Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Entomophagy in our world | Charles Spence | TEDxCityUniversityLondon - YouTube

Professor Spence pinpoints that with the issue of global obesity crisis only getting worse the unorthodox solution may be moving towards widespread enthomoph...
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Published on May 5, 2015

Professor Spence pinpoints that with the issue of global obesity crisis only getting worse the unorthodox solution may be moving towards widespread enthomophagy. Maybe, it works for lowering salt in foods or perhaps using neurograstronomy, focusing on pleasurable aspects. Charles addresses all these questions above in his great interactive speech.

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Regulating edible insects: the challenge of addressing food security, nature conservation, and the erosion of traditional food culture

Regulating edible insects: the challenge of addressing food security, nature conservation, and the erosion of traditional food culture | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it


"Abstract

Entomophagy is a common practice in many regions of the world but there are few examples of national regulations that govern insects for human consumption.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Where entomophagy is not common, the current regulatory discourse focuses primarily on food safety and consumer protection. In countries where insects contribute to local diets, nature conservation is often an issue of high importance. This paper investigates the variation in the ways in which entomophagy and its related activities are currently regulated in Thailand, Switzerland, Kenya and Canada. Authoritative bodies who are responsible and the roles they play are discussed. Insects have only recently entered into the sustainable food dialogue, but have not yet been incorporated into policy documents and have been largely omitted from regulatory frameworks. Moreover, even in nations where there is a tradition of consuming a variety of insect species, they do not appear explicitly in dietary guidelines. Although food safety is a major concern, it can undermine the importance of nature conservation, traditional food culture, food security, and potential economic development. Thus, entomophagy should be viewed holistically and development of future legislation must take into consideration its multi-dimensional nature."

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The Future of Cricket Farming and the REAL Value of Crickets as told by Next Millennium Farms

The Future of Cricket Farming and the REAL Value of Crickets as told by Next Millennium Farms | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Earlier this week, we heard Jarrod’s views on how cricket farming might help with the California water crisis .  Crickets are clearly a more sustainable protein resource than things like red meat...
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The Environmental Benefits Of Eating Crickets Vs. Chicken: It’s Complicated

The Environmental Benefits Of Eating Crickets Vs. Chicken: It’s Complicated | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
There’s no such thing as a free lunch
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Nathan Allen from Aspire, which is launching a cricket farm in Texas, points out that the study didn’t compare other major differences between cricket farming and chicken farming, including…."


"Kevin Bachhuber from Big Cricket Farms in Youngstown, Ohio, says the study also looked at food that isn’t actually fed to farmed crickets. “Crickets fed on unprocessed straw and chicken shit are….."


"And according Pat Crowley, a hydrologist and the co-founder of Chapul, a cricket protein bar company: “I would say that the largest take home from this study is that there is indeed a dearth of data on the feed conversion ratios, with much of…."


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Crickets in Planet Organic, grasshoppers on the Wahaca menu: you might be eating insects sooner than you think

Crickets in Planet Organic, grasshoppers on the Wahaca menu: you might be eating insects sooner than you think | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Edible insects, long seen as a sustainable food of the future, have arrived in Britain, and you might be eating them sooner than you think
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The idea of insects as a sustainable food source has been seriously talked about for several years now. But blow me down with the flutter of a grasshopper’s wing if I didn’t walk in to Planet Organic recently and see packets of crickets, mealworms,  buffalo worms and grasshoppers for sale, right in between the bread aisle and the bananas."

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Are insects the food of the future? How we will all be snacking on worm tarts & ..

Are insects the food of the future? How we will all be snacking on worm tarts & .. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In tonight's final episode of BBC Two's Back In Time For Dinner, the Robshaw family who have travelled from the 1950s to the end of the millennium are served the food of the future.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"For most of us the thought of eating insects might prove to be one culinary step too far.

But the consumption of locusts, crickets, worms and grubs could become very much a part of our diet as the cost of meat production rises, and the demand for meat grows."

