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Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
Insects as a protein alternative and solution to our world's food crisis.
Curated by Ana C. Day
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Critter Bitters: Insect-Based Cocktails from Julia Plevin and Lucy Knops | Products of Design

Critter Bitters: Insect-Based Cocktails from Julia Plevin and Lucy Knops | Products of Design | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
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Socialism - the solution to the food crisis

Socialism - the solution to the food crisis | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Seventy-four days is all that stands between mankind and starvation — the length of time the world’s food reserves would feed humanity before disappearing. From 1986 to 2001, the world held an average of 107 days’ worth of grain in storage. But from 2002 to 2011, the average dropped to just 74 days.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"It is forecasted that mankind will be trading beef burgers, steaks and sausages for versions made from insects such as caterpillars, grasshoppers and beetles. Morgaine Gaye, a food futurologist proposed changing the term “insects” to “mini-livestock” to make it sound more palatable. In Asia such protein is readily available in the food markets. "

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Why Insects Should Be in Your Diet | The Scientist Magazine®

Why Insects Should Be in Your Diet | The Scientist Magazine® | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
Because of their high protein and fat content and their reproductive efficiency, insects hold great promise for thwarting an impending global food crisis.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"In summary, insects hold great potential to contribute to global food security. They present a substantial opportunity to provide much-needed animal-sourced nutrients, particularly to the developing world. The potential for insects to contribute to human well-being and sustainability is dwarfed only by the amazing diversity and adaptability demonstrated by these magnificent creatures in nature." 

Aaron T. Dossey is a biochemist, entomologist, and founder and owner of All Things Bugs, a biotech R&D company dedicated to insect-based applications including insect-based foods.  

@AllThingsBugs
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Edible insects will replace meat as standard fare says researchers

Edible insects will replace meat as standard fare says researchers | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
DUTCH student Walinka van Tol inspects the worm protruding from a half-eaten chocolate praline she's holding, steels herself with a shrug, then pops it into her mouth.
Ana C. Day's insight:

According to professor Van Huis, about 500 types of insects are eaten in Mexico, 250 in Africa and 180 in China and other parts of Asia - mostly they are a delicacy.

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Scientists 'grow' edible insects in Costa Rica

Scientists 'grow' edible insects in Costa Rica | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
he day when restaurants will serve garlic grasshoppers or beetle larva skewers is getting closer in Costa Rica, where scientists are "growing" insects for human consumption.
Ana C. Day's insight:

Entomologist Manuel Zumbado's research into this alternative food source is inspired by practices in Africa, where insects have long been part of people's diet.

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Harvesting Insects Can Help in World Food Crisis | NowPublic Photo Archives

Harvesting Insects Can Help in World Food Crisis | NowPublic Photo Archives | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

It doesn't take long for a food crisis to scar a generation of children with long-lasting brain and physical damage.  It is urgent people get access to essential proteins, and one source that can help in crises, is edible insects. There are many projects around the world working to make insects a palatable and sustainable food source for the future.

Continue reading at NowPublic.com: Harvesting Insects Can Help in World Food Crisis | NowPublic Photo Archives http://www.nowpublic.com/world/harvesting-insects-can-help-world-food-crisis-0#ixzz2HDZANBvv

Ana C. Day's insight:

For many years it was a given that the world's problem was not a lack of food, but that it was unfairly shared. But as the switch to biofuels gathers pace, farmland is being diverted away from growing food for people, to food for fuel.

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Chefs from world-renowned restaurant cook cockroach - Sowetan LIVE

Chefs from world-renowned restaurant cook cockroach - Sowetan LIVE | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
In their latest attempt to convince squeamish Western palates that insects are edible food sources, Danish chefs from a culinary
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Scientists have long been touting insects as a protein-packed meat alternative that could help meet the world’s growing food demand.

While the practice of eating insects, or entomophagy, may be unsettling for Western palates, the UN says that different species of beetles, ants, bees, grasshoppers and crickets are eaten in 29 countries across Asia, 23 countries in the Americas, and 36 countries in Africa.

In Thailand alone, 200 different insect species are consumed and are commonly sold as street snacks throughout the country.

According to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization, some insects contain twice the protein of raw meat and fish, while others, particularly in their larval stage, are also rich in fat, vitamins and minerals"

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Solving the Global Food Crisis – Agriculture’s Amazing Future!

Solving the Global Food Crisis – Agriculture’s Amazing Future! | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
What the next generation will eat is one of the biggest unanswered questions facing mankind.
Ana C. Day's insight:

"Scientists believe they have a solution to the food crisis, but it may mean changing your taste buds. Some forecast that mankind will be trading beef burgers, steaks and sausages for versions made from insects such as caterpillars, grasshoppers and dung beetles. Morgaine Gaye, a “food futurologist,” proposed changing the term “insects” to “mini-livestock” to make it more palatable for the masses (BBC).

This may seem like a foreign concept, but the Netherlands is already beginning to implement it: “The Dutch government is putting serious money into getting insects into mainstream diets. It recently invested one million euros…into research and to prepare legislation governing insect farms” (ibid.). But most throughout Western society are still too squeamish about replacing their cheeseburgers with “beetleburgers” and would not be fooled by the “mini-livestock” label."

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Locusts fit for a plague / Entomophagy

Locusts fit for a plague / Entomophagy | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

I speak of a whole new agricultural world. Come with me now into the exciting world of entomophagy. Or, insect eating. In 80% of the world's nations, people are piling into them. We Westerners, with our delicious beef and succulent pork, are the minority.

Ana C. Day's insight:

"

As sophisticated as our food production has become, insects are so bound into the food chain, you can't eliminate them. They're in your grains, your vegetables, your delicious fresh farm produce. And you didn't feel a thing.

Wageningen University in the Netherlands is looking towards this new horizon for us all. It has some very impressive numbers."

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The future of food: algae, insects and lab-grown meat

The future of food: algae, insects and lab-grown meat | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it
How can we feed the 2.5 billion more people - an extra China and India - likely to be alive in 2050?
Ana C. Day's insight:

The UN says we will have to nearly double our food production and governments say we should adopt new technologies and avoid waste.


Locusts, grasshoppers, spiders, wasps, worms, ants and beetles are not on most European or US menus but at least 1,400 species are eaten across Africa, Latin America and Asia. Now, with rising food prices and worldwide land shortages, it could be just a matter of time before insect farms set up in Britain.

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Epicurean Explorers Bring Edible Insects Into The Mainstream - PSFK

Epicurean Explorers Bring Edible Insects Into The Mainstream - PSFK | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Edible is a UK-based online storefront bringing unique and unusual delicacies from around the world to Western cultures in a palatable way.

Ana C. Day's insight:

All products are manufactured under strict hygiene standards, fully complying with all UK and European Union Community guidelines on food standards and safety.

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Moderately Certain: The Foods of Tomorrow

Moderately Certain: The Foods of Tomorrow | Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food | Scoop.it

Leaving no stone unturned, we can’t forget the obvious option: Insects! The human population is easily dwarfed by insects, both in biomass and numbers. Eating insects, or Entomophagy, is already widely practiced across the world (Mexico has a popular Grasshopper taco.)

Ana C. Day's insight:

"Compared to our current livestock, insect farms require far less land, are far more efficient at converting plants into edible meat and emit fewer greenhouse gases. They are rich in proteins, low in fat and high in calcium and iron. They can even flourish on waste and paper, offering an auxiliary cleaning service."

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