Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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A Taste Of The Future Of Food

Transcript CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST: Unless you've been hiding under a burger bun for the past week, you've probably heard the story about the lab
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HEADLEE: One of the other things that's just coming up recently is the idea of insects as food. And, in fact, you can actually do searches on the Internet and find restaurants that feature either ground-up insects or insects whole.

(LAUGHTER)

HEADLEE: Could we be seeing more and more insects creeping into our food?

GAYE: It's already quite popular in a few European countries, especially the Netherlands where they're, year on year, growing and selling many more insects. But also, there are countries like Australia where they've decided to call locusts flying prawns or flying shrimp, and they found that people eat them much more readily if they have a different name. But also, ground-up grasshoppers ground into bars such as muesli bars with fruits and nuts, using a cricket flower. People actually don't know it's insects at all.

So, I think when we grind them up and we make insect patties - mixed with vegetables and onions - people don't really know any different.

HEADLEE: Have you eaten them?

GAYE: I have eaten them. Actually pretty good and they all taste quite differently; some are quite cheesy, others are a bit like lemon, and some are sort of nutty. And I think that's it really is just about the way we're socialized around animals and insects where we think, ew, creepy crawlies or bugs or they're dirty. But the way in which they're bred is actually incredibly hygienic. They love to be bred in captivity in small spaces."

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Nutritious, Cheap, and Plentiful –Why not eat insects?

Nutritious, Cheap, and Plentiful –Why not eat insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Have you ever eaten an insect?  I have.  In the larval stage –steamed and buttered.  It was the size of a plump raisin, but green, and tasted like fresh steamed broccoli.  Actually, I believe I ate quite a few.  Does...
Ana C. Day's insight:

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What’s Holding Us Back?

It’s definitely not the nutritional profile.  Could it be our climate?  According to the FAO, given our climate and the fact that insects are cold-blooded, many developed nations have been at a disadvantage in terms of insect variety, size, and abundance.  This may be why we don’t have a long history of eating them.  In the tropics, insects are larger, more varied, and available year round.  In our climate, the insects are smaller and not always available due to hibernation.

While this explanation sounds feasible, it doesn’t make sense for the southernmost portion of the United States. You have to wonder why Southerners have failed to embrace insect cuisine.  They seem to be fumigating excellent food down there."

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Waiter, What’s This Maggot Doing in My Soup?

Waiter, What’s This Maggot Doing in My Soup? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
As a boy growing up in rural Missouri, I was very interested in insects and ended up with a rather sizable collection of mounted specimens that I took to the local 4-H fair. Later, when I became a ...
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Twitter / Entomovores : Bug parts in daily food products ...

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David Couchon's curator insight, October 14, 2013 4:42 PM

déjà, sans le savoir

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And like everything else we hold dear, we’ll screw this up mightily | Singlebarbed

And like everything else we hold dear, we’ll screw this up mightily | Singlebarbed | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Science suggests that with most arable land under cultivation and with the world’s oceans under duress, the only unexploited source of food remaining is INSECTS

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Bug Appétit: Barriers to Entomophagy | NutritionFacts.org

Bug Appétit: Barriers to Entomophagy | NutritionFacts.org | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Consumer acceptance is the main barrier to the consumption of edible insects.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Short Video !!

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FDA Allows Mold, Insects, Rodent Hairs, Ammonia, Arsenic and Maggots In ‘Reconditioned’ Food

FDA Allows Mold, Insects, Rodent Hairs, Ammonia, Arsenic and Maggots In ‘Reconditioned’ Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Activist Post By Susanne Posel In order to save money, some corporations will repackage older food into new packaging and resell it.
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The FDA admits they expect a certain level of contaminants and toxins to enter food during the processing process because they claim a zero-tolerance policy would be too difficult to achieve.

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TEDxObserver - Jason Drew

Is this the answer to the world's fish crisis? In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TED has created a program called TEDx. TEDx is a program of local, sel...
Ana C. Day's insight:

This is by far one of my favorite person in the industry, You must see this video !!! Thank you Mr. Drew

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