Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Would you eat insects for their nutritional value?

Would you eat insects for their nutritional value? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A bush-tucker trial is heading to Costessey, with visitors to this year’s Royal Norfolk Show being invited to take on the challenge.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Mealworms, grasshoppers and locusts will be among the moveable feast on offer to iron-bellied men, women and children who are prepared to taste the unexpected as part of the Harper Adams University Edible Bug Challenge."

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Edible insects in Afric An introduction to finding, using and eating insects.

Edible insects in Afric An introduction to finding, using and eating insects. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Summary: Edible insects are a common ingredient in traditional dishes in many parts of Africa, a continent with more than 250 potentially edible insect species. As the world’s population continues to grow, there is renewed interest in the use of insects as human food. Insects provide animal protein of good quality, and they are rich in lipids and macronutrients. The many edible insect species – an accessible and affordable source of ...
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Weak Oversight Is Holding Back Edible Insects

Weak Oversight Is Holding Back Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Industry leaders say they can’t ramp up their cricket powder sales because of vague regulations. A Florida native, Dr. Aaron T. Dossey is one of the main suppliers fueling a burgeoning insect boom. That powder, his latest product, was made for Exo, an insect protein bar company. His company, All Things Bugs, has also supplied cricket protein bar company Chapul, as well as Six Foods’s cricket chips.

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We'll All Eat Grasshoppers—Once We Know How to Raise Them | WIRED

We'll All Eat Grasshoppers—Once We Know How to Raise Them | WIRED | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

GO TO ANY market in Mexico and you’ll see piles of grasshoppers—dusted with chile powder, roasted with garlic, sprinkled with lime juice. I’ve eaten grasshoppers ground up in salsas and semi-pulverized in micheladas, their intact legs floating in the refreshing mix of beer, lime juice, and hot sauce. If you’ve ever been served chile-dusted orange slices along with a shot of mezcal—surprise! That chile powder was actually ground up grasshoppers.

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Insect-based dishes on menu at St George's Market - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

Insect-based dishes on menu at St George's Market - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It might not be the most appealing snack for a weekend stroll round St George's Market - but we could all be indulging in these invertebrate treats in the future.
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Sonoma Valley Sun | Entomophagy and ice cold beer « Turning Stones

Sonoma Valley Sun | Entomophagy and ice cold beer « Turning Stones | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
George McKale is a practicing archaeologist and Sonoma’s City Historian. He has excavated throughout California ranging from Native American sites thousands of years old to Gold Rush era locations. His passion and specialty in archaeology is the study of human remains.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Entomophagy and ice cold beer

Posted on February 19, 2014 by George McKale

I like bugs but I don’t like them crawling on me.  In fact, when I find an insect on any part of my body, I shiver to the core of my soul. Many cultures throughout the world use insects for food.  When animals eat insects they are called insectivores.  When humans eat them it is known as Entomophagy.

Today, insects are eaten in virtually every continent. Entomophagy, though still practiced, was very popular in the distant past. In fact, insects may have played an important role in the diet of early humans.  To get a better understanding of this line of research, one must take a closer look at poop.  Archaeologists have a nicer term; we refer to fossilized poop as coprolites.

Coprolites are often found in caves and a quick look under the microscope reveals all kinds of...."

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Eating Insects, France's Rising Trend

Eating Insects, France's Rising Trend | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
From Michelin chefs and Parisian bistro to home kitchen: in France eating insects is turning into an ecological issue, and becoming a rising trend.
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Bugs: Coming To A Supermarket Near You?

Bugs: Coming To A Supermarket Near You? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Crispy critters could soon be on supermarket shelves as a way to solve the world's food crisis.
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Assessment of Nutritional Quality and Anti-Nutrient Composition of Two Edible Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) - A Search for New Food Alternative

Assessment of Nutritional Quality and Anti-Nutrient Composition of Two Edible Grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) - A Search for New Food Alternative | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

See Art 59. 3-5

 

Mousumi Das Suman Kalyan Mandal


Via Jacques Mignon
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Jacques Mignon's curator insight, December 22, 2013 2:01 PM

Abstract : "Edible insects are a natural renewable resource of food that could solve the problem of food scarcity. The level of some nutrients and anti-nutrients of two grasshoppers were determined in order to ascertain their suitability as a food and feed source. Spathosternum prasiniferum prasiniferum contained the highest crude protein content of 65.15% while Chrotogonus trachypterus trachypterus had the lowest value of 59.63%. Crude fat and crude fibre content was highest in C. trachypterus trachypterus. Compared with the amino acid profile recommended by FAO/WHO, the grasshopper protein of studies species were of high quality due to its high content of essential amino acids. In fatty acid profile lenolenic acid was the most abundant followed by lenoleic acid. Moisture and energy contents were significantly higher in S. prasiniferum prasiniferum. A higher value of ash content was recorded in S. prasiniferum prasiniferum, corresponding to contain high proportions of sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus and magnesium and iron. S. prasiniferum prasiniferum gave higher value for Retinol, Thiamine, Riboflavin and Niacin. The anti-nutrients of the two studied species were generally low and far below the toxic level of human.Both the grasshoppers could serve as an alternative source of nutrient supplements in human diet."

