Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Senzu Foods team sees big appetite for insect-based foods

Senzu Foods team sees big appetite for insect-based foods | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FIU students cook up palatable recipes incorporating insects as cheap and healthy forms of protein.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Here’s some food for thought: What if creepy crawlies were to become the next health-food craze?

Three Florida International University students want to make insects a staple of the American diet and have already whipped up some recipes that are mixed with bugs."

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Redefining Healthy Snacking!

Redefining Healthy Snacking! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
20 Case Studies in Growth and Innovation
Innovation in healthy snacking is at the dawn of a new era of opportunity. Consumers will consider anything as a snack, which is why snacking is now a part of every company’s strategy. And they are willing to be very experimental with flavours, ingredients, product formats and textures. New types of snack are growing fast, while also charging super-premium prices. Entrepreneurial start-ups are reinventing tired categories, from meat snacks to cakes.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The 20 Case Studies detail the strategies companies have adopted to succeed in snacking:

  • Ingredients
  • Nutrition profiles
  • Marketing messages
  • Product communications
  • Pricing strategies"
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Insect-based protein sources and their potential for human consumption: Nutritional composition and processin

Insect-based protein sources and their potential for human consumption: Nutritional composition and processin | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
  • Edible insects are, in general, rich in protein, fat, and energy and can be a significant source of vitamins and minerals.

  • Insects are a sustainable alternative protein source in food and feed.

  • Edible insects can contribute to food and feed security.

  • The development of safe rearing and effective processing methods are mandatory for a utilization of insects in food and feed.


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Tiny Farms: Edible insects are a novelty today, but they’ll be mainstream tomorrow

Tiny Farms: Edible insects are a novelty today, but they’ll be mainstream tomorrow | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Two or three years ago, you could count the number of US firms using cricket flour in food products on the fingers of one hand; today there are more than 30 companies making everything from bars to cookies. 
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Insect-based dishes on menu at St George's Market - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

Insect-based dishes on menu at St George's Market - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It might not be the most appealing snack for a weekend stroll round St George's Market - but we could all be indulging in these invertebrate treats in the future.
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It's The Next Generation Of Flour That's Made From Crickets

It's The Next Generation Of Flour That's Made From Crickets | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

SALT LAKE CITY, UT -- By the year 2050, this planet will be packed with 9 billion people, the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization predicts. The FAO is growing concerned with how we're going to feed those people and has commissioned a lot of studies on eating insects.

Before you let the "ick factor" take over, know this: 2 billion people worldwide already eat insects as their main source of protein. There are 1,900 species of edible insects, and the list is growing. It's best with something palatable, something that gets over the ick factor.

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Insects May Be the Taste of the Next Generation, Report Says

Insects May Be the Taste of the Next Generation, Report Says | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Can entomophagy, the eating of insects, help improve the world’s food resources?
Ana C. Day's insight:

Radio programme ..

 

A report from the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization says that insects offer a huge potential for improving the world’s food security. Peter Menzel, co-author of Man Eating Bugs, describes some insect-based cuisine and the western aversion to creepy-crawly snacks.

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Are You Ready For A Diet Of Insects?

Are You Ready For A Diet Of Insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Tyrades! By Danny Tyree When I was a six-year-old lad lusting over the "ant farm" advertisements in 12-cent comic books, I had no idea how ahead-of-their-time those ads were. According to the April...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"According to the April 10 “Newsweek,” entrepreneurs, restaurateurs and farmers are scrambling to cash in on using processed insects for food. Buoyed by a 2013 United Nations report and funding from the United States Department of Agriculture, they hope to reinvent Americans’ idea of desirable food sources and get a leg up (six legs up?) on the competition."

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Paying to see a bug on my food: how regulations and information can hamper radical innovations in the European Union.

Paying to see a bug on my food: how regulations and information can hamper radical innovations in the European Union. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Purpose

In this paper we examine the role of the European Novel Food Regulation (ENFR) on consumers’ acceptance of and willingness to pay (WTP) for radical food innovations. Our research question is focused on determining whether the ENFR is hampering the market potential of insect-based food products in the European Union. We position this question within the domain of regulatory barriers related to food innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a choice experiment, we assess the presence and relevance of these failures through the analysis of consumers’ acceptance and WTP for insect-based food products with different product attributes directly imposed by the ENFR. Namely, we assess the effect of the visualization of insects in the product, the use of logo, and nutritional information.

Findings

The results show that consumers prefer and are willing to pay a premium price for insect-based products with a nutritional health claim and logo, but they are not willing to pay for a product with a visualized insect. 

Originality/value

This paper highlights the risk of regulatory failures for novel foods in the European Union, such as insect-based food products due to the ENFR.

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Why is Insect Farming Slow to Industrialize? 

Why is Insect Farming Slow to Industrialize?  | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Ok, ok... if eating insects is so good for you and is being done in countries all over the world, why haven't we seen more progress in the industry? Why are crickets still more expensive than other forms of protein? 

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Dieters dropping carbs for feelgood protein foods

Dieters dropping carbs for feelgood protein foods | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
MORE people are rejecting carb and fat-heavy snacks in preference of protein “feelgood” foods, new research has shown.
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What is Entomophagy? - 4ento

What is Entomophagy? - 4ento | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With the world in search of alternative food sources, the word Entomophagy is starting to appear all over the web. So what is Entomophagy? Well, according to wikipedia Entomophagy is the human consumption of insects as food And in fact the word is derived from the Greek words for insects and to eat. However, is it as simple as that? A Broad Definition The broader definition ofEntomophagy actually includes arthropods that are not insects such as some arachnids (spiders) and also myriapods (centip
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AccelFoods Selects First Class of Food and Beverage Entrepreneurs for Its Accelerator Program | MRO

AccelFoods Selects First Class of Food and Beverage Entrepreneurs for Its Accelerator Program | MRO | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
AccelFoods, a national packaged food and beverage accelerator with a
dedicated investment fund, today announced that it has selected four
companies at the leading edge of food
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Exo. The brainchild of two former Brown University roommates,New York-based Exo makes all-natural protein bars with cricket flour, a revolutionary and sustainable insect-based protein source. http://exo.co/";

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Eating insects could help fight obesity, U.N. says

Eating insects could help fight obesity, U.N. says | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
* Many insects have as much protein as meat, study says
Ana C. Day's insight:

"As well as helping in the costly battle against obesity,
which the World Health Organisation estimates has nearly doubled
since 1980 and affects around 500 million people, the report
said insect farming was likely to be less land-dependent than
traditional livestock and produce fewer greenhouse gases.

It would also provide business and export opportunities for
poor people in developing countries, especially women, who are
often responsible for collecting insects in rural communities."

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