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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Edible Insects: The Next Protein Trend? | Vitacost.com Blog

Edible Insects: The Next Protein Trend? | Vitacost.com Blog | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Are you grossed out by the thought of chomping on crawly critters like caterpillars and crickets? Probably, but it turns out they’re a terrific source of
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Bug bonanza: It’s time for Westerners to reimagine protein

Bug bonanza: It’s time for Westerners to reimagine protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In the Gospels, John the Baptist, who wore itchy camel hair clothes under the hot sun of the Middle East, subsisted on a diet of wild locusts and honey. Today Jesus’ gastronomically adventurous cousin would be just another foot soldier in a food revolution to reclaim 10 quintillion tiny creatures for the dinner table. It’s all part of a movement to break the taboo that Westerners have against eating the world’s most plentiful source of protein — insects. Across the United States, high-end restaurants and even some that cater to a more downscale clientele have begun to experiment with menus that feature such fare as wax moth larvae tacos and meal worms sprinkled over conventional food like ice cream. Supermarkets have begun selling crickets that can be fried and served as gourmet
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Bug eaters, entrepreneurs unite at Future Food Salon on Feb. 19

Bug eaters, entrepreneurs unite at Future Food Salon on Feb. 19 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Austin is the third city to host Alimentary Initiatives' Future Food Salon, an event in partnership with local nonprofit Little Herds.
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Insect cusisine a new trend in eating

Insect cusisine a new trend in eating | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
NEVER mind that bug in your soup. It's meant to be there. An Abbotsford restaurant is among a string of city eateries driving a new wave in insect cuisine.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Scorpions, silk worms, ants and even cockroaches are among the invertebrates served up as part of a trend driven by young foodies.

David Chen, owner of Japanese diner, Shizuku, said he decided to introduce bugs after sampling dishes during trips around Asia.

But he said it wasn't for everybody.

"We are trying our insect dishes with regular customers who we know well and know are willing to try something different.''

Crickets and mealworms cooked in soy sauce and butter so far topped the list."

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David George Gordon Receives New York Times Nod for His Eat-A-Bug Cookbook

David George Gordon Receives New York Times Nod for His Eat-A-Bug Cookbook | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Seattle, Washington (PRWEB) January 17, 2014 -- David George Gordon, author of the revised and updated edition of Eat-A-Bug Cookbook gets a nod to his book by the New York Times.
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Bioeconomy is the way to go - Nation | The Star Online

Bioeconomy is the way to go - Nation | The Star Online | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Biotechnology has the potential to cut across various industries and transform Malaysia into a high income nation, with an inclusive and sustainable economy.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"FANCY having a bug-patty burger for a meal? It might sound gross, but bugs and creepy crawlies may be the ultimate solution to reducing world hunger."

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Catching the bug for entrepreneurship - San Francisco Business Times

Catching the bug for entrepreneurship - San Francisco Business Times | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A new food product may soon be flying — or at least hopping — off Bay Area grocery...
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Catching the bug for entrepreneurship - San Francisco Business Times

Catching the bug for entrepreneurship - San Francisco Business Times | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A new food product may soon be flying — or at least hopping — off Bay Area grocery...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"

Heylin is making them by hand in a commissary kitchen. In the meantime, he is seeking investors to raise capital for production equipment and a 20,000-square-foot farm in the East Bay where he can raise organically fed crickets. Ideally, the company would churn out approximately 20 million crickets a week.

Crickets can be raised in controlled indoor environments and only take six to eight weeks to reach maturity. Production is cheaper and less susceptible to climate change than other forms of protein."

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Recent Unknown node types | eyebeam.org

Recent Unknown node types | eyebeam.org | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ana C. Day's insight:

The attendance figures for these events are truly staggering, according to Dunkel. As many as 50,000 people attended last year's entomophagy events at the L'Insectarium de Montréal. Around 10,000 insect epicures flock to the annual Big Bug Bake-off, part of Purdue University's annual Bug Bowl in April. Other events at Iowa State University, New Orleans' Audubon Zoo, and the North Carolina State Museum of Natural History in Raleigh attract equally enthusiastic if somewhat smaller crowds.

