Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Edible insects are putting the bee in breakfast

Edible insects are putting the bee in breakfast | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
It’s time to get over the cringe-factor because edible insects are versatile, tasty and healthy to eat.  Edible insects could also become a crucial component in delivering food sustainably to the world’s ever growing population.
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New York woman prepares the perfect cicada pizza (VIDEO) 

New York woman prepares the perfect cicada pizza (VIDEO)  | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
How about a slice of pizza with cicada topping? One New York woman has unearthed some perfect pie recipes for the shrill bugs, which are returning from their underground hibernation to the Northeast skies for the first time in 17 years this summer.
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Cicadas set to descend on East Coast can be tasty dishes when well-prepared

Cicadas set to descend on East Coast can be tasty dishes when well-prepared | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
The stick-legged, buzzing and bug-eyed insects are coming — but you can do your part to exterminate cicadas: eat ‘em!
Billions of Brood II cicadas are set to hatch this spring, bringing a once every 17 years plague to most of the East Coast.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Shrimp and lobster eat garbage and they are the insects of the ocean,’ says cicada cook Jenna Jadin. ‘If we eat those without much afterthought, why not eat insects?’

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/cicada-cooking-pizza-tacos-jello-article-1.1314334#ixzz2QWuvOuHy";

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Could Crickets Solve the World's Malnutrition Problem? | IdeaFeed | Big Think

Could Crickets Solve the World's Malnutrition Problem? | IdeaFeed | Big Think | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
To help feed the world's malnourished, a team of students at McGill University, Montreal, are putting forth a plan meant to facilitate the production of edible insects on an industrial scale.
Ana C. Day's insight:

What's the Latest Development?

A team of students at McGill University, Montreal, are putting forth a plan meant to facilitate the production of edible insects on an industrial scale. "The idea is to distribute cricket-producing kits to the world's slums as a way of improving diets, and giving people more income. Families would eat what they needed, while selling the rest for processing into flour, and other products." Zev Thompson, one of the students, said: "We're proposing a factory to grind cricket-flour with corn, wheat or rice, whatever is local, and then creating very normal looking food that has an additional boost to it."

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Eco-Friendly Protein: Edible Bugs | WebEcoist

Eco-Friendly Protein: Edible Bugs | WebEcoist | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Though they are relegated to game show gross-out props in much of the West, bugs are quite eco-friendly protein sources.
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Sixteen Ways to Eat a Cicada: The Fine Art of Insect Cuisin , TIME.com

Sixteen Ways to Eat a Cicada: The Fine Art of Insect Cuisin , TIME.com | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cicadas are appearing in a variety of foods, including ice cream and cookies
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Waiter, What’s This Maggot Doing in My Soup?

Waiter, What’s This Maggot Doing in My Soup? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
As a boy growing up in rural Missouri, I was very interested in insects and ended up with a rather sizable collection of mounted specimens that I took to the local 4-H fair. Later, when I became a ...
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One man’s meat, another man’s poison - Nation | The Star Online

One man’s meat, another man’s poison - Nation | The Star Online | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

INSECTS, spiders and bugs are not halal and cannot be consumed by Muslims.

Ana C. Day's insight:

“You are obliged to eat food that is halal and good. There are good things that you can eat and there are bad things that you should avoid.

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Cicadas expected to emerge soon - News - Standard Speaker

Cicadas expected to emerge soon - News - Standard Speaker | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Ana C. Day's insight:

Cicadas will emerge this year and they could be making a racket soon in your neighborhood.

The noisy, flying insects, which surface periodically along the East Coast, are due for a 17-year appearance in parts of Northeastern Pennsylvania, according to Penn State Cooperative Extension.

"We will only know when they start to emerge how big the population will be," said Vincent Catrone, a forester at the extension office in West Pittston. "These are typical emergences. There will be pockets of them."

Concentrations are expected to surface in 17 counties, according to Penn State, including Luzerne, Carbon and Schuylkill.

After soil temperatures reach 64 degrees, cicadas usually emerge from May to July. Cicada nymphs burrow up from the earth, where they feed on plant root fluids, before shedding an exoskeleton and transforming to winged, 1.5-inch adults.

