Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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From fried insects to coffee with BUTTER: The weird and wonderful foods we will all be eating this summer.

From fried insects to coffee with BUTTER: The weird and wonderful foods we will all be eating this summer. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
5. It’s a bug’s life 

Creepy-crawlies are fast growing in popularity as protein rich insects are becoming firm fixtures in restaurant menus. 

Entomophagy – the practice of eating insects - remains common in some parts of the world with at least two billion people worldwide eating insects, the Food and Agriculture Organisation at the UN reported. 
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Edible Insects: Hornets taste like sausage | Business as Unusual

Edible Insects: Hornets taste like sausage | Business as Unusual | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Yes, I am quoting the Lion King - I have no shame. Not only is it one of the most tear-jerking Disney films, but it has educational value when it comes to entomophagy.

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Bug bonanza: It’s time for Westerners to reimagine protein

Bug bonanza: It’s time for Westerners to reimagine protein | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In the Gospels, John the Baptist, who wore itchy camel hair clothes under the hot sun of the Middle East, subsisted on a diet of wild locusts and honey. Today Jesus’ gastronomically adventurous cousin would be just another foot soldier in a food revolution to reclaim 10 quintillion tiny creatures for the dinner table. It’s all part of a movement to break the taboo that Westerners have against eating the world’s most plentiful source of protein — insects. Across the United States, high-end restaurants and even some that cater to a more downscale clientele have begun to experiment with menus that feature such fare as wax moth larvae tacos and meal worms sprinkled over conventional food like ice cream. Supermarkets have begun selling crickets that can be fried and served as gourmet
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Get figgy with simple yet spectacular dessert

Get figgy with simple yet spectacular dessert | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Late-summer figs are reason enough to put up with the long, hot summer in Louisiana. When it's picking time and the juices are literally oozing from these sweet, meaty morsels, I'm there with bushel baskets in hand.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"He says there is an insect — a wasp — inside every fig that is absorbed within the fruit. The fig wasp pollinates the fruit and dies inside, which adds insect protein to the fruit

 

Without the wasps, there are no figs. According to a reliable source, most fruits and vegetables contain insects. Even tomatoes contain trace amounts of fruit fly eggs — it’s just the natural order of things."

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Bugged by food shortages? Why insects could feed the world

Bugged by food shortages? Why insects could feed the world | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
With the growing population, the need for alternative food sources to feed billions is dire. Industrial designer Katharina Unger believes she has a solution to the problem: She thinks you should all eat bugs.
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Worm: the Other Red Meat | OnEarth Magazine

Worm: the Other Red Meat | OnEarth Magazine | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

For a semester-ending celebration, the professor in my undergraduate entomology class served us up plates of termite cookies, chocolate-covered crickets, and spicy fried mealworms.

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Grub's up: can insects feed the world? - NDTVCooks.com

Grub's up: can insects feed the world? - NDTVCooks.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Grub's up: can insects feed the world? . Two billion people already eat insects as part of their regular diet - bugs may not sound appealing, but once upon a time neither did sushi. Is it time to put ants, beetles and locusts on the menu?
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Could creepy-crawlies become part of the British diet? | Health | Life & Style | Daily Express

Could creepy-crawlies become part of the British diet? | Health | Life & Style | Daily Express | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
FROM the harrowing bush tucker trials of I’m a Celebrity... Get Me Out of Here! to Bear Grylls gobbling giant larvae in the name of survival, eating insects tends to be a way of increasing ratings.
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Alimentation : les insectes ont de l'avenir dans nos menus

Alimentation : les insectes ont de l'avenir dans nos menus | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Quiche à la larve de vers de farine, chocolat au grillon, il y a déjà des amateurs «Le grillon de Saint-Orens figurera sur la carte des restaurants toulousains. » Cédric Auriol est...
Ana C. Day's insight:

«Le grillon de Saint-Orens figurera sur la carte des restaurants toulousains. » Cédric Auriol est convaincu que les insectes, source importante de protéines, feront partie demain de notre nourriture. C’est pourquoi il a créé en 2011 Micronutris, à Saint-Orens, aux portes de Toulouse, la première ferme d’élevage à produire des insectes comestibles nés et élevés en France, et nourris à partir d’aliments issus de l’agriculture biologique.

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Edible Insects: Gross-Out or Global Food Solution?

Edible Insects: Gross-Out or Global Food Solution? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cultural attitudes toward food tend to change slowly. But as we struggle to feed a growing population, insects present a remarkably plentiful source of nutrition.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"ndeed, novelty and fundtemraising are far from the only motivations for broadening one’s culinary horizons. Today there are a billion hungry people on the planet. That number is going to grow, and the cost of food is already soaring. Over the past year, real food prices (adjusted for inflation) have risen by 33 percent, and according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, a further 20 to 30 percent increase is expected in the next ten years."