 

Link : http://www.tjprc.org/download.php?fname=--1386077945-5.%20Assessment%20of%20nutritional.full.pdf

 

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By 2035, We’ll All Be Eating Grasshopper Tacos | TIME.com

By 2035, We’ll All Be Eating Grasshopper Tacos | TIME.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
And other expert predictions about the future of everything
Ana C. Day's insight:

"3. We’ll eat insects — happily.
High-protein, nutrient-rich, low-carb, low fat — were insects not, well, insects, they’d be a dieter’s dream. But within 20 years, said Josh Schonwald, author of The Taste of Tomorrow: Dispatches From the Future of Food, that perception of grossness — dominant in America — will start to change: “Edible insects are coming.” Already, there are grasshopper tacos in D.C., cicada sushi rolls in Connecticut, and toffee mealworms in San Francisco. And the Clinton Global Initiative just doled out $1 million to a group of students for an insect-farming project. Yum?"

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Anyone for cricket. . . or perhaps a locust? - Independent.ie

Anyone for cricket. . . or perhaps a locust? - Independent.ie | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Forget lab-grown burgers, the future of protein consumption lies in creepy, crawly, crunchy insects

Ana C. Day's insight:

"

The health food credentials are impressive. The report reads: "The composition of unsaturated omega-3 and six fatty acids in mealworms is comparable with that in fish and higher than in cattle and pigs.

The protein, vitamin and mineral content is similar to that in fish and meat. Many insects are rich in protein and good fats and high in calcium, iron and zinc."

It's why 1,900 species are eaten today in Africa, Asia and South America. They eat beetles (31pc of the world's population), caterpillars (18pc), bees, wasps and ants (14pc) crickets and grasshoppers and locusts (13pc)."

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Bugged by food shortages? Why insects could feed the world

Bugged by food shortages? Why insects could feed the world | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With the growing population, the need for alternative food sources to feed billions is dire. Industrial designer Katharina Unger believes she has a solution to the problem: She thinks you should all eat bugs.
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A Taste Of The Future Of Food

A Taste Of The Future Of Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Transcript CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST: Unless you've been hiding under a burger bun for the past week, you've probably heard the story about the lab
Ana C. Day's insight:

"HEADLEE: One of the other things that's just coming up recently is the idea of insects as food. And, in fact, you can actually do searches on the Internet and find restaurants that feature either ground-up insects or insects whole.

(LAUGHTER)

HEADLEE: Could we be seeing more and more insects creeping into our food?

GAYE: It's already quite popular in a few European countries, especially the Netherlands where they're, year on year, growing and selling many more insects. But also, there are countries like Australia where they've decided to call locusts flying prawns or flying shrimp, and they found that people eat them much more readily if they have a different name. But also, ground-up grasshoppers ground into bars such as muesli bars with fruits and nuts, using a cricket flower. People actua...."

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Crickets in Planet Organic, grasshoppers on the Wahaca menu: you might be eating insects sooner than you think

Crickets in Planet Organic, grasshoppers on the Wahaca menu: you might be eating insects sooner than you think | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects, long seen as a sustainable food of the future, have arrived in Britain, and you might be eating them sooner than you think
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The idea of insects as a sustainable food source has been seriously talked about for several years now. But blow me down with the flutter of a grasshopper’s wing if I didn’t walk in to Planet Organic recently and see packets of crickets, mealworms,  buffalo worms and grasshoppers for sale, right in between the bread aisle and the bananas."

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Crickets, grasshoppers, worms pushed as protein food of future

Crickets, grasshoppers, worms pushed as protein food of future | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eating insects as a movement to reduce the global environmental impact of food production gains momentum, and is getting taken to a younger crowd.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The movement to persuade Americans to reduce beef in their diet by eating bugs — "micro livestock" — is gaining momentum ahead of a global meat forum, as seen recently in a Denver Public Schools classroom."

