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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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From Paleo to Cricket Protein: 5 Natural Lifestyle Trends to Watch - Mommy Greenest

From Paleo to Cricket Protein: 5 Natural Lifestyle Trends to Watch - Mommy Greenest | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Want to know what’s the next quinoa or kale...crickets? Keep an eye on these five natural lifestyle trends!
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About 30 Days of Bugs

About 30 Days of Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Why would anyone eat bugs? Find out why entomophagy is a sustainable food practice.
The first thing you should know is that bugs are healthy.In fact, insects are so nutritious that the United Nations is encouraging people around the world to eat more of them. Yes, I said more of them. Approximately 2 billion people are already eating insects. It’s called entomophagy and it is a fancy word for bug consumption. Surprisingly, insects are one the healthiest foods you can eat. Critters like crickets, mealworms and waxworms are jam-packed with protein, fiber and healthy fats. They are creepy- crawly superfoods.
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Ant gin, cricket soup: Bugs crawl onto menu at Cordon Bleu

Ant gin, cricket soup: Bugs crawl onto menu at Cordon Bleu | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
BANGKOK (AP) — Bugs in a gourmet kitchen are usually something to be squashed or swatted. But at Le Cordon Bleu, the esteemed French cooking school, chefs and food scientists spent a week simmering, sauteing and grilling…
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U.S. cricket farming scales up

U.S. cricket farming scales up | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Tiny Farms co-founder Daniel Imrie-Situnayake is helping to lay the technology groundwork for industrial-scale insect production in the United States. Daniel Imrie-Situnayake Two billion people wor...
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Would you eat at this restaurant?

Would you eat at this restaurant? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Last year’s event attracted more than 3,000 hungry Londoners looking to sample the unorthodox fare on offer, and Rentokil expects even more visitors to have stopped by this time around. Since its initial success last summer, Pestaurant events have taken place across the globe, including pop-ups in Washington DC, Cape Town, Sydney, Dubai and Paris, but today returned to where it all began in August 2013

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Cricket Energy Bars Changing America's Mind About Eating Insects

Cricket Energy Bars Changing America's Mind About Eating Insects | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Creepy crawling critters cooked kind of deliciously--would you eat insects?
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Creepy crawling critters cooked kind of deliciously: this is the mission statement behind Pat Crowley, a Salt Lake City businessman and his partner Dan O'Neill plan for getting more Americans to eat insects. A journey that began in 2012, the business partners have been making a high-protein bar with crickets as their special ingredient."

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Cricket energy bars aim to get more Americans to eat bugs

Cricket energy bars aim to get more Americans to eat bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
This high protein energy bars contains flour made from baked and ground up crickets.
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Fox’s Ed Henry and Alicia Acuna Eat Bugs On-Air Because Why Not | Mediaite

Fox’s Ed Henry and Alicia Acuna Eat Bugs On-Air Because Why Not | Mediaite | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It's Friday, so for a news report about an energy bar made of crickets, Fox News' Alicia Acuna and Ed Henry decided to munch bugs right on the air.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"First it was vodka, now it’s bugs. There is a company in Utah trying to encourage people to eat insects with an energy bar made entirely from crickets. Fox News reporter Alicia Acuna went to see what the big deal is, and actually tried one of these crickets, and found it okay, you know, for a bug.

But the real treat came when anchor Julie Banderasforce-fed Ed Henry a cricket on live TV. It went over as well as you would expect, and Henry really, reallyneeded a sip of something to wash the “nasty” taste of cricket down."

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Bug buffet set for Feb. 21 at MSU

Bug buffet set for Feb. 21 at MSU | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

MSU will hold its 26th annual bug buffet from noon to 4 p.m. Feb. 21. It is free and open to the public.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"BOZEMAN – The annual opportunity to try cricket stir fry, wax moth quesadillas and mealworm dream bars is almost here, with fresh insects being flown in this week from northern Minnesota and Louisiana.

Montana State University will hold its 26th annual bug buffet from noon to 4 p.m. Friday, Feb. 21, in the Plant Growth Center along Eleventh Avenue. It is free and open to the public.

The buffet will offer seven entrees, appetizers and desserts that incorporate insects, also known as land shrimp, said MSU entomologist and buffet organizerFlorence Dunkel.  New this year will be a fresh garden salad with “hopper toppings.”  Land shrimp is a new term that refers to more than 1,900 documented species of edible insects."

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Chapul Cricket Bars | YourHub

Chapul Cricket Bars | YourHub | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Does the thought of eating bugs gross you out? This new line of protein bars might change your mind.

