Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
182.5K views | +35 today
Follow
Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Is it legal to farm insects (for human consumption) in the UK? - The Bug Shack

Is it legal to farm insects (for human consumption) in the UK? - The Bug Shack | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I was uncertain for a long time about whether or not it was legal to farm insects for human consumption in the UK. It’s hard to find a yes/no answer to that, so I thought I’d find out for myself. Here’s the short version:

Is it legal to sell insects in the UK for human consumption? Yes, certain species.
Is it legal to farm insects in the UK for human consumption? Yes, for now.
Is it legal to farm insects for animal feed in the UK? No, not for land animals; it is allowed for fish.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Would you eat insects for their nutritional value?

Would you eat insects for their nutritional value? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A bush-tucker trial is heading to Costessey, with visitors to this year’s Royal Norfolk Show being invited to take on the challenge.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Mealworms, grasshoppers and locusts will be among the moveable feast on offer to iron-bellied men, women and children who are prepared to taste the unexpected as part of the Harper Adams University Edible Bug Challenge."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Edible insects: Would you eat a protein bar made of crickets?

Edible insects: Would you eat a protein bar made of crickets? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Ant and Dec have a lot to answer for. The television presenters are unwittingly helping to block one of the most logical and healthy solutions to an impending European protein shortage; edible insects.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"The projections are stark. Livestock farming is becoming unsustainable. Soya, the main protein source in animal feed, costs up to £1,000 a ton and it takes 25kg of soya to rear 1kg of beef. Domestically we only produce 2 per cent of the soya we need."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Can insects go from pests to popular snack foods?

Can insects go from pests to popular snack foods? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Several U.S. companies aim to eliminate the yuck factor and get people to eat protein-rich bugs.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"An increasing number of “entopreneurs” are launching businesses to feed a growing appetite for crickets, mealworms and other edible insects. (“Ento” comes from the Greek word for insect.) 

These upstarts are trying to persuade more Americans to eat bugs, which can be produced with less land, food and water than other sources of animal protein."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Bay Area 'Entopreneurs' Feed Growing Appetite For Edible Insects

Bay Area 'Entopreneurs' Feed Growing Appetite For Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
They hop. They crawl. They squirm. And they could be coming to a dinner plate near you.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"An increasing number of “entopreneurs” are launching businesses to feed a growing appetite for crickets, mealworms and other edible insects.

These upstarts are trying to persuade more Americans to eat bugs, which can be produced with less land, food and water than other sources of animal protein."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

EU citizens should eat more insects, says industry

EU citizens should eat more insects, says industry | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The mealworm, silkworms, the housefly and the black soldier fly are some of the insects Europeans should have as a natural part of their diet in the future as they are a good source for protein, says the insects sector.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"The International Platform of Insects for Food and Feed (IPIFF) wants to promote insects as a source for animal protein for both human consumption and animal feed."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Dining with Insects and Wine

Dining with Insects and Wine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FARGO, N.D. -
A trending tasting event, is creeping and crawling its way into Fargo.

Dozens of people took part in wine and bug sampling for the Northern Plains Botanic Garden Society.

If you're allergic to seafood, you may want to skip the insects.But for this group of fifty, they decided to take a bite out of nature.

You may cringe, scream or squash any insect you meet. But for this group, it's a different story, they're paring crickets, grasshoppers and even scorpions with wine.

But why?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Jungle Bars are boosted with powdered cricket protein

Jungle Bars are boosted with powdered cricket protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
"Our mission is to change peoples' opinion towards edible insects by offering them a normal looking protein bar that tastes good," said product design graduate Búi Bjarmar Aðalsteinsson, who is leading the project.

