abstracted through the skilled hands of a butcher. Most of our animal proteins come pre-fabricated into convenient cuts that are nearly always headless but definitely hide-/feather- and gut-less. Even our language is abstracted as it relates to meat. These strategies exist for one purpose—to remove death from the dinner table. After all, food is about life.

Making insects palatable is a greater challenge for the mind than the mouth. For many, whole insects are intimidating, so we’re working to change that. A little over a year ago my brother Eli and I started C‑fu Foods, a company that uses food science to create new ingredients from insects including high protein meat replacers. By transforming bugs into “textured insect protein” (or ‘TIP’), tofu-like blocks of protein that cook like ground meat, we’re working to tear down mental walls preventing their consumption.
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Brooklyn Farm To Sell Cricket Snack Bites

Brooklyn Farm To Sell Cricket Snack Bites | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Jiminy Cricket might not be a fan of this.

CBS2’s Ali Bauman reported crickets from a farm in Brooklyn could soon be in New Yorkers’ kitchens.

Thousands of crickets have been harvested in Terraform One bio units at the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Co-founder Mitch Joachim said eating crickets isn’t just good for our health, but also good for our planet.

“It’s around 200 percent less water to make the same gram of protein from a cricket than it would be from something like cow,” Joachim said.

The bug farm was developed to study cheap protein alternatives for developing countries, but once Joachim saw how little space and water crickets require, he decided to bring them to the “Concrete Jungle.”
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Aspire Foods: Insects as nourishment

Aspire Foods:  Insects as nourishment | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In 2012, five M.B.A. students began developing an idea to address food insecurity in the world’s urban slums: insect farming. Not only did their idea win the world’s most prestigious social enterprise competition, they beat out ten-thousand other competitors and were presented the $1 million Hult Prize by former U.S. President, Bill Clinton.

Since winning the award, two of the students, Mohammed Ashour and Gabe Mott, launched Aspire Foods Group. It’s a social enterprise focused on farming edible insects. It has operations in Mexico, Ghana, and the United States. Compared to livestock, insects require far less resources to convert the same amount of protein; less farmland, less water, and emit far fewer greenhouse gases.

“Now we’re looking at the footprint of our food,” explained Ashour. “How much water resources has it consumed? How much energy? How much land? What are the emissions looking like? That’s where insect farming becomes extremely attractive.”
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Part 2 in Edible Insects for Food and Feed Series: Overview of insect farming; Where, What Species and Areas for Future Research | Food Climate Research Network (FCRN)

Part 2 in Edible Insects for Food and Feed Series: Overview of insect farming; Where, What Species and Areas for Future Research | Food Climate Research Network (FCRN) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Submitted by wendylumcgill on 11 Jul 2016 - 1:25pm.
This is the second post in the blog-series on Insects for Food and Feed by Wendy Lu McGill who is a PhD candidate at the National University of Ireland at Galway’s Plant and Agribiosciences Centre (link is external). She is using a research for development perspective to examine political, cultural and regulatory aspects of how insect farming could work in practice in places where insect eating is most common, while comparing it to how insect farming is operating in the Global North as a novel food production practice. In her first blog-post of the series she focused on insect farming for human consumption, this post discusses insect farming more in detail with a breakdown by region and in her next post she will focus more on insects for feed and regulations and consumer perception of insects as food.
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Cockroach milk might be the superfood of the future

Cockroach milk might be the superfood of the future | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cockroach milk is four times as nutritious as cow's milk and it could be the key to feeding our growing population in the future. Barnaby Chambers/Shutterstock

An international team of scientists has just sequenced a protein crystal located in the midgut of cockroaches. The reason?

It’s more than four times as nutritious as cow’s milk and, the researchers think it could be the key to feeding our growing population in the future.

Although most cockroaches don’t actually produce milk, Diploptera punctate, which is the only known cockroach to give birth to live young, has been shown to pump out a type of ‘milk’ containing protein crystals to feed its babies.