Chapul Cricket Bars founder Pat Crowley launched his company with a mission to create organic, sustainably produced, and tasty energy bars.

The inspiration behind his company is simple: insect protein is a solution to overconsumption of freshwater in agriculture. Since insects..."

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Here's Why You Should Start Eating (More) Bugs

Here's Why You Should Start Eating (More) Bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Wait, just hear us out. Insects could be the next big thing in food....
Ana C. Day's insight:

"In 2012, we rediscovered kale and started nibbling on gluten-free everything. Then 2013 brought us Cronuts, the delicious pastry mashup. We've obsessed over Sriracha, pumpkin spice, seaweed -- but what will be the next big trend in food?

Bugs! It could be, anyway. Entomophagy, the practice of eating insects, is hailed by entomologists, or people who study them, as a healthy and eco-friendly food solution with a strong culinary tradition (in some cultures). A few high-end restaurants have already put them on the menu. The Michelin-starred Aphrodite restaurant in France, for example, serves up mealworms and crickets with foie gras. British chef Peter Gorton created a menu with entomologist Peter Smithers to feature bugs in every dish.

David Faure, who runs Aphrodite, told Bloomberg the idea to cook with bugs was a product of his world travels. "It’s really a question of taste," the chef said.

And indeed, it's no secret that people generally associate bugs with..."

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Lunch In The Not-Too-Distant Future? (PHOTOS, VIDEO)

Lunch In The Not-Too-Distant Future? (PHOTOS, VIDEO) | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Daniella Martin is so buggy for bugs that she had toasted crickets at her wedding, and regularly makes tacos, pizzas and sandwiches using crickets, mealworms and drone bees.

Martin has been a committed entomophagist (the term for grub-loving gourm...
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This Beautiful Pottery Is Made of 3D-Printed Edible Bug Powder

This Beautiful Pottery Is Made of 3D-Printed Edible Bug Powder | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Susana Soares isn’t just making art; Her ongoing art project, Insects Au Gratin, asks why, precisely, we don’t eat bugs. On its face, it’s probably a bit unsettling to most Western viewers, but it’s an important question nonetheless. Soares teamed up with food bioscientist Kenneth Spears and 3D printing expert Peter Walters for the project, which begins by grinding insects into a sort of bug powder. We’ll spare you the gory details on how, precisely, the flour is made, but those interested in watching insects get, quite literally, run through the ringer, can check out an informative and jauntily-scored video here.
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Breaking the taste taboo

Breaking the taste taboo | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

The next taste taboo

With the raw fish and cheese hurdles overcome, what is next in modifying consumer taste preferences?

Eating insects is being increasingly touted as a sustainable solution to the protein demands of a growing world population.

While marketers face a seemingly momentous task in overcoming the disgust factor – a 2014 study into commercialising insects in the West was entitled ‘How to market the impossible’ – there are ways of making insects appear more palatable.

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The restaurant where a fly in the soup is a GOOD thing

The restaurant where a fly in the soup is a GOOD thing | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Grub Kitchen in Haverfordwest, South Wales, will be the UK's first restaurant to focus entirely on insect produce. Bugs of all types including grasshoppers and worms will be served.
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Insect-based dishes on menu at St George's Market - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

Insect-based dishes on menu at St George's Market - BelfastTelegraph.co.uk | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It might not be the most appealing snack for a weekend stroll round St George's Market - but we could all be indulging in these invertebrate treats in the future.
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Central Co-op's New Product Line: Bugs!

Central Co-op's New Product Line: Bugs! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Now that you’ve maybe managed to get some veggies mixed into your kid’s smoothies, how about adding nutrient-rich crickets or mealworm flour?   That’s what Central
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Hoxton’s pop-up answer to I’m A Celebrity will serve beetle larvae, meal worms, crickets and grasshoppers

Hoxton’s pop-up answer to I’m A Celebrity will serve beetle larvae, meal worms, crickets and grasshoppers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Beetle larvae, meal worms, crickets and grasshoppers are gracing the menu at Hoxton’s answer to the Bushtucker Trials next week.
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VIDEO: Can Eating Bugs Save The World?