They do not sting, bite or harm crops or most trees.

But they are loud, clumsy and creepy.

"Anybody who hates insects will be freaked out because they are so big," Catrone said.

"People get the heebie-jeebies," added Daniel Townsend, Ph.D., a University of Scranton biology professor. "If you get a swarm, it's like the Alfred Hitchcock phenomenon."

Amorous male cicadas emit an ear-splitting clicking noise, which is a mating call.

For humans, it's a nuisance.

"Their decibel level can get pretty high," Catrone said.

"The sound is an amazing one," Townsend said. "If you get very many of them in one spot, it can be hard to carry on a conversation."

Cicadas provide a prime source of protein for many creatures, including birds, fish and some mammals.

"If you are a bird, it's a food fest," Catrone said.

When they take to the air, though, cicadas are among the klutzes of the insect world.

"They are not real adept at flight," said Greg Hoover, an entomologist at Penn State Extension.

Catrone said cicadas "bounce into houses, cars and people," but do no harm.

Detractors can take comfort in cicadas' short life span. They die off within weeks after reproducing and are not expected to re-emerge in the state until 2016.

Pennsylvania has eight broods of 17-year cicadas, said Hoover. Brood II cicadas will surface in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Connecticut and parts of New York, Virginia and North Carolina this season.

"It's the longest-lived insect in North America," he said.

Way too long, for people with a fear of insects.

jhaggerty@timesshamrock.com

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This utility model claims an edible insect protein powder and producing... - IP.com

The invention claims an edible insect protein powder. It mainly takes of mint and periostracum cicadae chinese shrimp it is also called the flour weevil as...
Ana C. Day's insight:

"The invention claims an edible insect protein powder. It mainly takes of mint and periostracum cicadae chinese shrimp it is also called the flour weevil as follows locust and silkworm pupa and other edible insect as representative of the insect. At home and abroad market the developed products in mainly includes special animal feed and edible insect table dish and a certain quantity of insects material are used as pet feed. To the edible insect protein powder home and abroad and so on is no report about both. The purpose of this invention is to develop an edible insect protein powder the edible insect protein powder a production method and application."

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Edible Insects: Gross-Out or Global Food Solution?

Edible Insects: Gross-Out or Global Food Solution? | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Cultural attitudes toward food tend to change slowly. But as we struggle to feed a growing population, insects present a remarkably plentiful source of nutrition.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"ndeed, novelty and fundtemraising are far from the only motivations for broadening one’s culinary horizons. Today there are a billion hungry people on the planet. That number is going to grow, and the cost of food is already soaring. Over the past year, real food prices (adjusted for inflation) have risen by 33 percent, and according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, a further 20 to 30 percent increase is expected in the next ten years."

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Locusts fit for a plague / Entomophagy

Locusts fit for a plague / Entomophagy | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

I speak of a whole new agricultural world. Come with me now into the exciting world of entomophagy. Or, insect eating. In 80% of the world's nations, people are piling into them. We Westerners, with our delicious beef and succulent pork, are the minority.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"

As sophisticated as our food production has become, insects are so bound into the food chain, you can't eliminate them. They're in your grains, your vegetables, your delicious fresh farm produce. And you didn't feel a thing.

Wageningen University in the Netherlands is looking towards this new horizon for us all. It has some very impressive numbers."

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LAOS: Insect farms run into trouble

LAOS: Insect farms run into trouble | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Promoting consumption of edible insects in Laos may help boost protein-anaemic diets, say health experts trying to create regional health standards for insect production, harvesting and consumption.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Scheduled to end in April 2013, the project aims to provide poor households with an affordable, culturally-acceptable, protein-rich food complement. It has trained 120 farmers to breed house crickets, weaver ants and palm weevils (common edible insects of choice among Laotians), as well as mealworms which had only been used as animal feed but FAO now wants to introduce as human food."

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15 insects you won't believe are edible

15 insects you won't believe are edible | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What tastes like peanut butter? Or soft-shell crab? Or cinnamon? Why, grubs, scorpions and stinkbugs, of course. Find out why insects and spiders are just another food group in most parts of the world.
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