According to the designer, crickets contain a high protein content, as well as minerals like iron and calcium.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

"Future Food Utrecht: How can science feed the world?" - Universiteit Utrecht

"Future Food Utrecht: How can science feed the world?" - Universiteit Utrecht | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Future Food Utrecht is a new focus area of Utrecht University to bundle its research potential on the grand societal challenges regarding food. This focus area provides an integrated approach to address the development of sustainable and healthy future food concepts that are acceptable and accessible for the human population. On April 15th 2015 Future Food Utrecht organizes the event: “Future Food Utrecht: How can science feed the world?”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Shailene Woodley Eats Bugs, Calls Insects the 'Future of Food'

Shailene Woodley Eats Bugs, Calls Insects the 'Future of Food' | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Shailene Woodley is keeping her hippy persona alive thanks to her recent quotes about eating all types of bugs.

After a series of oddball interviews and her stroll through New York City barefoot, the 23-year-old Insurgent star was eager to share with Nylonmagazine that she consumes insects. "I've eaten ants and that was great. And June bugs, that was great," she reveals in a video for the publication. "I think the future of food is in insects, so we’ll see what happens."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Could squirmy livestock dent Africa’s protein deficit? - Nelson Institute | News

Could squirmy livestock dent Africa’s protein deficit? - Nelson Institute | News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
As a cheap and easy source of protein for humans, it might be hard to beat the mighty mealworm. Graduate students Rachel Bergmans and Valerie Stull are researching the use of mealworms as an inexpensive microlivestock.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

The insectivore’s dilemma, and how to take the West out of it

The insectivore’s dilemma, and how to take the West out of it | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Abstract

A number of health and agricultural organizations have been encouraging Westerners to integrate insects into their diet, without success. Appealing to consumer’s reason and responsibility, as they do, is likely to reinforce a dilemma in the mind of consumers: Many know that they can, in principle, eat insects, and perhaps that they should eat some, but very few are willing to eat them. Here we argue that current strategies are on the wrong track in identifying the key obstacle as a question of negative representation of insects. Decades of laboratory research, as well as years of experience in gastronomy, suggest that people’s food choices are relatively immune to rational changes of representation, and instead tend to be driven by taste preferences and exposure. Here we suggest an alternative sensorially-driven strategy, which stands a much greater chance of making people eat insects on a regular basis. The turn - or better said return - to entomophagy in this sense, needs to be driven by a psychologically realistic motivation and gastronomic interest.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

What do insects and sensors have in common?

What do insects and sensors have in common? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ask any foodie worth her salt what the next big thing in food will be, and she might tell you it's something small: insects. Long used as a food source in other cultures, insects are now coming into vogue in the United States among diners who are at once environmentally conscious and adventurous.
Currently, the meat industry produces 14.5 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). It is also a major user of water.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Are You Ready For A Diet Of Insects?

Are You Ready For A Diet Of Insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Tyrades! By Danny Tyree When I was a six-year-old lad lusting over the "ant farm" advertisements in 12-cent comic books, I had no idea how ahead-of-their-time those ads were. According to the April...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"According to the April 10 “Newsweek,” entrepreneurs, restaurateurs and farmers are scrambling to cash in on using processed insects for food. Buoyed by a 2013 United Nations report and funding from the United States Department of Agriculture, they hope to reinvent Americans’ idea of desirable food sources and get a leg up (six legs up?) on the competition."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

20 Delicious Bug Recipes from Chefs

20 Delicious Bug Recipes from Chefs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bug appetit! Here's how Rick Bayless and Curtis Stone like their insects
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Environmentalists and foodies alike have been hailing bugs as the future of eco-friendly protein. That’s great news for chefs and bug scientists with a taste for insects, including Marcel Dicke, an ecological entomologist at Wageningen University in the Netherlands who gave a 2010 TED talk called “Why Not Eat Insects?” (His dish of choice: dragonfly larvae.)"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insects and sustainability are not crap.

