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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Imagine you're hungry. Which insect would you be most prepared to eat?

Imagine you're hungry. Which insect would you be most prepared to eat? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Times Food wants to know... Imagine you're hungry. Which insect would you be most prepared to eat? pick one: Catepillar, Bee larvae, Crickets, Locusts or Worms
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Your Meatless Future: Burger Options for the Protein Apocalypse

Your Meatless Future: Burger Options for the Protein Apocalypse | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The global demand for meat could soon double — but science is hard at work on alternatives.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Option 2: Eating Very Alternative Proteins, Like Bugs
Angelina Jolie is doing it, and more people in the developed world are starting to catch on to what the poorest people on the planet have always known: Bugs and worms are good for you, and they're everywhere.
Pros: Insects are packed with protein, fiber, and nutrients like iron, magnesium, and zinc, and they're already dinner for about 2 billion people worldwide. Crickets allegedly taste like popcorn. Also, bugs reproduce quickly, are great for the environment, and feed on human and food waste.
Cons: Ick.

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World’s first $332,000 lab-grown burger to change the global diet

World’s first $332,000 lab-grown burger to change the global diet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A Dutch scientist is offering the world’s first cultivated beef made of stem cells to taste. He believes the lab-grown meat will feed the world and help save the environment.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The report also encourages people to be more creative and diversify their diet to include beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, worms, wasps and bees. For example, “most edible insects boast equal or higher iron content than beef,” the report suggests. More than two billion people – mostly in Asia, Africa, and Latin America consume insects, according to the article.

For example, 100g of insects is 72 percent protein and clock in at 96 calories and 16 per cent fat. The same weight in beef is 52 percent protein, and clocks in at 285 calories and 48 per cent fat, ctvnews.ca calculated. 

An Austrian designer was reportedly turned the UN recommendation to “eat insects” into a household appliance producing 2.4 kilograms of larvae protein from black soldier fly eggs.  One week’s worth of harvest (500 g) produces enough larvae for about two meals, according to ctvnews.ca"

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Tempura-battered tarantula on menu at California bug fest | Deccan Chronicle

Tempura-battered tarantula on menu at California bug fest | Deccan Chronicle | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Hungry? How about tempura-battered fried Tarantula for an appetizer?
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Ants, Beetles, Cockroaches, Worms: A Greener White Meat? : Living Green Magazine

Ants, Beetles, Cockroaches, Worms: A Greener White Meat? : Living Green Magazine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ana C. Day's insight:

"But although insects may be gaining traction, they aren’t likely to become mainstream anytime soon. Though EDIBL’s programs are popular among students, Chen, a graduating senior, has had trouble finding someone to take over club leadership. Few, she said, have much experience cooking, much less cooking insects, and knowing where to buy the bugs can also be a challenge."

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Bring on the Bugs | Solutions

Bring on the Bugs | Solutions | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ana C. Day's insight:

"We come from a long line of bug eaters. Our earliest primate ancestors were insectivores, and our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees, make rudimentary tools to fish termites out of narrow tunnels in their mounds. Among the laws of Leviticus codified by the Israelites millennia ago is permission to eat “the locust after its kind, and the bald locust after its kind, and the cricket after its kind, and the grasshopper after its kind."

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Food Standards Agency - Views wanted on edible insect consumption

Food Standards Agency - Views wanted on edible insect consumption | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The FSA is seeking information from relevant groups on the sale and consumption of whole insects and other animals, such as worms, in the UK, including details of species that are currently on sale.

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Ana C. Day's curator insight, February 2, 2013 9:16 AM

"Further information about the issue can be found in the letter below, which was sent to interested parties on 12 August 2011.

Any relevant information should be emailed to the Agency's Novel Foods Unit atnovelfoods@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk by Friday 2 September 2011. Interested parties unable to meet this deadline should email the Novel Foods Unit as soon as possible."

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entomophagy, eating insects, eating bugs, bugs, insects, food, bugs as food

entomophagy, eating insects, eating bugs, bugs, insects, food, bugs as food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Entomophagy is the concept and practice of eating insects.
The idea of eating insects is not a new ideology.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"A good argument in favor of ingesting some creepy crawling insects is there fast reproduction and minimal resource usage. When compared with a cow or pig or even poultry, an insect colony would need to consume far less food to maintain them. Traditional livestock also require veterinary care. Insect life cycle is rather short as compared to a cattle where months need to go by before it is ready for slaughter house and our dinner tables. "

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Gourmet Insects, A Delicacy To Counter Climate Change - Ideas Galore

Gourmet Insects, A Delicacy To Counter Climate Change - Ideas Galore | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The insects are already a major source of protein elsewhere in the world. Caterpillars and locusts are popular in Africa, wasps as a delicacy in Japan, crickets are eaten in Thailand.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The idea has the backing of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, which warns that the production of meat like beef and pork as sources of protein taxes the environment, estimating that almost one fifth of all greenhouse gas emissions comes from livestock that has contributed to climate change."

