MarkLogic - Enterprise NoSQL Database
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MarkLogic - Enterprise NoSQL Database
Next generation big data, requires a next generation database
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Linked Data: Best Thing to Happen to Semantic Web | MarkLogic

Linked Data: Best Thing to Happen to Semantic Web | MarkLogic | MarkLogic - Enterprise NoSQL Database | Scoop.it
Visit MarkLogic.com to read Linked Data: Best Thing to Happen to Semantic Web.
Dominic Spitz's insight:

(By Philip Fennell)

 

As a result of the keynote speech at the MarkLogic World 2012 conference I blogged a short piece for O’Reilly entitled “Linked Data Underpins the value of Big Data” where I aired the view that it was the links within, and externally between, datasets that were the real value in Big Data.

 

The increasing interest in Linked Data, and the Semantic Web in general, saw MarkLogic announce, at MarkLogic World 2013, that it was releasing Semantic Web functionality in MarkLogic 7. The 2014 MarkLogic World conference this April will be showcasing how far we are on that path, where we intend to go and how users of MarkLogic are already delivering new applications and services based on these technologies.

 

An interesting question is; how did we get to this point? By that I mean, how did an apparently niche technology, the Semantic Web, which has been in existence for over 14 years, gain such momentum only relatively recently?

 

Well, the underlying technologies of the Semantic Web are the foundation for a web of data, designed as a web-scale technology that utilizes the features that have made the existing web of documents a reality. But, for many years the Semantic Web was seen as a technology looking for a solution. Then, in this context, around 2006/7 the term ‘Linked Data’ was coined and the conversation changed from one of technologies to one of finding solutions to problems:

 

I want to link my data with publically available data to enhance its value.I need to make data integration a much less painful process.I’d like to utilize the relationships (links) between data to learn more about them.I have many disparate data sources that I need to link and query in a consistent and federated way.I need my data to be as agile as my software development processes.If I could publish some of my data openly, so others could link to it, I could attract more customers to my products and services.

These are all problems that organizations have struggled with over the years and there are real solutions to these problems within Linked Data and the Semantic Web.  The Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a data model that is able to respond quickly and easily to change – agile by definition. OWL Ontologies define the rules that govern the interpretation of concepts and relationships that make Linked Data integration a reality. The vast array of publically available datasets can help you enhance the value of your data. The Five Stars of Linked Open Data provide the principles and framework for publishing open data.

 

Since 2007, interest in Linked Data has grown consistently as organizations begin to understand how the Semantic Web technologies can be used to enhance services, enrich products, improve user journeys and streamline internal processes. Join us at MarkLogic World 2014 to discover how you can utilize these technologies to solve real-world problems with MarkLogic. (And if you come a day earlier, we are running a free, day-long, instructor-led course on Using MarkLogic Semantics.)

 

From time to time I will be writing on these pages about the continued evolution of the Semantic Web — and its cohort, Linked Data.

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If I haven't heard of it it's probably NoSQL! | Bloor

It's all too easy to think that all noSQL vendors fall into the same camp. MarkLogic is a notable exception.
Dominic Spitz's insight:

There are a huge and ridiculous number of NoSQL databases on the market and the truth is that there is not enough market out there to sustain them all. This means that a bunch of them will eventually go belly up. This is especially true bearing in mind that many of these companies are open source and have miniscule numbers of paying customers. Of course, this is the gamble that the VCs take but I think there are likely to be a lot more losers than winners. On the other hand the winners may win big.

 

But there's another consequence of this plethora of suppliers that most of us have never heard of. The thought process goes something like this: "I've never heard of you … oh, you're a NoSQL vendor … in that case I'll wish you the best of British … goodbye". Only, that approach can be a mistake: because there are NoSQL companies that you may not have heard of that actually do have a sound business model and a decent customer base. Of course, they are the exception to the rule but they do exist.

 

I was reminded of this today when I got a press release from MarkLogic (they've introduced a free developer license for their Enterprise Edition and also announced a Mongo2MarkLogic converter). I meant to write about them last year but, what with one thing and another, didn't get around to it. So, what makes MarkLogic different from your ordinary, average run-of-the-mill NoSQL vendor?

 

Well, first, they were around before the whole trend for NoSQL became fashionable - the company was founded in 2001. Second, they have never been an open source vendor. Third, they have over 350 real, live, actual paying enterprise customers (many of them major companies) and, perhaps most importantly, the product is ACID compliant. That seems like a contradiction in terms doesn't it? NoSQL and ACID compliant!

 

As might be suggested by the Mongo converter that the company has just introduced, MarkLogic is especially focused on unstructured data. Thus, for example, the BBC built its web site for the London Olympics last year based on MarkLogic. Warner Brothers uses the product as catalogue storage for the trailers it makes for its various movies. In both case the product's integrated search engine is the icing on top of the database. Actually, it's a federated search engine and it has more conventional uses as well: for instance, one global investment bank is using it to establish its risk position across geographies.

 

The underlying architecture of MarkLogic is XML-based but the company has the product running on top of HDFS in its labs though this is not generally available as yet. It is possible to archive data to HDFS environments and MarkLogic has policy definition capabilities provided for ILM (information lifecycle management) purposes. You can still search across the archived HDFS environment using the MarkLogic search engine. As one might expect from an XML-based technology, access may be made via XQuery but there is also support for JSON and SQL access as well as a REST API.

 

So: not all NoSQL products and vendors are by any means equal. Indeed, MarkLogic tends to compete with relational databases and technology rather than other NoSQL suppliers. And that, perhaps, proves the point that it is dangerous to tar all NoSQL vendors with the same brush. Because MarkLogic is clearly an exception.

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Adam Fowler's curator insight, May 3, 2013 9:05 AM

Great piece of research that makes the point that not all NoSQL databases are equal. Quite the opposite infact.

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It's the Shape, Not the Size - of the Data - that Matters

It's the Shape, Not the Size - of the Data - that Matters | MarkLogic - Enterprise NoSQL Database | Scoop.it
Community Blogs, comments and opinions by industry professionals
Dominic Spitz's insight:

Data is at the center of most challenges facing our industry today, with business drivers such as new regulations, aggregated risk management, and deep customer insight all having critical data management implications. The term Big Data has become a common way to describe this, and while some of these challenges are associated with large volumes, it isn't really the size of the data that's at issue. I'd argue that at this point we know how to handle large volumes: use shared-nothing architectures that scale horizontally on commodity hardware.  The trickier problem has to do with a different "V" of Big Data - variety - and it is that aspect that I'd like to focus on (.......)

 

http://www.finextra.com/Community/fullblog.aspx?blogid=7590

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Big Data -- Ready, Set, Go! New SGI(R) DataRaptor(TM) With MarkLogic(R) Database is Having Big Data for Lunch

Big Data -- Ready, Set, Go! New SGI(R) DataRaptor(TM) With MarkLogic(R) Database is Having Big Data for Lunch | MarkLogic - Enterprise NoSQL Database | Scoop.it

MarkLogic Corporation, provider of the enterprise NoSQL database, and SGI (Nasdaq:SGI), the trusted leader in technical computing and provider of Hadoop® Big Data solutions, today announced the SGI® DataRaptor™ with MarkLogic® database. An integrated and optimized hardware and software solution, SGI DataRaptor is designed to make it faster and easier for organizations to generate reliable, scalable and secure Big Data results.

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