The fact that an insect produces milk is pretty fascinating – but what fascinated researchers is the fact that a single one of these protein crystals contains more than three times the amount of energy found in an equivalent amount of buffalo milk (which is also higher in calories then dairy milk).
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A Mouth Full of Crickets? Lobbyists Speak Up for Edible Insects

A Mouth Full of Crickets? Lobbyists Speak Up for Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
At the Oyamel Cocina Mexicana in Washington, metal butterfly mobiles hang from the ceiling and bugs are on the menu.
The chapulines tacos are jammed with thumb-sized roasted grasshoppers, a delicacy head chef Colin King cooks in tequila and chipotle puree and serves with shallots.
“There’s a lot of instances when people try them for the first time where, if they can get over the mental aspect of it, then they end up really liking them," King said. "I know I went through that when I first tried them.”
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Connoisseurs of edible insects say more and more people are coming to like such dishes, which represent an untapped source of environmentally sustainable protein. And the industry is getting organized to push for further consumer -- and government -- acceptance.

At a conference of bug-eaters held in May in Detroit, the North American Edible Insect Coalition was organized. It plans to announce a lobbying campaign in a few months to convince the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to add mealworms, crickets protein powder and other insect products to the agency’s database of Generally Recognized as Safe ingredients, or GRAS."

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Could insect protein feed the world? asks Innovia

Could insect protein feed the world? asks Innovia | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
25/07/2016

Innovia says that textured chunks of insect protein would provide a sustainable alternative to animal meat. “The Harper Adams University's 'Edible Bug Challenge' isn’t so far-fetched,” says Greg Dickens, a vet and consultant at Innovia Technology. “Insect flour is already available and 'Quorn-style' high-protein pieces are on the way”
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The Edible Bug Challenge is a move by Harper Adams University to encourage the public to be more open to other sources of protein – such as insects and other bugs – which are widely eaten in other cultures.

Greg Dickens is no stranger to eating bugs: “I lived in Nigeria for most of 2014, where insects are part of the diet. So I've eaten a wide range of bugs, larval and adult, raw and cooked, live and not.

“Since I got home, I've been eating a lot more bugs from the garden. I guess I've probably enjoyed about 50% of them.”

Innovia is at the forefront of breakthrough innovation and challenges its clients – international brands from a wide range of markets and industries – to consider radical solutions to intractable problems. Greater use of insect protein is one way that the nutritional value of food can be increased sustainably."

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Students try to overcome the 'yuck' factor in Bug-Eating 101

Students try to overcome the 'yuck' factor in Bug-Eating 101 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
UCLA lecturer Andy Rice introduces his students to entomophagy, bug eating, which may someday become a smart alternative to resource-intensive foods such a
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Polish startup Ronzo is designing capsules of cricket powder for bodybuilders

Polish startup Ronzo is designing capsules of cricket powder for bodybuilders | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With a Kickstarter in the works, Ronzo is readying itself to enter the burgeoning American sports nutrition market offering capsules of cricket powder, which the company says is packed with essential protein and amino acids.
“We did a study on Europeans and [concluded] that the "fear" of an insect in the capsule is lower than, for example, in protein bars,” Jacek Janicki, CEO of Ronzo , told NutraIngredients-USA.

With an increasing demand for nutrient-dense food products and more consumer consciousness about environmental welfare, Janicki added that cricket powder supplements geared towards bodybuilders has all the makings to break the insect ingredient out of the niche and into the mainstream.

Established in 2015, the company has launched protein bars and cereals with limited distribution in Poland. Its products and concept has won the startup many accolades, winning first place out of all of Poland’s entries for the EU-wide Climate Launchpad competition in 2015 , as well as winning a spot as one of Poland’s top 23 startups .
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Lovely grub, say Hong Kong’s insect eaters: delicious, nutritious and good for the planet

Lovely grub, say Hong Kong’s insect eaters: delicious, nutritious and good for the planet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Restaurant owner Amy Wong Ling says it was her husband’s idea to serve insects when the couple moved to Hong Kong from Yunnan.
“My husband had the idea of introducing Yunnan insects to Hong Kong – they were not available on city menus back then. It’s a bit of a gimmick,” says Wong, placing a plate of crunchy grasshoppers on the table.
The bee pupae tastes sweet – like a fried doughnut – while grasshoppers, with their spindly legs, are crunchy in texture, the body tasting like an overfried chip.
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Meet Iowa's first edible-cricket farmer

Meet Iowa's first edible-cricket farmer | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
While farmers are no rarity in this eastern Iowa town of 600, Herman's operation stands alone. Her farm, the Iowa Cricket Farmer, is the state's first insect farm growing critters for the purposes of human consumption.