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Edible Insects: The Next Protein Trend? | Vitacost.com Blog

Edible Insects: The Next Protein Trend? | Vitacost.com Blog | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Are you grossed out by the thought of chomping on crawly critters like caterpillars and crickets? Probably, but it turns out they’re a terrific source of
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Crickets, locusts, flies — yum? The case for edible insects

Crickets, locusts, flies — yum? The case for edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

If you found ants or a beetle on your dinner plate, chances are you’d either flip your plate over or calmly dump it in the trash. But what if bugs became a standard part of the human diet? With the growth of entomophagy, or the practice of eating insects, around the world, consumption of bugs may become common enough that you’ll welcome bugs in your breakfast.

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Hoxton’s pop-up answer to I’m A Celebrity will serve beetle larvae, meal worms, crickets and grasshoppers

Hoxton’s pop-up answer to I’m A Celebrity will serve beetle larvae, meal worms, crickets and grasshoppers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Beetle larvae, meal worms, crickets and grasshoppers are gracing the menu at Hoxton’s answer to the Bushtucker Trials next week.
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Here's Why You Should Start Eating (More) Bugs

Here's Why You Should Start Eating (More) Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Wait, just hear us out. Insects could be the next big thing in food....
Ana C. Day's insight:

"In 2012, we rediscovered kale and started nibbling on gluten-free everything. Then 2013 brought us Cronuts, the delicious pastry mashup. We've obsessed over Sriracha, pumpkin spice, seaweed -- but what will be the next big trend in food?

Bugs! It could be, anyway. Entomophagy, the practice of eating insects, is hailed by entomologists, or people who study them, as a healthy and eco-friendly food solution with a strong culinary tradition (in some cultures). A few high-end restaurants have already put them on the menu. The Michelin-starred Aphrodite restaurant in France, for example, serves up mealworms and crickets with foie gras. British chef Peter Gorton created a menu with entomologist Peter Smithers to feature bugs in every dish.

David Faure, who runs Aphrodite, told Bloomberg the idea to cook with bugs was a product of his world travels. "It’s really a question of taste," the chef said.

And indeed, it's no secret that people generally associate bugs with..."

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Philly makes room at the table: Edible insects and grasshopper tacos — NewsWorks

Philly makes room at the table: Edible insects and grasshopper tacos — NewsWorks | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects — which are part of the traditional diet of an estimated two billion people around the world according to the United Nations — are creeping into mainstream American cuisine and
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Creepy Tarantula Doesn't 'Bug Chef'

The world famous "Bug Chef" cooked up some tasty cuisine at Archie McPhee and SeattleInsider was there as tarantula, crickets, grasshoppers and scorpions were crunched up by guests.
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Creepy-crawly cuisine on the menu at Central Park's 'Hunt, Gather and Cook Insects' program - News

Creepy-crawly cuisine on the menu at Central Park's 'Hunt, Gather and Cook Insects' program - News | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
"Why do you eat bugs?" 5-year-old Alan Diller sensibly asked his grandmother as they stood Saturday ankle-deep in Lancaster County Central Park's Mill Creek."Because there's so many of them and they're good for you," replied Sandy Terhune of...
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A Taste Of The Future Of Food

Transcript CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST: Unless you've been hiding under a burger bun for the past week, you've probably heard the story about the lab
Ana C. Day's insight:

"

HEADLEE: One of the other things that's just coming up recently is the idea of insects as food. And, in fact, you can actually do searches on the Internet and find restaurants that feature either ground-up insects or insects whole.

(LAUGHTER)

HEADLEE: Could we be seeing more and more insects creeping into our food?

GAYE: It's already quite popular in a few European countries, especially the Netherlands where they're, year on year, growing and selling many more insects. But also, there are countries like Australia where they've decided to call locusts flying prawns or flying shrimp, and they found that people eat them much more readily if they have a different name. But also, ground-up grasshoppers ground into bars such as muesli bars with fruits and nuts, using a cricket flower. People actually don't know it's insects at all.

So, I think when we grind them up and we make insect patties - mixed with vegetables and onions - people don't really know any different.

HEADLEE: Have you eaten them?

GAYE: I have eaten them. Actually pretty good and they all taste quite differently; some are quite cheesy, others are a bit like lemon, and some are sort of nutty. And I think that's it really is just about the way we're socialized around animals and insects where we think, ew, creepy crawlies or bugs or they're dirty. But the way in which they're bred is actually incredibly hygienic. They love to be bred in captivity in small spaces."

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One man’s meat, another man’s poison - Nation | The Star Online

One man’s meat, another man’s poison - Nation | The Star Online | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

INSECTS, spiders and bugs are not halal and cannot be consumed by Muslims.

Ana C. Day's insight:

“You are obliged to eat food that is halal and good. There are good things that you can eat and there are bad things that you should avoid.

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