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Overcoming the Yuckiness of Eating Bugs Can Help Save the World / Why You Should Love Grasshopper Tacos and Kelp Pasta.

Overcoming the Yuckiness of Eating Bugs Can Help Save the World / Why You Should Love Grasshopper Tacos and Kelp Pasta. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Read more from Slate’s special issue on the future of food. About 200 years ago, the lobster was regarded by most Americans as a filthy, bottom-feeding scavenger unfit for consumption by civilized people.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Many insects are what you might call superfood—rich in protein, low in fat and cholesterol, high in essential vitamins and minerals like calcium and iron. More important, insects are green super-foods. Bugs are cold-blooded (they don’t waste energy to stay warm), so they’re far more efficient at converting feed to meat than cattle or pigs. Ten grams of feed produces one gram of beef or three grams of pork, but it can yield nine grams of edible insect meat, according research from Arnold van Huis, an entomologist at Wageningen University."

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Bugged about going green? Try these - Video on NBCNews.com

Bugged about going green? Try these - Video on NBCNews.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Video on msnbc.com: July 24, 2009: Crumbled meal worms. Sautéed crickets. Ant eggs. Hungry yet? Marc Dennis, founder of Insects Are Food, explains how eating these dishes could help the environment. Msnbc.com’s Becca Field puts it to the test.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Check out video =)

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Bug-a-Boo’s or Grubs Up

Bug-a-Boo’s or Grubs Up | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

On this site are several articles about edible insects (among other creatures.) Below is an expanding collection of more than 50 edible insects. I plan to localize it. There is, depending on who’s counting,  an estimated 1,462 species of edible insects.

Ana C. Day's insight:

Very nice pictures and lots of Ants data.

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Edible insects with Girl Meets Bug (Wired UK)

Edible insects with Girl Meets Bug (Wired UK) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In order to get some culinary creepy crawly insights for Wired.co.uk's Bug Week, we spoke to Daniella Martin, practitioner of entomophagy and host of the Girl Meets Bug edible insect blog
Ana C. Day's insight:

The World Bank estimates that our planet is home to almostseven billion humans. In order to put something on the global dinner table each night, we farm approximately 50 billion chickens, 1.3 billion cattle and almost one billion pigs each year.


Great insides from the industry and recepies from Daniella Martin @GirlMeetsBug

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Fancy a meal of insects, anybody? - Nation | The Star Online

Fancy a meal of insects, anybody? - Nation | The Star Online | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

CRUNCHY bursts of nutty flavours filled with nutritious goodness – that’s basically what you get from a meal of insects, or so they say.

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Ants, Spiders and Cockroaches: Saving the World...One Mouthful at a Time - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Ants, Spiders and Cockroaches: Saving the World...One Mouthful at a Time - SPIEGEL ONLINE | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Westerners might get a bit queasy when they think about eating locusts, spiders or ants, but they make up delicacies and key sources of protein in much of the world.
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The trend of eating insects - News VietNamNet

The trend of eating insects - News VietNamNet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
 VietNamNet Bridge - Recently, FAO has informed that nearly two
billion people in the world have been eating insects in different level.
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How eating insects could solve world hunger - Features - Scotsman.com

How eating insects could solve world hunger - Features - Scotsman.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When the United Nations announced that we could all fight world hunger by eating more insects, most Scots probably turned green at the thought.
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How to Eat Scary Insects, Worms, and Bugs in Thailand

How to Eat Scary Insects, Worms, and Bugs in Thailand | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eating insects, worms, and bugs is a very popular snack in Thailand. The bugs are often deep fried and salted before being served!
Ana C. Day's insight:

AMAZING PICTURES !!!

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Best Bugs for the Budding Bug-Eater - Forbes

Best Bugs for the Budding Bug-Eater - Forbes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A friend just sent me the menu of a well known French restaurant that features a selection of surprising delicacies. Here are the choices: crickets (domestic and black), grasshoppers, giant water bugs, and worms (bamboo and silk).
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Some of the good reasons to consider insect cuisine:

- One billion people on Earth are insufficiently fed.

- In 30 years, global population will total 9+ billion, translating into intense pressure on agricultural land, water, forests, fisheries and other resources.

- Beef prices will continue to rise as rainforests are destroyed to make space for cattle.

The London “Pestival” offers more good reasons to consider “the deliciousness of insects” and the truly burning question: “Who is more of a pest?”"