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Trend Watch: The Future Of Food | TimesCity

Trend Watch: The Future Of Food | TimesCity | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insect eating, scientifically termed as Entomophagy, is an age-old tradition. And even today, many cultures still practise it. Read on to know more about this food trend.
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Humans Are Ready For Protein-Rich Crickets, But Are Crickets Ready For Us?

Humans Are Ready For Protein-Rich Crickets, But Are Crickets Ready For Us? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The cricket may be a dietary staple in many parts of the world, but that doesn't mean it will provide an efficient, large-scale alternate source of protein, as advocates claim. New research shows that crickets need to consume quality feed in order to be consumable themselves.
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‘Entopreneurs’ try to convince public to eat bugs

‘Entopreneurs’ try to convince public to eat bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
They hop. They crawl. They squirm. And they could be coming to a dinner plate near you.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Inside San Francisco's La Cocina, a commercial kitchen for food entrepreneurs, Monica Martinez empties hundreds of live mealworms, each about 2 inches long, into a plastic container. She uses chopsticks to pull out dead ones before pouring the squirming critters on a tray and sliding them into an oven."

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94 Are Edible Insects the Future of Food For Yoga Freaks - YouTube

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Bay Area 'Entopreneurs' Feed Growing Appetite For Edible Insects

Bay Area 'Entopreneurs' Feed Growing Appetite For Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
They hop. They crawl. They squirm. And they could be coming to a dinner plate near you.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"An increasing number of “entopreneurs” are launching businesses to feed a growing appetite for crickets, mealworms and other edible insects.

These upstarts are trying to persuade more Americans to eat bugs, which can be produced with less land, food and water than other sources of animal protein."

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The Rise Of The Incredible Edible Insect

The Rise Of The Incredible Edible Insect | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Start-ups are marketing an unlikely new protein. It’s nutrient-rich, all natural, and six-legged.
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Top 10 Tasty Edible Insects

Top 10 Tasty Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
As any Entomophage (eater of insects) would tell you, these ten bugs are not just pests… they’re good for eating at dinner! In many cases people started eating these insects out of necessity, but these days they’ve become a delicacy. Read on to discover these top ten delicious and tasty insects that you will not be able to resist.
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Bugs may solve food sustainability problems

Bugs may solve food sustainability problems | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
While many people search for a solution to a pestering insect problem, Kenzie Wade, junior in anthropology, looks at insects as the solution to a more complex problem. Wade said she saw the crawling creatures as exciting opportunities. She said she hoped to transform her bug-eating school project into a growing business.

“I would like to bring food sustainability to cultural preservation,” Wade said.

According to Wade, she had to choose a topic and write a blog from her environmental anthropology class. Wade used the assignment to pursue her interest in food sustainability by eating insects, or entomophagy.
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Need protein? Try a cricket

Need protein? Try a cricket | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
If you’re wanting to add some extra crunch and protein to your next meal, bugs are the way to go.
Although not a new phenomenon, insect consumption has become more popular due to an increased demand for new animal proteins and is a field being seriously pursued by biotech entrepreneurs.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"If eating an insect raw doesn’t sound appealing to you, never fear. There are recipes for bug brownies, cookies, pancakes, protein bars and a variety of other dishes depending on how you want your protein served."

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Eating Crickets - Why you will end up eating bugs, now or later (and where to do it now).

Eating Crickets - Why you will end up eating bugs, now or later (and where to do it now). | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Why you will end up eating bugs, now or later (and where to do it now)
Ana C. Day's insight:

"According to the FDA, the reason a certain amount of insects are allowed in commercial food is that it’s “economically impractical to grow, harvest or process raw products that are totally free of non-hazardous, naturally occurring, unavoidable defects.”  

Granted, many foods contain far fewer insect parts than what is legally allowed. Still, it’s all but guaranteed you’re eating bugs."

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Would you eat insects for their nutritional value?

Would you eat insects for their nutritional value? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A bush-tucker trial is heading to Costessey, with visitors to this year’s Royal Norfolk Show being invited to take on the challenge.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Mealworms, grasshoppers and locusts will be among the moveable feast on offer to iron-bellied men, women and children who are prepared to taste the unexpected as part of the Harper Adams University Edible Bug Challenge."

