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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Creepy crawly cravings

Creepy crawly cravings | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Imagine eating worms in porridge, locusts on pizza and bug bolognaise - and all this without a Bushtucker Trial in sight! Popping in for a spot of breakfast, we meet Peter Bickerton, 24, a man who eats critters every single day.

Peter swears his I’m A Celeb diet is great for his health, but is that enough to tempt Phillip and Holly to tuck in too?

Catch up with anything you've missed on This Morning on ITV Player
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Fancy cricket risotto or mealworm cake?

Fancy cricket risotto or mealworm cake? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects including locusts, crickets and mealworms will become a popular and necessary part of our diets, a scientist predicts.
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One man’s meat, another man’s poison - Nation | The Star Online

One man’s meat, another man’s poison - Nation | The Star Online | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

INSECTS, spiders and bugs are not halal and cannot be consumed by Muslims.

Ana C. Day's insight:

“You are obliged to eat food that is halal and good. There are good things that you can eat and there are bad things that you should avoid.

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Ants, Spiders and Cockroaches: Saving the World...One Mouthful at a Time - SPIEGEL ONLINE

Ants, Spiders and Cockroaches: Saving the World...One Mouthful at a Time - SPIEGEL ONLINE | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Westerners might get a bit queasy when they think about eating locusts, spiders or ants, but they make up delicacies and key sources of protein in much of the world.
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Locusts for lunch, beetles for dinner | Radio Netherlands Worldwide

Locusts for lunch, beetles for dinner | Radio Netherlands Worldwide | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Heat some vegetable oil, fry the locusts, add sugar for caramelisation, let them cool off and dip them in chocolate. Voilà your afternoon snack. But don’t forget to take off the wings fir...
Ana C. Day's insight:

by Mirjam van den Berg

Eating insects is still a bridge too far for many people, especially in Western cultures. “But,” argues cook Henk van Gurp, who has been using insects in his recipes for some 20 years, “They're an excellent source of proteins. Besides, in many countries fried larvae are a delicacy. And secretly, insects are already being used in a lot of food, only the manufacturer prefers to call them ‘animal proteins’, not mealworms.”

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Bring on the Bugs | Solutions

Bring on the Bugs | Solutions | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ana C. Day's insight:

"We come from a long line of bug eaters. Our earliest primate ancestors were insectivores, and our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees, make rudimentary tools to fish termites out of narrow tunnels in their mounds. Among the laws of Leviticus codified by the Israelites millennia ago is permission to eat “the locust after its kind, and the bald locust after its kind, and the cricket after its kind, and the grasshopper after its kind."

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This utility model claims an edible insect protein powder and producing... - IP.com

The invention claims an edible insect protein powder. It mainly takes of mint and periostracum cicadae chinese shrimp it is also called the flour weevil as...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The invention claims an edible insect protein powder. It mainly takes of mint and periostracum cicadae chinese shrimp it is also called the flour weevil as follows locust and silkworm pupa and other edible insect as representative of the insect. At home and abroad market the developed products in mainly includes special animal feed and edible insect table dish and a certain quantity of insects material are used as pet feed. To the edible insect protein powder home and abroad and so on is no report about both. The purpose of this invention is to develop an edible insect protein powder the edible insect protein powder a production method and application."

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Top 10 facts about grasshoppers | Top 10 Facts | Fun | Daily Express

Top 10 facts about grasshoppers | Top 10 Facts | Fun | Daily Express | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Wahaca Mexican restaurant on London’s South Bank will today be offering a new item on their menu: Chapulines fundido, a dish made with grasshoppers.
Ana C. Day's insight:

1. Grasshoppers and locusts are the same: when they emigrate in swarms they are called locusts.

2. A grasshopper’s eardrum is on its abdomen, so you could say they hear with their bellies.

3. The fossil record shows that grasshoppers have been around for 200 million years and had evolved before the dinosaurs appeared.

4. Grasshoppers are good at detecting rhythm, but bad at detecting differences in pitch of notes.

5. They make noises by stridulating (rubbing the hind leg against the wing) and crepitating (snapping the wing in flight).

