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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Of course we don't want to eat bugs. But can we afford not to?

Of course we don't want to eat bugs. But can we afford not to? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The idea of eating insects disgusts us. But meat is growing ever more expensive. Enter the marketing department…
Ana C. Day's insight:

The key to making this work will be one of the oldest and darkest of arts: marketing. These burgers won't declare themselves to be made with BugULike™ or Insectelicious™; the contents will list an ingredient called something like NaturesBounty™.

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Replacing lemur meat with insect protein in Madagascar

Replacing lemur meat with insect protein in Madagascar | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Poaching is a major threat to endangered lemurs in some parts of Madagascar, but a group has come up with an innovative solution to the problem: replace lemur meat with silkworm pupae, a byproduct of silk production..
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CNN The case for eating insects

CNN The case for eating insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In the next 40 years, the world is going to need a 70 percent increase in food production to feed a population that will be billions larger and considerably wealthier than it is today. Where is that food going to come from?
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Insects are a particularly efficient crop. The same amount of feed can produce 9 times as much locust food as beef, Dicke said. That will come in handy because the world won’t only have more mouths to feed; those mouths will belong to people who are more affluent, and typically will eat more and demand more meat. The potential for the growth of livestock production is very limited, Dicke said."

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