Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Crickets, locusts, flies — yum? The case for edible insects

Crickets, locusts, flies — yum? The case for edible insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

If you found ants or a beetle on your dinner plate, chances are you’d either flip your plate over or calmly dump it in the trash. But what if bugs became a standard part of the human diet? With the growth of entomophagy, or the practice of eating insects, around the world, consumption of bugs may become common enough that you’ll welcome bugs in your breakfast.

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Would you eat at this restaurant?

Would you eat at this restaurant? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Last year’s event attracted more than 3,000 hungry Londoners looking to sample the unorthodox fare on offer, and Rentokil expects even more visitors to have stopped by this time around. Since its initial success last summer, Pestaurant events have taken place across the globe, including pop-ups in Washington DC, Cape Town, Sydney, Dubai and Paris, but today returned to where it all began in August 2013

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Anyone for cricket. . . or perhaps a locust? - Independent.ie

Anyone for cricket. . . or perhaps a locust? - Independent.ie | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Forget lab-grown burgers, the future of protein consumption lies in creepy, crawly, crunchy insects

Ana C. Day's insight:

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The health food credentials are impressive. The report reads: "The composition of unsaturated omega-3 and six fatty acids in mealworms is comparable with that in fish and higher than in cattle and pigs.

The protein, vitamin and mineral content is similar to that in fish and meat. Many insects are rich in protein and good fats and high in calcium, iron and zinc."

It's why 1,900 species are eaten today in Africa, Asia and South America. They eat beetles (31pc of the world's population), caterpillars (18pc), bees, wasps and ants (14pc) crickets and grasshoppers and locusts (13pc)."

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Land of the locust eaters | Bangkok Post: lifestyle

Land of the locust eaters | Bangkok Post: lifestyle | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In depth coverage of lifestyle, music, food, fashion, arts and culture from Thailand and Asean coupled with reviews, features and directories of Thailand restaurants, bars, cuisine and wine.
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The locust-eaters of Israel

The locust-eaters of Israel | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Israel is in the grip of a locust invasion, but some people are taking a novel approach to pest control - eating them.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"

None of this gives locusts a good reputation, but "they taste very nice, I can tell you!" says Arnold van Huis, Professor of Tropical Entomology at Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

Van Huis is one of the world's leading advocates for eating insects and has even been advising the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on the issue.

"Attention is growing exponentially," he says pointing to the fact that an international meeting on the subject will be held in May of this year.

Van Huis says it is completely normal for people in places that suffer from locust plagues to eat them.

Insects of all sorts are eaten in most African countries, he says - and for good reason.

 "
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Rescue Kit Encourages Refugees To Grow Insects As Food - PSFK

Rescue Kit Encourages Refugees To Grow Insects As Food - PSFK | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Instead of making one-time food drops, the Locust Farm concept gives refugees the tools they need to grow their own grasshoppers.
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Edible Insects

By the end of this year the global population is predicted to hit 7 billion and by 2050 may be as high as 9 billion. Simply feeding that many people is a challenge…
Ana C. Day's insight:

Amazing video !!!

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What will we be eating in 20 years' time?

What will we be eating in 20 years' time? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Why insect burgers could replace the hamburger on dinner plates.
Ana C. Day's insight:

It's a win-win situation. Insects provide as much nutritional value as ordinary meat and are a great source of protein, according to researchers at Wageningen University in the Netherlands. They also cost less to raise than cattle, consume less water and do not have much of a carbon footprint.

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Epicurean Explorers Bring Edible Insects Into The Mainstream - PSFK

Epicurean Explorers Bring Edible Insects Into The Mainstream - PSFK | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Edible is a UK-based online storefront bringing unique and unusual delicacies from around the world to Western cultures in a palatable way.

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All products are manufactured under strict hygiene standards, fully complying with all UK and European Union Community guidelines on food standards and safety.

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Dutch Try to Change ‘Ick’ to ‘Yum’ for Insect Dishes

Dutch Try to Change ‘Ick’ to ‘Yum’ for Insect Dishes | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
A movement in the Netherlands is trying to convince the Dutch that crickets, worms and caterpillars are healthier sources of protein than meat.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Mr. Van Dongen is head of the meat department at Sligro,  Besides steaks, poultry and others kinds of meat, he offers mealworms, buffalo worms, locusts and other insects, as well as prepared products containing insects like Bugs Sticks and Bugs Nuggets — not for pets, but as a source of protein for people.

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The Benefits of Eating Insects

The Benefits of Eating Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Insects are nutritious and easy to raise without harming the environment. They also have a nice nutty taste. Marcel Dicke and Arnold van Huis on why insects are the meat of the future.
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Insect burgers: EU plan to promote eating insects as protein

Insect burgers: EU plan to promote eating insects as protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Research projects funded with 3 million euros by the European Commission, to promote eating insects, are to be decided on this year. So far research points towards disguising insects as a processed protein source to make the idea more palatable.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The European Commission decided to fund research to the tune of three million euros, to come up with the best proposal for using insects as a protein source.


