Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
140.0K views | +38 today
Follow
Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Eating Bugs with Anna Faris, Tituss Burgess & Chef David George Gordon - YouTube

Chef David George Gordon, who prepares gourmet dishes with bugs as protein, has James, Anna and Tituss try ants, cockroaches and a deep fried tarantula. Subs...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Are insects the food of the future? How we will all be snacking on worm tarts & ..

Are insects the food of the future? How we will all be snacking on worm tarts & .. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In tonight's final episode of BBC Two's Back In Time For Dinner, the Robshaw family who have travelled from the 1950s to the end of the millennium are served the food of the future.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"For most of us the thought of eating insects might prove to be one culinary step too far.

But the consumption of locusts, crickets, worms and grubs could become very much a part of our diet as the cost of meat production rises, and the demand for meat grows."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Bugs for Dinner: Big Cricket Farms Find Niche in Edible Insect Farming

Bugs for Dinner:  Big Cricket Farms Find Niche in Edible Insect Farming | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Rich in protein and requiring relatively few resources to raise, the United Nations says insects should be on our plates.Though bugs make up part of a healthy, diverse diet in many non-Western cultures, Americans and Europeans generally consider eating insects to be disgusting, even ‘primitive.’ But a growing movement by edible insect enthusiasts like Kevin Bachhuber is looking to change this perception.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Eat Crickets, Save World

Eat Crickets, Save World | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ucsb Bren School Students’ ‘Slightly Nutty’ Project Makes Insect Cuisine More Sustainable.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"After an initial test of black soldier fly larvae, the team switched to crickets, which had emerged in 2010 as an insect protein of choice because of the plentiful pet store infrastructure that existed for feeding pet lizards and frogs. Better yet, the nutritional and sustainability impacts are staggering: cricket flour offers at least twice as much protein as beef, more iron than spinach, and as much B12 as salmon, yet you can grow six times as much of it than beef with the same amount of feed."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

The Rise Of The Incredible Edible Insect

The Rise Of The Incredible Edible Insect | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Start-ups are marketing an unlikely new protein. It’s nutrient-rich, all natural, and six-legged.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Manitoba entrepreneur to launch world’s first cricket protein powder | MyToba.ca

Manitoba entrepreneur to launch world’s first cricket protein powder | MyToba.ca | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Crik protein powder’s main ingredient is crickets – yes, that’s correct, crickets. This clean and environmentally-friendly protein supplement is a 100 per cent Canadian-made product, and Drysdale hopes the launch of his brand and product line will bring something innovative to both the fitness and business world.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Entrepreneur bets the farm on high-protein powder made from insects

Entrepreneur bets the farm on high-protein powder made from insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Jiminy Cricket wouldn't approve, but a Stony Mountain entrepreneur is hoping a new protein powder made from crickets will help him save the family farm. Alex Drysdale, a 28-year-old entrepreneur, fitness buff and environmentalist, is launching a new online business later this month called Crik Nutrition.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Jungle Bars are boosted with powdered cricket protein

Jungle Bars are boosted with powdered cricket protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
"Our mission is to change peoples' opinion towards edible insects by offering them a normal looking protein bar that tastes good," said product design graduate Búi Bjarmar Aðalsteinsson, who is leading the project.

According to the designer, crickets contain a high protein content, as well as minerals like iron and calcium.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insect-based protein sources and their potential for human consumption: Nutritional composition and processin

Insect-based protein sources and their potential for human consumption: Nutritional composition and processin | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
  • Edible insects are, in general, rich in protein, fat, and energy and can be a significant source of vitamins and minerals.

  • Insects are a sustainable alternative protein source in food and feed.

  • Edible insects can contribute to food and feed security.

  • The development of safe rearing and effective processing methods are mandatory for a utilization of insects in food and feed.


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Cricket Milkshakes Take Protein Shakes to a Bugged-out Level - Los Angeles Magazine

Cricket Milkshakes Take Protein Shakes to a Bugged-out Level - Los Angeles Magazine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Wayback Burgers will start serving the vanilla shakes with chocolate syrup and cricket powder on April 1
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Cricket flour is high in protein - Victoria Advocate

Cricket flour is high in protein - Victoria Advocate | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

I recently came across cricket flour, touted as a high protein flour, and I was wondering if you are familiar with this and if you could share your insight into this product. Also, are crickets kosher and would you suggest purchasing organic cricket flour?

Did you know the consumption of insects as food is known as entomophagy? 

Now, a bit of cricket history: Crickets have long been the symbol of good luck in many cultures, including the Chinese culture.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

A bug's life: Protein bar made out of crickets launches crowdfunding campaign

A bug's life: Protein bar made out of crickets launches crowdfunding campaign | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A Kickstarter campaign aims to fund a health-conscious protein bar made out of cricket powder.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insects for Athletes The Buzz on Bug Protein

Insects for Athletes The Buzz on Bug Protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
While most sports nutrition bloggers are debating the merits of 'grass fed' whey protein or evangelizing the latest hot product, a small corner of the internet has become infested with information on edible insects. And with the latest buzz of the 2015 U.S. dietary guidelines, (which call for a reduction in the amount of animal protein and an increase in healthful and environmentally friendly foods), athletes are looking for alternative protein sources. However, they are bombarded with warnings
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Senzu Foods team sees big appetite for insect-based foods

Senzu Foods team sees big appetite for insect-based foods | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FIU students cook up palatable recipes incorporating insects as cheap and healthy forms of protein.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Here’s some food for thought: What if creepy crawlies were to become the next health-food craze?