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How much insect fragments do we eat?

How much insect fragments do we eat? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eating a bug might not be just a part of the Truth or Dare game anymore - not if people in the United States and other western countries take a new United Nations report to heart.
Ana C. Day's insight:
60 The number of "insect fragments" the FDA allows per 100 grams of chocolate, which equates to a little more than two Hershey's bars.30 The number of insect fragments allowed in 100 grams - about 6 tablespoons - of peanut butter.5 The number of fly eggs allowed per 250 milliliters - a little over 1 cup - of orange juice.28 grams The amount of protein in 100 grams of caterpillar, or in one chicken breast. (For comparison, 100 grams is about 10 gummy worms.)2 billion The number of people around the world who include insects in their diet, according to the U.N. report.
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The future of protein

The future of protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
We come from a long line of bug eaters. Our earliest primate ancestors were insectivores, and our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees, make rudimentary tools to fish termites out of narrow tunnels in their mounds.
Ana C. Day's insight:

ENJOY THE READING !!!!!

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Beautiful bug biscuits to tempt the squeamish - environment - 23 April 2013 - New Scientist

Beautiful bug biscuits to tempt the squeamish - environment - 23 April 2013 - New Scientist | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
You may not eat insects now, but if they looked as attractive as they are nutritious, would you join the 80 per cent of the world's population that does?
Ana C. Day's insight:

This is a cookie-making machine with a difference. Designer Susana Soaresand a team of food scientists and engineers have designed a 3D printer that makes biscuits from insect flour.

 

Just follow the recipe: grind up bugs and mix with icing butter, cream cheese or water to form the right consistency to go through the 3D printer's nozzle. Choose your favourite biscuit design and print out your snack: an exquisite morsel ready for cooking.

The installation asks whether by turning edible insects into intriguing forms, we could overcome the typical Western aversion to snacking on creepy-crawlies. Elsewhere, insects are on the menu for an estimated 80 per cent of the world's population, for the good reason that they have high nutritional value. Down just four grasshoppers and you'll get as much calcium as a glass of milk; by weight, dung beetles contain more protein than beef.

Watch the tabletop printer at work at the Insects Au Gratin exhibition and workshops, running until 5 May at the Wellcome Collection in London.

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Chefs from world-renowned restaurant cook cockroach - Sowetan LIVE

Chefs from world-renowned restaurant cook cockroach - Sowetan LIVE | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In their latest attempt to convince squeamish Western palates that insects are edible food sources, Danish chefs from a culinary
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Scientists have long been touting insects as a protein-packed meat alternative that could help meet the world’s growing food demand.

While the practice of eating insects, or entomophagy, may be unsettling for Western palates, the UN says that different species of beetles, ants, bees, grasshoppers and crickets are eaten in 29 countries across Asia, 23 countries in the Americas, and 36 countries in Africa.

In Thailand alone, 200 different insect species are consumed and are commonly sold as street snacks throughout the country.

According to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, some insects contain twice the protein of raw meat and fish, while others, particularly in their larval stage, are also rich in fat, vitamins and minerals"

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Is Bug Eating The World's Last Great Hope? | RECIPE CORNER

Is Bug Eating The World's Last Great Hope? | RECIPE CORNER | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Daniella Martin opens up to RC about her world-wide journey into eating and cooking with creepy crawlers and her new book,
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The Day - YUCK! Bug-eaters chow down at Pequot Museum exhibit
| News from southeastern Connecticut

The Day - YUCK! Bug-eaters chow down at Pequot Museum exhibit<br/> | News from southeastern Connecticut | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ana C. Day's insight:

"David Gracer knows it seems gross.

He is well aware, he told his audience Saturday at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum, that it goes against everything we've been taught.

But the community college teacher from Providence reassured them: Entomophagy - the art of eating bugs - is not quite as strange as one would think.

Gracer began his presentation - part of the grand opening of the Mashantucket Pequot Museum's "Backyard Monsters: The World of Insects" exhibit - by asking if anyone in the room had ever consumed a bug.

"Were you riding a bike at the time, or was it deliberate?" he added."