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20 Delicious Bug Recipes from Chefs

20 Delicious Bug Recipes from Chefs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bug appetit! Here's how Rick Bayless and Curtis Stone like their insects
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Environmentalists and foodies alike have been hailing bugs as the future of eco-friendly protein. That’s great news for chefs and bug scientists with a taste for insects, including Marcel Dicke, an ecological entomologist at Wageningen University in the Netherlands who gave a 2010 TED talk called “Why Not Eat Insects?” (His dish of choice: dragonfly larvae.)"

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The Cricket and the Cow // Pint of Science Australia

The Cricket and the Cow // Pint of Science Australia | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Eating insects instead of beef would feed the world in a millionth of the space and allow nature to recover from thousands of years of cattle grazing.  Grassland replacement would restore endangered habitats and species.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"In conjunction with Pint of Science, SE-QLD Australian Science Communicators and the Edible Bug Shop, we present an evening of entertainment as we look at the science of Entomophagy."

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▶ EATING BUGS! Edible Insects with Little Herds, Austin Nonprofit - YouTube

https://youtu.be/E-Lj5df3d4A
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Can insects go from pests to popular snack foods?

Can insects go from pests to popular snack foods? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Several U.S. companies aim to eliminate the yuck factor and get people to eat protein-rich bugs.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"An increasing number of “entopreneurs” are launching businesses to feed a growing appetite for crickets, mealworms and other edible insects. (“Ento” comes from the Greek word for insect.) 

These upstarts are trying to persuade more Americans to eat bugs, which can be produced with less land, food and water than other sources of animal protein."

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Growing appetite for edible insects, eco-friendly protein

Growing appetite for edible insects, eco-friendly protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
An increasing number of "entopreneurs" are launching businesses to feed a growing appetite for crickets, mealworms and other edible insects.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"“Insects are viewed as what ruins food – a roach in your soup, a fly in your salad. That’s the biggest obstacle – the ick factor,” said Daniella Martin, an author of a book on eating insects and the “Girl Meets Bug” blogger, referring to the feeling of distaste some consumers might feel."

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San Francisco kitchen crawl could get you protein boost with edible insects | Toronto Star

San Francisco kitchen crawl could get you protein boost with edible insects | Toronto Star | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
While eating bugs are a tough sell for Westerners, the United Nations has been promoting edible insects as a way to improve nutrition and reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Across San Francisco Bay inside at a kitchen in Berkeley, Megan Miller and her assistants shape clumps of orange-ginger cookie dough, carefully arrange them up on a tray and slip them in an oven. The key ingredient: flour made from ground-up crickets.

Miller’s startup, Bitty Foods, sells its cricket-based cookies and baked goods online and at upscale grocery stores. Many of its customers are moms looking for a healthy snack for their kids."

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Growing appetite for edible insects a tough sell in U.S.

Growing appetite for edible insects a tough sell in U.S. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Upstarts trying to persuade more Americans to eat bugs, which can be produced with fewer resources than other sources of animal protein
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The United Nations has been promoting edible insects as a way to improve nutrition, reduce greenhouse-gas emissions and create jobs in insect production. The U.N.'s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has said that grasshoppers, ants and other members of the insect world are an underutilized food for people, livestock and pets. At least 2 billion people worldwide already eat insects as part of their diet, according to the 2013 FAO report."

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Panel to discuss insects as a human food source | Penn State University

Panel to discuss insects as a human food source | Penn State University | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A panel of experts will discuss the use of edible insects to attain greater global food security, from noon to 1:30 p.m. April 21, in Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library on the University Park campus of Penn State. “Creepy, Crawly, Crunchy: Can Insects Feed the Future?” will focus on insects as a nontraditional livestock, potential barriers to insect rearing and insect eating, or entomophagy, in the developed and developing world. The program is free and open to the public and also will be available for viewing live online.
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