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entomophagy, eating insects, eating bugs, bugs, insects, food, bugs as food

entomophagy, eating insects, eating bugs, bugs, insects, food, bugs as food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Entomophagy is the concept and practice of eating insects.
The idea of eating insects is not a new ideology.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"A good argument in favor of ingesting some creepy crawling insects is there fast reproduction and minimal resource usage. When compared with a cow or pig or even poultry, an insect colony would need to consume far less food to maintain them. Traditional livestock also require veterinary care. Insect life cycle is rather short as compared to a cattle where months need to go by before it is ready for slaughter house and our dinner tables. "

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Eco-Friendly Protein: Edible Bugs | WebEcoist

Eco-Friendly Protein: Edible Bugs | WebEcoist | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Though they are relegated to game show gross-out props in much of the West, bugs are quite eco-friendly protein sources.
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Insects for dinner... but not as guests < Dining & Cuisine | Expatica France

Insects for dinner... but not as guests < Dining & Cuisine | Expatica France | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
”Beetle larva on a skewerExperts from Costa Rica travelled to Benin for the project
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Now, three developing countries on three different continents are promoting insects as food for humans. Costa Rica, Benin and Bhutan want top quality restaurants to start putting larva and tarantula spiders on the menu. The Netherlands is paying the bill for the project.

Why should a shrimp be tastier than a beetle? Why are worms only considered to be edible in extreme situations? Experts say it is simply a matter of culture and psychology."


Watch video !!!

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These 15 Insects Are Totally Edible, But Are They Delicious? Try Them And See

These 15 Insects Are Totally Edible, But Are They Delicious? Try Them And See | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
I always knew that some cultures eat bugs. As a kid, I could never figure out why. I liked McNuggets and Happy Meals. Why did some kids around the world prefer scorpions and worms?Since I grew up, ...
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Hoxton’s pop-up answer to I’m A Celebrity will serve beetle larvae, meal worms, crickets and grasshoppers

Hoxton’s pop-up answer to I’m A Celebrity will serve beetle larvae, meal worms, crickets and grasshoppers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Beetle larvae, meal worms, crickets and grasshoppers are gracing the menu at Hoxton’s answer to the Bushtucker Trials next week.
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Les insectes, nourriture du futur ? - 25 janvier à 14h00

Les insectes, nourriture du futur ? -  25 janvier à 14h00 | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
La faim n'est plus un problème prédominant en Europe et il faut s'en féliciter. Pour autant, les experts ne cessent de s'interroger sur la nourriture de demain : comment répondre à toutes les exigences ?
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Les aliments doivent être respectueux de l’environnement, sains, savoureux, adaptés à la vie moderne, aux nouveaux modes de consommation. Leur ingestion doit être ultra-rapide, et, en option, ils pourraient prévenir les infections, voire les guérir… Impossible de correspondre à tous ces critères ? Que non ! Prenez le rouleau de printemps aux larves de papillon et aux criquets… À Londres, les reporters de Yourope sont allés jeter un coup d’œil dans les cuisines de jeunes designers culinaires. Eux sont persuadés que les Européens vont adorer les insectes dès lors qu’ils ne sont plus identifiables comme tels : sous forme de gâteau ou de viande hachée. À midi, ils ont déjeuné avec un visionnaire qui veut conquérir l’Allemagne avec son concept de fast-food végétalien. Bientôt la révolution dans les cuisines et dans l’estomac des Européens ?"

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Feast on insects at the Eat Ento pop-up – Now. Here. This. – Time Out London

Feast on insects at the Eat Ento pop-up – Now. Here. This. – Time Out London | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Eating insects isn’t confined to TV stars shoving them in live and wriggling as they endure another bushtucker trial on 'I’m a Celebrity...’; the future for creepy crawlie meals is looking bright. ...
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notliebags's comment, August 12, 2013 11:34 AM
delicious
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One man’s meat, another man’s poison - Nation | The Star Online

One man’s meat, another man’s poison - Nation | The Star Online | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

INSECTS, spiders and bugs are not halal and cannot be consumed by Muslims.

Ana C. Day's insight:

“You are obliged to eat food that is halal and good. There are good things that you can eat and there are bad things that you should avoid.

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Waterford Today - Strange but - True!

Waterford Today - Strange but - True! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Waterford Today - Waterford's free weekly newspaper. Waterford's only newspaper circulated freely to the people of Waterford since 1989. Waterford Today Newspaper has grown into being Waterford's biggest media success story to date.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Q. Consider what life would be like if people were really rational about what they're eating, at least according to advocates of entomophagy?