It's believed to be among a handful of cricket farms across the country capitalizing on a trend of health-conscious foodies munching on insects.

The farm's 50,000 to 60,000 crickets have been raised so far to be breeders. Herman expects to deliver the first batch bound for human stomachs this summer.

They'll be sent to Salt Lake City and ground into cricket flour for Chapul, the maker of cricket protein bars and protein powder made famous on the television show "Shark Tank."

While there is inherent novelty to the operation, the Iowa Cricket Farmer looks more like a science lab than a playground.
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Crickets are the Protein of the Future (#Trust) - Food 2.0, Episode 4

Published on Jul 15, 2016
Crickets might not be your go-to source for protein...yet. But Tiny Farms and Bitty Foods in Silicon Valley are working to change that. For more food and restaurant videos subscribe to Zagat here: http://goo.gl/AaWZHT.
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15 Of The Best Shark Tank Products Saving The World - Forbes

15 Of The Best Shark Tank Products Saving The World - Forbes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Some of the smartest minds to pitch on ABC’s hit business reality show Shark Tank have created products that are saving the world. Here’s a look at 15 of the best earth-friendly products from over the past seven seasons that reduce pollution, conserve natural resources or improve the environment in an innovative way.

1. Chapul

Crickets are the leanest and greenest way to produce protein for a world that’s growing by 75 million mouths every year. Raising crickets calls for only 8% of the feed and water used by cows to produce the same amount of protein.  And they produce only 1% of the greenhouse gasses that cows do. Chapul makes cricket protein bars, protein powder and baking powder. Bars average $3 each, powders are $39 and $15, respectively.  
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One to watch: The Friday studio

One to watch: The Friday studio | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Dan Craig and Matt Genefaas have not chosen the easy road.

As well as managing their studio/showroom The Friday, they also manage their two brands: Crawlers (edible insects and framed insect art) and Made of Tomorrow (homewares and stationery).

Craig says it's all go all the time and highly stressful, but definitely worth it. "I left school at 15 and always knew I never wanted a regular job." 
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In the future, we’ll all eat worms | Crosscut

In the future, we’ll all eat worms | Crosscut | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The process could have big implications for the environment. Chicken feed tends to incorporate its protein from other sources, most commonly from soy. Clearing land for soy production has been one of the biggest contributors to global deforestation. This is something Emery witnessed firsthand while doing academic fieldwork in the Amazon: “I was seeing the types of things I wanted to be studying disappearing,” she said.

If mealworms, which are the larval form of the darkling beetle, can be grown at scale in high-density indoor farms, it could take some of the pressure off other types of protein used for chicken feed. And bugs are a natural part of a chicken’s diet, anyway.
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Time to Enjoy Insect Delicacy as Cricket Farming Takes Root in Kenya | Mwakilishi.com

Time to Enjoy Insect Delicacy as Cricket Farming Takes Root in Kenya | Mwakilishi.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
They have become a valuable source of income to a group of farmers in Nyanza region.
Crickets are black/brown insects that belong to the class insecta, order Orthoptera and genus Acheta. They are categorised into two groups; house cricket and field cricket.
It is the house cricket (Acheta domesticus) that is widely reared in Nyanza region of Kenya, where some organisations have trained a number of youth and women groups to empower them with this entrepreneurial activity.
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Insects: Food Fad or New Industry? | IFT16 News

Insects: Food Fad or New Industry? | IFT16 News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible Insects: Moving Beyond Sensationalism to Industrialization
Session 051
Monday, July 18, 12:30–2:00 p.m.
Room S402ab

Various start-up companies offering novel insect-based foods and ingredients have entered the market in recent years, promising a source of high-quality animal protein with a substantially lower ecological footprint than vertebrate livestock. Is this a fad or can it move up to a full-scale industry?

Ongoing research is leading to a better understanding of the opportunities in the edible insect industry, with many insects containing very high amounts of protein with complete amino acid profiles, as well as unique functionality and nutritional benefits. Insect production offers the potential for significant reduction in resources required to produce safe, affordable, and highly acceptable foods and ingredients in response to global concerns over the need for food with a minimal ecological footprint.
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