6. The 10,000 or so different species of grasshopper have distinct identifying rhythms.

7. In Japan, grasshoppers are seen as a sign of good luck.

8. Grasshoppers can jump a height of about 25cm and length of a metre.

9. A small cuticle in a grasshopper’s knee acts as a spring and lets it catapult its body into the air.

10. Eating insects is called ‘entomophagy’. Chapulines fundido (grasshopper fondue) consists of crispy fried grasshoppers on a bed of a puree of grasshoppers with shallots, garlic and chilli.

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Feasting On Locusts - A Recipe From Moshe Basson's Kitchen

Feasting On Locusts - A Recipe From Moshe Basson's Kitchen | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
When does a plague of insects become a healthy snack? When locusts descend on earth. Free food! When Egyptian skies darkened with tiny whirring creatures bound for tender field crops, Israeli farme...
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When God gives you locusts, make locust stew

When God gives you locusts, make locust stew | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The insect plaguing southern Israel at the moment makes a perfect treat for Passover - it is kosher, parve, healthy, affordable, and environmentally friendly.
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Bugs Benedict / Which backyard insects are best to eat?

Bugs Benedict / Which backyard insects are best to eat? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A man died Friday after eating scores of cockroaches, worms, and millipedes in a contest. Last year, Slate explained which bugs are safest to eat. The article is reprinted below.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Even venomous insects are usually OK to eat if you cook them. Heat changes the chemical structure of the venom, rendering it harmless. Scorpions, for example, are a delicacy in parts of Asia. Nervous diners can cut off the end of the tail, where the venom gland and stinger are located, but Asian gourmands usually eat the whole bug."

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It's time to eat insects for the good of the planet, say experts

It's time to eat insects for the good of the planet, say experts | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects are full of protein, easy to raise and less harmful to the environment than conventional livestock, say experts. It is now time for Europeans to get over their knee-jerk 'yuck' reaction to the thought of eating them.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Insects contain more protein per mouthful than beef, are low in fat, high in vitamin B and rearing them causes much less damage to the environment than cows, sheep and pigs.

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Here's Why You Should Start Eating (More) Bugs

Here's Why You Should Start Eating (More) Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Wait, just hear us out. Insects could be the next big thing in food....
Ana C. Day's insight:

"In 2012, we rediscovered kale and started nibbling on gluten-free everything. Then 2013 brought us Cronuts, the delicious pastry mashup. We've obsessed over Sriracha, pumpkin spice, seaweed -- but what will be the next big trend in food?

Bugs! It could be, anyway. Entomophagy, the practice of eating insects, is hailed by entomologists, or people who study them, as a healthy and eco-friendly food solution with a strong culinary tradition (in some cultures). A few high-end restaurants have already put them on the menu. The Michelin-starred Aphrodite restaurant in France, for example, serves up mealworms and crickets with foie gras. British chef Peter Gorton created a menu with entomologist Peter Smithers to feature bugs in every dish.

David Faure, who runs Aphrodite, told Bloomberg the idea to cook with bugs was a product of his world travels. "It’s really a question of taste," the chef said.

And indeed, it's no secret that people generally associate bugs with..."

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Imagine you're hungry. Which insect would you be most prepared to eat?

Imagine you're hungry. Which insect would you be most prepared to eat? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Times Food wants to know... Imagine you're hungry. Which insect would you be most prepared to eat? pick one: Catepillar, Bee larvae, Crickets, Locusts or Worms
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A Taste Of The Future Of Food

A Taste Of The Future Of Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Transcript CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST: Unless you've been hiding under a burger bun for the past week, you've probably heard the story about the lab
Ana C. Day's insight:

"HEADLEE: One of the other things that's just coming up recently is the idea of insects as food. And, in fact, you can actually do searches on the Internet and find restaurants that feature either ground-up insects or insects whole.

(LAUGHTER)

HEADLEE: Could we be seeing more and more insects creeping into our food?

GAYE: It's already quite popular in a few European countries, especially the Netherlands where they're, year on year, growing and selling many more insects. But also, there are countries like Australia where they've decided to call locusts flying prawns or flying shrimp, and they found that people eat them much more readily if they have a different name. But also, ground-up grasshoppers ground into bars such as muesli bars with fruits and nuts, using a cricket flower. People actua...."