A. That's the term for eating insects, which makes a lot more sense than what we're currently doing, argues Glenn Zorpette in "IEEE Spectrum" magazine. For instance, cows, pigs, sheep, and chickens are fed on corn and soybeans, which are valuable crops we humans can eat. Cows and sheep also require great amounts of water and grazing land and, before being slaughtered, produce environmentally damaging solid and gaseous wastes. "Insects on the other hand can consume organic refuse, including spoiled food, rotted carcasses, even animal excretions. And the protein in an insect is every bit as healthy as what you're taking in now."

Insects have long been on the menu in less developed parts of the world, says Arnold van Huis, of the Wageningen University & Research Center in the Netherlands. He's coauthor of an insect cookbook and envisions big factory farms raising grubs, mealworms, and other larvae for human consumption. Every day, he says, he gets mail from somewhere in the world expressing interest in entomophagy.

Mail, yes, counters Zorpette, but "I don't have the heart to tell him it's only because people think his taste for bugs is so bizarre."

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Gourmet insects: Four dishes filled with grubs

Read more: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21929242.100 Insects could be the solution to an impending global food crisis, but not in the way you might ...
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Eating insects could help fight obesity, U.N. says

Eating insects could help fight obesity, U.N. says | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
* Many insects have as much protein as meat, study says
Ana C. Day's insight:

"As well as helping in the costly battle against obesity,
which the World Health Organisation estimates has nearly doubled
since 1980 and affects around 500 million people, the report
said insect farming was likely to be less land-dependent than
traditional livestock and produce fewer greenhouse gases.

It would also provide business and export opportunities for
poor people in developing countries, especially women, who are
often responsible for collecting insects in rural communities."

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Insects May Be The Most Sustainable Food Source - PSFK

Insects May Be The Most Sustainable Food Source - PSFK | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
London festival aims to take the ick factor out of eating bugs and promote the environmental benefits.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Crunchy, full of protein and to be found under a rock near you. Insects have long been overlooked as food in all but a handful of places around the world – but now they are crawling closer and closer to our plates.

This spring will see a drive towards removing the yuck factor and putting insects not just on experimental gastronomic menus but also on supermarket shelves.

In April there will be a festival in London, Pestival 2013 – a Wellcome Trust-backed insect appreciation event where the consumption of creepy-crawlies comes high on the agenda. It will feature a two-day “pop-up” restaurant by the Nordic Food Lab, the Scandinavian team behind the Danish restaurant Noma, which brought ants to the table for a sellout 10-day run at Claridge’s hotel in Mayfair last year."

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In Copenhagen, daring to innovate on the plate | SmartPlanet

In Copenhagen, daring to innovate on the plate | SmartPlanet | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
At the internationally-renowned restaurant Noma in Copenhagen, finding an insect in your food is a reason to dig in, not send it back.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"

An important aspect of any such study is pathology: knowing which insects are safe to eat and which might make us sick. At the Food Lab, the staff use cultural practices as a starting point. If a certain insect is part of a human diet somewhere in the world, it is more likely to be pathogen-free. They read any books and papers they can find on the subject, and consult a professor of entomological parasitology.

Once they are convinced that a bug is safe, they search for the best ways to uncover its deliciousness, using some fairly complex processes. (This is where it helps to be a chef.) The first time the grasshoppers arrived, Reade immediately thought of turning them into a garum, using a fermentation technique going back to Roman times. When I visited, they had already made a garum with grasshoppers and wax moth larvae, with excellent results. On this day they decided to try it with bee larvae.

 "
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barfblog / How to make insects more upscale, safe food from farm to fork.

barfblog / How to make insects more upscale, safe food from farm to fork. | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

A bright, engaging man, Mr. Van Dongen is head of the meat department at Sligro, a kind of Costco on the edge of this trim Dutch town. Besides steaks, poultry and others kinds of meat, he offers mealworms, buffalo worms, locusts and other insects, as well as prepared products containing insects like Bugs Sticks and Bugs Nuggets — not for pets, but as a source of protein for people.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Dutch breeders of insects, who until now have supplied the market for pet food — insects for geckos and other lizards, salamanders, newts, frogs, birds or fish — have jumped at an opportunity to open a new market and have founded a trade organization to promote the idea. The government is backing them, and last year it appropriated $1.4 million for research into insects as food, to prepare legislation governing insect farms, health and safety standards, and marketing through retail outlets."

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healthfinder.gov - Mealworms: The Next High-Protein Food Source?

healthfinder.gov - Mealworms: The Next High-Protein Food Source? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
While beetle larvae may not seem appetizing, study finds they're more environmentally friendly than livestock.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Researchers in the Netherlands used three factors -- land usage, energy needs and greenhouse gas emissions -- to compare the environmental impact of mealworm farms to chicken, pork, beef or milk farms."

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