Insects and sustainability are not crap. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In my first blog, “Animal welfare in insect farms”, I discussed why insect farming is more sustainable than livestock farming. On 17th of January 2015 an article “Are those edible bugs actually sus...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

‘Entopreneurs’ try to convince public to eat bugs

‘Entopreneurs’ try to convince public to eat bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
They hop. They crawl. They squirm. And they could be coming to a dinner plate near you.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Inside San Francisco's La Cocina, a commercial kitchen for food entrepreneurs, Monica Martinez empties hundreds of live mealworms, each about 2 inches long, into a plastic container. She uses chopsticks to pull out dead ones before pouring the squirming critters on a tray and sliding them into an oven."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Glasgow children would rather eat bugs from garden than greens - according to breakfast cereal firm

Glasgow children would rather eat bugs from garden than greens - according to breakfast cereal firm | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

WE'VE all resisted eating greens at one point or another in life, but apparently children in Glasgow will go even further and eat bugs.

According to a survey of city parents, 45 per cent have munched on creepy crawlies but 75 per cent refuse to eat a plate of greens.

Now the figures - about 100 parents in Glasgow taking part in a nation-wide online poll - also suggest that worms (19 per cent), caterpillars (11 per cent) and ants (10 per cent) were the most popular dining choices.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insects as food: Potential hazards and research needs

Insects as food: Potential hazards and research needs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The consumption of insects or eat bugs, is a common practice in some parts of the world (Africa, Asia, Latin America), where it may become part of the traditional food culture. To meet the challeng...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Entrepreneur bets the farm on high-protein powder made from insects

Entrepreneur bets the farm on high-protein powder made from insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Jiminy Cricket wouldn't approve, but a Stony Mountain entrepreneur is hoping a new protein powder made from crickets will help him save the family farm. Alex Drysdale, a 28-year-old entrepreneur, fitness buff and environmentalist, is launching a new online business later this month called Crik Nutrition.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

We Dare You to Eat These 8 Insect Recipes

We Dare You to Eat These 8 Insect Recipes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
For whatever reason, Americans are just not rushing to munch bugs. But maybe we should be. 

Which makes sense! As more and more people become hip to the health and environmental benefits of eating crunchy katydids, we've seen these little critters dipped in edible gold dust, ground up to make the world's next superfood, and featured on elaborate menus. But, for whatever reason, Americans are just not rushing to munch bugs like Timon and Pumbaa, even though Andrew Zimmern thinks we should be. Maybe these eight recipes will change your mind (but also maybe not at all).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Do Insects Feel Pain? Can Vegans Eat Insects? - YouTube

I was recently asked about my position on honey as a vegan and I promised I would cover it in a video. Before I can do that though, I have to explain my position on insects in general. Do bugs and other insects suffer? Should vegans be concerned with insect death?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Why Shailene Woodley Is Right And We Should All Be Eating Bugs

Why Shailene Woodley Is Right And We Should All Be Eating Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Shailene Woodley, you beautiful muscular wood sprite. She is such a hippie and we love her for it — which is why, when she recently disclosed to NYLON the strangest thing she’s ever eaten, we really weren’t all that surprised.

“I’ve eaten ants and that was great,” the 23-year-old “Divergent” star told NYLON Mag in a behind-the-scenes video during their April cover shoot “And June bugs, that was great. I think the future of food is in insects, so we’ll see what happens.”
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Upmarket bug snacks creeping into stores

Upmarket bug snacks creeping into stores | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Street vendors selling deep-fried insects as snacks are a familiar sight in Bangkok, but a Thai entrepreneur is trying to give edible bugs a more upmarket appeal.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insects for Athletes The Buzz on Bug Protein

Insects for Athletes The Buzz on Bug Protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
While most sports nutrition bloggers are debating the merits of 'grass fed' whey protein or evangelizing the latest hot product, a small corner of the internet has become infested with information on edible insects. And with the latest buzz of the 2015 U.S. dietary guidelines, (which call for a reduction in the amount of animal protein and an increase in healthful and environmentally friendly foods), athletes are looking for alternative protein sources. However, they are bombarded with warnings
more...
No comment yet.