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Nation not ready for insect diet, expert warns - People's Daily Online

Nation not ready for insect diet, expert warns - People's Daily Online | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
AnexpertsaysChinaisnotreadyformassconsumptionofinsects,whichtheUNFoodandAgricultura
Ana C. Day's insight:

"An expert says China is not ready for mass consumption of insects, which the UN Foodand Agricultural Organization claims could protect the environment and help solve thefood crisis.

The solution to the global problem comes in a research report titled Edible Insects:Future Prospects for Food and Feed Security, issued by the organization.

The publication also covers other creatures eaten by humans, including spiders andscorpions.

High in protein, vitamins, fiber and mineral content, insects will become a new dietarytrend, the report states.

However, Gao Xiwu, an entomologist at Chinese Agricultural University who specializesin the economic value of insects, said China, one of the largest insect-consumingcountries, is not ready for the mass consumption of insects."

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Grow Your Own Locust Kit Could Someday Help Feed African Refugees : NPR

Grow Your Own Locust Kit Could Someday Help Feed African Refugees : NPR | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects, such as locust and grasshoppers, are a cheap source of protein that requires minimum resources to farm.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"When it comes to environmentally-friendly meat, insects can't be beat. As The Saltreported last year, grasshoppers, crickets, and beetles are four times more efficient at converting grasses into protein-packed meat than cattle. Insects generate lessgreenhouse gases than cows, eat just about anything and survive in dry, inhospitable environments."

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Eating bugs may be on the rise, but artful preparation is still required

Eating bugs may be on the rise, but artful preparation is still required | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insect meat is on the rise.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Insect meat is on the rise. It’s an inexpensive source of low-fat, high-quality, vitamin-and-mineral-packed protein, so it’s unsurprisingly popular in developing countries. While people eat bugs because of limited access to poultry and livestock, Lemann points out that they also enjoy them, and not just in the developing world. The Dutch appear to be the first Westerners to let insects crawl onto their menus. Mark Cashoek’s Specktakel restaurant in Haarlem, Netherlands offers special all-insect meals.

Insect-eating advocates say that cultivating edible locusts, crickets and mealworms (aptly called “mini-livestock”) could stave-off world hunger. Plus, they have a much smaller carbon-footprint than traditional meat sources says Professor Arnold van Huis, an entomologist at Netherlands' Wageningen University. His 2010 United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization policy paper points out that mini-livestock emits 10 times less methane than typical livestock, generates 300 times less nitrous oxide and much less ammonia."

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The Cure to the World’s Protein Problem: Grilled Locusts in Thailand - The Taste of Tomorrow

The Cure to the World’s Protein Problem: Grilled Locusts in Thailand - The Taste of Tomorrow | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Dispatches from the Future of Food
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Can eating insects save the world? TV chef Stefan Gates thinks so and gave me a taste test

Can eating insects save the world? TV chef Stefan Gates thinks so and gave me a taste test | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Stefan is convinced that as the price of meat and grain soars we will have to change the way we think about food
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More of a delicacy than a plague: Swarm of locusts that descended on Israel are welcomed with open arms by kosher chefs

More of a delicacy than a plague: Swarm of locusts that descended on Israel are welcomed with open arms by kosher chefs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A swarm of around one million locusts has arrived in Israel just in time for Passover but local chefs say it is not a plague, but a kosher blessing.
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Insects could be the planet's next food source... even if that gives you the creeps

Insects could be the planet's next food source... even if that gives you the creeps | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A festival next month in London aims to take the yuck factor out of eating bugs and promote the environmental benefits
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Environmental manipulation for edible insect procurement: a historical perspective

Environmental manipulation for edible insect procurement: a historical perspective | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Throughout history humans have manipulated their natural environment for an increased predictability and availability of plant and animal resources.

Ana C. Day's insight:

From the perspective of hunting individual animals in relation to their body size, insects can generally be considered low ranked food sources as the return rates (energy gained minus energy costs from searching, handling, and processing) of large animals is higher

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