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AP News : Worms: A Zimbabwe snack, from tree to dinner table

AP News : Worms: A Zimbabwe snack, from tree to dinner table | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

At the local market, mopane worms are popular with residents who buy a cup or two of them and eat them immediately. The market is abuzz with activity, with most stalls strategically displaying the delicacy so people cannot miss them. Vendors offer free samples.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"

HIGH PROTEIN

The mopane worm is a healthful and cheap source of nutrition.

A Zimbabwean nutritionist, Marlon Chidemo, says the worms are high in healthy nutrients and contain three times the amount of protein as beef. He says eating worms is less taxing on the environment than consuming beef because it takes far fewer leaves to produce worms than it does feed to produce the same amount of beef.

WORMY BUSINESS

Dried mopane worms have become a multimillion-dollar industry, even exported to countries like South Africa and Botswana. They can be found in African restaurants in Paris."

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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, January 31, 2013 6:15 AM

Mignon, J. (2002). "A l’heure où l’on parle tant du respect de la biodiversité, il ne faut pas oublier les menaces qu’une pratique intensive de captures à des fins alimentaires (pour l’homme ou les animaux d’élevage) fait peser sur de nombreuses espèces d’insectes. Il faut que les populations en plein développement démographique prennent conscience du fragile équilibre de la nature et qu’elles développent des moyens permettant de remplacer la récolte in natura par le petit élevage. Divers projets locaux sont actuellement développés en Afrique afin non seulement de protéger certaines espèces mais surtout pour maintenir et renforcer l’apport protéinique à certaines populations."

 

http://www.tropicultura.org/text/v20n3/151.pdf

 

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Bugs Benedict / Which backyard insects are best to eat?

Bugs Benedict / Which backyard insects are best to eat? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A man died Friday after eating scores of cockroaches, worms, and millipedes in a contest. Last year, Slate explained which bugs are safest to eat. The article is reprinted below.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Even venomous insects are usually OK to eat if you cook them. Heat changes the chemical structure of the venom, rendering it harmless. Scorpions, for example, are a delicacy in parts of Asia. Nervous diners can cut off the end of the tail, where the venom gland and stinger are located, but Asian gourmands usually eat the whole bug."

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Eating Worms: More Than Just a Juvenile Torture Device, a Way to Save the Earth

Eating Worms: More Than Just a Juvenile Torture Device, a Way to Save the Earth | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

A recent study confirms mealworm farming is more eco-friendly than beef or dairy, but will it catch on?

Ana C. Day's insight:

"If the thought of putting a once-wriggling creature on your tongue sends a shudder through your spine, you’re not alone. But what if you knew that these mealy little worms were the most sustainable protein source available today? What’s more important, our ick-factor, or our planet?"

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Mealworms could be tucker of the future.

Mealworms could be tucker of the future. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Some Dutch researchers have come up with a novel idea (at least to Westerners) to save the planet - eat worms. Mealworms, to be precise - they're actually beetle larvae, or worms with legs.

Ana C. Day's insight:

EXCELLENT TITLE, that is exactly it !!! INSECTS are the TUCKER of the industry, like  The story of Preston Tucker, the maverick car designer and his ill-fated challenge to the auto industry with his revolutionary car concept. !!!!!

 

"If the same research that has gone into the larger farm animals can be put into the worms, then their potential is enormous"

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Ana C. Day's curator insight, January 17, 2013 12:22 AM

EXCELLENT TITLE, that is exactly it !!! INSECTS are the TUCKER of the industry, like  The story of Preston Tucker, the maverick car designer and his ill-fated challenge to the auto industry with his revolutionary car concept. !!!!!

 

"If the same research that has gone into the larger farm animals can be put into the worms, then their potential is enormous"

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Scientists Propose Mealworms As Protein Source of the Future, Soylent Green Suddenly Not Sounding So Bad

Scientists Propose Mealworms As Protein Source of the Future, Soylent Green Suddenly Not Sounding So Bad | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Be it a slice or ten of bacon in the morning or a good steak for dinner, most meat shares a common bond -- it is pretty awesome to eat. While this is clearly the best thing about meat, it is also one of the biggest knocks against it.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Not so bad at all !!!

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Mealworms: The Next High-Protein Food Source?

Mealworms: The Next High-Protein Food Source? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Scientists have conducted enormous tests on mealworms and discovered the fact that super worms and mealworms could be the future high protein food source.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The researchers have compared the meat production impact of mealworms to traditional animals. The 3 parameters which they have used for comparing are energy needs, greenhouse-gas emissions and land usage. During the process of conducting tests they found that mealworms are rich in edible proteins when compared to the chicken, milk, beef and pork."

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