The U.S. does of course already allow insect fragments and rodent hairs to be contained within processed foods"


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Easy food crisis solution: Bugs and seaweed

Easy food crisis solution: Bugs and seaweed | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Much of the conversation about how to solve the coming food crisis avoids the issue of broadening our appetites.
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15 Reasons Why People Who Eat Insects Are Saving The World and Themselves

15 Reasons Why People Who Eat Insects Are Saving The World and Themselves | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
1. Insects are  more sustainable and ethical  than chicken, pork, or beef...maybe even fish! 2. The  UN has advocated for eating insects 3. Growing grain and then feeding it to animals so we can...
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Alternative snack protein: “Hybrid” meat wins over insects, lentils and seaweed

Alternative snack protein: “Hybrid” meat wins over insects, lentils and seaweed | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Locusts, lentils, seaweed or “hybrid” meat? Researchers have found that consumers prefer the thought of non-specified meat substitute snacks over those containing insects or seaweed. 
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A Taste Of The Future Of Food

Transcript CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST: Unless you've been hiding under a burger bun for the past week, you've probably heard the story about the lab
Ana C. Day's insight:

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HEADLEE: One of the other things that's just coming up recently is the idea of insects as food. And, in fact, you can actually do searches on the Internet and find restaurants that feature either ground-up insects or insects whole.

(LAUGHTER)

HEADLEE: Could we be seeing more and more insects creeping into our food?

GAYE: It's already quite popular in a few European countries, especially the Netherlands where they're, year on year, growing and selling many more insects. But also, there are countries like Australia where they've decided to call locusts flying prawns or flying shrimp, and they found that people eat them much more readily if they have a different name. But also, ground-up grasshoppers ground into bars such as muesli bars with fruits and nuts, using a cricket flower. People actually don't know it's insects at all.

So, I think when we grind them up and we make insect patties - mixed with vegetables and onions - people don't really know any different.

HEADLEE: Have you eaten them?

GAYE: I have eaten them. Actually pretty good and they all taste quite differently; some are quite cheesy, others are a bit like lemon, and some are sort of nutty. And I think that's it really is just about the way we're socialized around animals and insects where we think, ew, creepy crawlies or bugs or they're dirty. But the way in which they're bred is actually incredibly hygienic. They love to be bred in captivity in small spaces."

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Should you really start eating insects?

Should you really start eating insects? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Earlier this month, the UN released a paper touting the nutritional and environmental benefits of insects. The paper caused quite a stir in the media, with a mix of fascination, head-nodding, and not a little revulsion.
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FOOD TECHNOLOGIST's curator insight, June 13, 2013 9:33 PM

start eating insects

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Israeli locust plague is a blessing for adventurous palates

Israeli locust plague is a blessing for adventurous palates | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Millions of locusts have swarmed into Israel just two weeks before Passover – and on to plates of hungry diners
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Bioline International Official Site (site up-dated regularly)

Bioline International Official Site (site up-dated regularly) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Processed products of termites and lake flies: Improving entomophagy for food security Within the Lake Victoria region.


Ana C. Day's insight:

" Edible insects can provide partial solution to food insecurity. The aim of this project was to promote entomophagy for food security by adding value to termites and lake flies, enhancing taste and preference of edible insects, and improving shelf life of edible insect products in marginal areas with food insecurity."

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Overcoming the Yuckiness of Eating Bugs Can Help Save the World / Why You Should Love Grasshopper Tacos and Kelp Pasta.

Overcoming the Yuckiness of Eating Bugs Can Help Save the World / Why You Should Love Grasshopper Tacos and Kelp Pasta. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Read more from Slate’s special issue on the future of food. About 200 years ago, the lobster was regarded by most Americans as a filthy, bottom-feeding scavenger unfit for consumption by civilized people.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Many insects are what you might call superfood—rich in protein, low in fat and cholesterol, high in essential vitamins and minerals like calcium and iron. More important, insects are green super-foods. Bugs are cold-blooded (they don’t waste energy to stay warm), so they’re far more efficient at converting feed to meat than cattle or pigs. Ten grams of feed produces one gram of beef or three grams of pork, but it can yield nine grams of edible insect meat, according research from Arnold van Huis, an entomologist at Wageningen University."

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The future of food: algae, insects and lab-grown meat

The future of food: algae, insects and lab-grown meat | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
How can we feed the 2.5 billion more people - an extra China and India - likely to be alive in 2050?
Ana C. Day's insight:

The UN says we will have to nearly double our food production and governments say we should adopt new technologies and avoid waste.


Locusts, grasshoppers, spiders, wasps, worms, ants and beetles are not on most European or US menus but at least 1,400 species are eaten across Africa, Latin America and Asia. Now, with rising food prices and worldwide land shortages, it could be just a matter of time before insect farms set up in Britain.

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Adventures in Food Their ideas may seem radical, but these food revolutionaries aim to change how the world eats.

Adventures in Food Their ideas may seem radical, but these food revolutionaries aim to change how the world eats. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
One of the main themes of the 2010 TEDGlobal conference in Oxford was food—where it comes from, how we buy it, and what it does for our brains. The subject couldn’t be more timely, though being optimistic about food news takes some patient searching.
Ana C. Day's insight:

World population is set to grow to 9 billion by 2050, and the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) estimates that to feed this number, we’ll need to increase agricultural production by 70 percent.

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Insect farmer | Farming Futures

Insect farmer | Farming Futures | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ana C. Day's insight:

Professor Arnold van Huis from Wageningen University in the Netherlands is a consultant for the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organisation. He said: "Producing a kilogram of meat from a cow requires 13kg of vegetable matter as feed. Yet 1kg of meat from a cricket, locust or beetle needs just 1.5 to 2kg of fodder, and produces a fraction of the CO2 emissions.

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Bugs: They do grow on trees

Bugs: They do grow on trees | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
As Mexico's centuries-old tradition of eating bugs becomes more lucrative, researchers are trying to convince poor villages to cash in on these pests as a means of income.
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Insects will be important part of UK diet by 2020, says scientist

Insects will be important part of UK diet by 2020, says scientist | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Consumers in the UK will turn to insects as food as conventional meat becomes scarce, says entomologist
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