Three Florida International University students want to make insects a staple of the American diet and have already whipped up some recipes that are mixed with bugs."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Edible insects: Would you eat a protein bar made of crickets?

Edible insects: Would you eat a protein bar made of crickets? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Ant and Dec have a lot to answer for. The television presenters are unwittingly helping to block one of the most logical and healthy solutions to an impending European protein shortage; edible insects.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"The projections are stark. Livestock farming is becoming unsustainable. Soya, the main protein source in animal feed, costs up to £1,000 a ton and it takes 25kg of soya to rear 1kg of beef. Domestically we only produce 2 per cent of the soya we need."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Crickets Are Not a Free Lunch, Protein Conversion Rates May Be Overestimated

Crickets Are Not a Free Lunch, Protein Conversion Rates May Be Overestimated | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Some practitioners of entomophagy believe that raising insects for consumption by humans will help solve world hunger problems. Crickets and other insects, they say, are able to convert plant matte...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"“Everyone assumes that crickets — and other insects — are the food of the future given their high feed conversion relative to livestock,” Dr. Parrella said. “However, there is very little data to support this, and this article shows the story is far more complex.”"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Bay Area 'Entopreneurs' Feed Growing Appetite For Edible Insects

Bay Area 'Entopreneurs' Feed Growing Appetite For Edible Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
They hop. They crawl. They squirm. And they could be coming to a dinner plate near you.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"An increasing number of “entopreneurs” are launching businesses to feed a growing appetite for crickets, mealworms and other edible insects.

These upstarts are trying to persuade more Americans to eat bugs, which can be produced with less land, food and water than other sources of animal protein."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

EU citizens should eat more insects, says industry

EU citizens should eat more insects, says industry | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The mealworm, silkworms, the housefly and the black soldier fly are some of the insects Europeans should have as a natural part of their diet in the future as they are a good source for protein, says the insects sector.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"The International Platform of Insects for Food and Feed (IPIFF) wants to promote insects as a source for animal protein for both human consumption and animal feed."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Dining with Insects and Wine

Dining with Insects and Wine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FARGO, N.D. -
A trending tasting event, is creeping and crawling its way into Fargo.

Dozens of people took part in wine and bug sampling for the Northern Plains Botanic Garden Society.

If you're allergic to seafood, you may want to skip the insects.But for this group of fifty, they decided to take a bite out of nature.

You may cringe, scream or squash any insect you meet. But for this group, it's a different story, they're paring crickets, grasshoppers and even scorpions with wine.

But why?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Quand nos biftecks auront six pattes

Quand nos biftecks auront six pattes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
L'Agence nationale de sécurité sanitaire de l'alimentation publie un avis sur les dangers potentiels de la consommation d'insectes.
Un parfum de noisette nuancé de cacahuète ; un goût acidulé ou des arômes de céréales. Du moins faut-il en croire les amateurs. Car autant l'avouer: Aristote a eu beau chanter leur «saveur exquise», votre servante n'a pas poussé la déontologie jusqu'à tenter l'apéro aux nymphes de cigale avant d'écrire ces lignes.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insect and wine tasting about protein

Insect and wine tasting about protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FARGO—Maurice Degrugillier wants to put a bug in your ear. Not literally, of course. He actually wants to put a couple in your mouth.

The retired entomologist is helping organize a wine and insect pairing at Stoker's Lounge in the basement of the Hotel Donaldson in downtown Fargo.

Th...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Insects Improve Food Security 

Insects Improve Food Security  | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Meet Sengthong. Whether he knows it or not, he is playing a vital role in improving food security in Laos, a country where over 40% of children are undernourished. 

Sengthong explains, "I started to collect when I was 35 years old. No one taught me; I did it myself. At first when I was collecting, I used my own hands. I couldn't collect a lot so I started using a small plastic bag. I then changed to using a bigger bag, wish which I can collect by swinging it around. I concentrate on collecting insects to sell for my income. Because I otherwise don't know how I would make money."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

▶ Next Millennium Farms - Insect Farming, Cricket Farming making Insect Protein and Cricket Flour - YouTube

https://youtu.be/NvEJxnpC7Uw
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Are insects the next big green food?

Are insects the next big green food? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Author of iDisrupted predicts that super scaleable, high protein insects could be a major contributor to the world food supply.

London, UK (March 25, 2015) iDisrupted - Are insects the meat of the future? John Straw, co-author of the new book iDisrupted thinks so, and here he explains why…

According to the United Nations, livestock uses around 30% of the world’s ice-free land mass and produces 14.5% of all greenhouse-gas emissions. Making meat also requires supplying animals with vast amounts of water and food. For example, in the United States producing 1kg of live animal weight typically requires 10kg of feed for beef, 5kg for pork and 2.5kg for poultry. Insects on the otherhand are much easier to raise; they produce less waste and the world has a huge supply.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ana C. Day
Scoop.it!

Edible insects go gourmet for world’s largest gathering of explorers

Edible insects go gourmet for world’s largest gathering of explorers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The Explorers Club highlights the sustainable potential of eating bugs with its annual awards dinner menu.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"This year, the menu at the awards dinner will also require some adventurousness. The club tapped “Bug Chef” David George Gordon to create a menu that will not only be unusual, but also highlight the sustainable and traditional aspects of eating insects. Insects have been widely discussed as a more efficient form of protein, and have been offered as a solution to food security in a world with a growing population."

more...
No comment yet.