VIDEO: Can Eating Bugs Save The World? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Candied sesame crickets are not the first ingredient most people would add to a stir fry. But for entomophagist and author Daniella Martin, cooking with bugs is a favorite treat. Martin stopped by HuffPost Live to share her recipes and to discuss why...
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This Week on Good Food: Soylent, Cricket Protein Bars, Beef Tongue Sashimi | Good Food

This Week on Good Food: Soylent, Cricket Protein Bars, Beef Tongue Sashimi | Good Food | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Evan Kleiman tries Soylent, Greg Sewitz discusses a protein bar made of crickets and Jonathan Gold reviews what he says is L.A.’s first true offal restaurant.
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Sonoma Valley Sun | Entomophagy and ice cold beer « Turning Stones

Sonoma Valley Sun | Entomophagy and ice cold beer « Turning Stones | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
George McKale is a practicing archaeologist and Sonoma’s City Historian. He has excavated throughout California ranging from Native American sites thousands of years old to Gold Rush era locations. His passion and specialty in archaeology is the study of human remains.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Entomophagy and ice cold beer

Posted on February 19, 2014 by George McKale

I like bugs but I don’t like them crawling on me.  In fact, when I find an insect on any part of my body, I shiver to the core of my soul. Many cultures throughout the world use insects for food.  When animals eat insects they are called insectivores.  When humans eat them it is known as Entomophagy.

Today, insects are eaten in virtually every continent. Entomophagy, though still practiced, was very popular in the distant past. In fact, insects may have played an important role in the diet of early humans.  To get a better understanding of this line of research, one must take a closer look at poop.  Archaeologists have a nicer term; we refer to fossilized poop as coprolites.

Coprolites are often found in caves and a quick look under the microscope reveals all kinds of...."

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Local business makes protein powder from bugs

Local business makes protein powder from bugs | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The ingredients for a protein bar can include the following: peanuts, fruit, soy and now — bugs.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Aaron Dossey, founder and sole employee of Athens-based All Things Bugs, is seeking to change the protein game with his patent-pending process that turns insects into a healthy powder ingredient.

Bugs are a good source of protein, higher than other animal products, and are more sustainable than larger animals. So, the idea of eating bugs, although foreign to Americans, could soon catch on, and Dossey wants to lead the way.

"This is a healthy product, starts as a clean product and it's sustainable,” he said.

Dossey said his product came about from a passion for entomology, the study of insects, a fascination that he has held since he was a boy.

"I would say I’ve always been kind of the kid of the outfield in tee ball looking at flowers and bees and stuff," Dossey said. "I always learned about plants and things and it particularly really caught on in high school when I had to do insect collection for honors zoology and biology."

Dossey continued his education in biochemistry at Oklahoma State University and received his PhD in biochemistry and molecular biology from the University of Florida. After what seemed+

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A year for eating dangerously

A year for eating dangerously | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Dining is an adventure in choice, so much so that the exotic
is now de rigueur. Still, are we ready for brain custard?
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Insects continue to hover on the periphery, making occasional appearances in fine dining establishments and even supermarkets. Diners seem largely unpersuaded, but the idea is not going to go away in 2014, given the enormous pressures on the environment and the obvious logic of using rich, copious, cheap protein flying and crawling all around us. Various South African peoples have been eating locusts and thongolifha stink bugs for centuries, though I admit I live with the contradiction of relishing prawns but stopping at crickets."

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This 3D Printing Company Makes Edible Cricket and Dung Beetle "Treats"

This 3D Printing Company Makes Edible Cricket and Dung Beetle "Treats" | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Yum?
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Hypothetical: A Portuguese designer creates a food source from primary ingredients that are in abundant global supply. It’s a high protein powder. It’s good for you and good for the environment. Do you eat it?

Here’s the catch: this superfood is made from the paste of ground-up dung beetles and crickets.

Here’s the other catch: this isn’t a hypothetical.

A Portuguese designer, Susan Soares, is using 3D printing technology to make insects more palatable.

There is a wholly rational argument for eating creepy-crawlies. The UN Food and Agriculture Organization believes bug eating is the right strategy to adopt; as the world’s population grows, a new food source is required, and bugs are already squirming around on every continent and in every climate. It makes sense to embrace entomophagy, the practice of raising insects as food, on a global scale."

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Food & Recipes | Boston Herald

Food & Recipes | Boston Herald | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Bugs — they’re what’s for dinner.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Bugs — they’re what’s for dinner.

Daniella Martin makes the case that dragonflies, mealworms, beetle grubs, crickets, grasshoppers and bee larvae belong on the menu in “Edible” (New Harvest, $23), in stores Tuesday.

“Most people in Western society are brainwashed about insects,” said the Minneapolis-based Martin.

What many Westerners see as creepy crawly nightmares, other cultures see as food. Martin has explored the insect cuisines of Mexico, Thailand, Japan and the burgeoning bug-friendly niches of Southern California and Austin, Texas. They are eaten raw, sauteed, and roasted, and even ground into flour for baking."

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