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Future High-Protein Diet Is the Six-Legged Kind | Industry Market Trends

Future High-Protein Diet Is the Six-Legged Kind | Industry Market Trends | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Plus: Future High-Protein Diet Is the Six-Legged Kind, Top 10 STEM Jokes, and You Might Be an Engineer If...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"While eating insects is shunned by western cultures, bugs are a primary source of high-nutrition food — if not a delicacy — in many parts of the world. As industrial designer Susan Soares notes, our hesitance has as much to do with their aesthetics as cultural background. But what if they were turned into yummy shapes like, say, cakes?

Thanks to ever-widening applications and possibilities enabled by 3D printing, food scientists and Soares are exploring 3D printed food with insects as the main ingredient at London South Bank University...."

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Austin Bug Eating Soiree February 19: Munch on Insects to Sustain the Planet

Austin Bug Eating Soiree February 19:  Munch on Insects to Sustain the Planet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
YUM! Bug eating soiree in Austin aims to raise entomophagy awareness. Crickets are good for you! Continue reading →
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Creepy Tarantula Doesn't 'Bug Chef'

The world famous "Bug Chef" cooked up some tasty cuisine at Archie McPhee and SeattleInsider was there as tarantula, crickets, grasshoppers and scorpions were crunched up by guests.
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Is Protein-Rich Bug Flour the Solution to World Hunger?

Is Protein-Rich Bug Flour the Solution to World Hunger? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In September, a team of McGill University MBA students won the $1 million Hult Prize at the Clinton Global Initiative’s annual meeting.
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Anyone for cricket. . . or perhaps a locust? - Independent.ie

Anyone for cricket. . . or perhaps a locust? - Independent.ie | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Forget lab-grown burgers, the future of protein consumption lies in creepy, crawly, crunchy insects

Ana C. Day's insight:

"

The health food credentials are impressive. The report reads: "The composition of unsaturated omega-3 and six fatty acids in mealworms is comparable with that in fish and higher than in cattle and pigs.

The protein, vitamin and mineral content is similar to that in fish and meat. Many insects are rich in protein and good fats and high in calcium, iron and zinc."

It's why 1,900 species are eaten today in Africa, Asia and South America. They eat beetles (31pc of the world's population), caterpillars (18pc), bees, wasps and ants (14pc) crickets and grasshoppers and locusts (13pc)."

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Fancy a meal of insects, anybody? - Nation | The Star Online

Fancy a meal of insects, anybody? - Nation | The Star Online | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

CRUNCHY bursts of nutty flavours filled with nutritious goodness – that’s basically what you get from a meal of insects, or so they say.

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Land of the locust eaters | Bangkok Post: lifestyle

Land of the locust eaters | Bangkok Post: lifestyle | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In depth coverage of lifestyle, music, food, fashion, arts and culture from Thailand and Asean coupled with reviews, features and directories of Thailand restaurants, bars, cuisine and wine.
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How eating insects could solve world hunger - Features - Scotsman.com

How eating insects could solve world hunger - Features - Scotsman.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When the United Nations announced that we could all fight world hunger by eating more insects, most Scots probably turned green at the thought.
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Afton Halloran on Edible Insects : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

Afton Halloran on Edible Insects : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
This episode: UN FAO Consultant and Edible Bug Nerd Afton Halloran in conversation about the prospects for Entomophagy (that's the fancy name for eatin' bugs)...
Ana C. Day's insight:

Great radio program to listen to ....

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Cicadas set to descend on East Coast can be tasty dishes when well-prepared

Cicadas set to descend on East Coast can be tasty dishes when well-prepared | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The stick-legged, buzzing and bug-eyed insects are coming — but you can do your part to exterminate cicadas: eat ‘em!
Billions of Brood II cicadas are set to hatch this spring, bringing a once every 17 years plague to most of the East Coast.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Shrimp and lobster eat garbage and they are the insects of the ocean,’ says cicada cook Jenna Jadin. ‘If we eat those without much afterthought, why not eat insects?’

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/cicada-cooking-pizza-tacos-jello-article-1.1314334#ixzz2QWuvOuHy";

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