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Hattie effect size list - 195 Influences Related To Achievement 

Hattie effect size list - 195 Influences Related To Achievement  | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
John Hattie developed a way of ranking various influences in different meta-analyses related to learning and achievement according to their effect sizes. In his ground-breaking study “Visible Learning” he ranked 138 influences that are related to learning outcomes from very positive effects to very negative effects. Hattie found that the average effect size of all the interventions he studied was 0.40. Therefore he decided to judge the success of influences relative to this ‘hinge point’, in order to find an answer to the question “What works best in education?”

Hattie studied six areas that contribute to learning: the student, the home, the school, the curricula, the teacher, and teaching and learning approaches. But Hattie did not only provide a list of the relative effects of different influences on student achievement. He also tells the story underlying the data. He found that the key to making a difference was making teaching and learning visible. He further explained this story in his book “Visible learning for teachers“.

John Hattie updated his list of 138 effects to 150 effects in Visible Learning for Teachers (2011), and more recently to a list of 195 effects in The Applicability of Visible Learning to Higher Education (2015). His research is now based on nearly 1200 meta-analyses – up from the 800 when Visible Learning came out in 2009. According to Hattie the story underlying the data has hardly changed over time even though some effect sizes were updated and we have some new entries at the top, at the middle, and at the end of the list.

Below you can find an updated version of our first visualization of effect sizes related to student achievement. You can compare the entries from Visible Learning (red), Visible Learning for Teachers (green) and Hattie 2015 (blue). Hattie constantly updates this list with more meta studies. Here is a backup of our first visualisation of 138 effects.

Via John Evans
David Santibáñez Gómez's insight:
Estimaciones de logro del profesor, eficacia colectiva entre docentes, notas autogeneradas, programas basados en Piaget y programas basados en cambio conceptual serían los 5 factores más determinantes en el aprendizaje, de acuerdo al último trabajo de "Tamaño del efecto" de Hattie. El conocimiento del contenido conceptual es uno de los factores con menor tamaño de efecto.
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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, December 5, 3:35 AM
Het voordeel van deze lijst is dat ik voortaan niet meer hoef te stil te staan bij de (figuurlijke) vraag of de onderwijswereld nu rond is of plat. Die zekerheid spaart veel tijd uit. Die kunnen we gebruiken want er ligt nog veel werk op de plank. 
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How to Make Your Day Super Productive?

How to Make Your Day Super Productive? | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
We all have hard days. Tasks seem enormous and deadlines are stressful. However, you still have to make the most out of each day and finish everything in time. How can you make everything work? What are the tips on how to be productive and do everything on time? In this article, you will find everything you need to know about this.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Productivity

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 23, 8:17 AM
We all have hard days. Tasks seem enormous and deadlines are stressful. However, you still have to make the most out of each day and finish everything in time. How can you make everything work? What are the tips on how to be productive and do everything on time? In this article, you will find everything you need to know about this.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Productivity

 

 

Adele Taylor's curator insight, November 23, 3:54 PM

Another good read! 

Everyone battles with time, but these are some easy tips to do if you have self discipline to do them...

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 25, 3:46 AM

Lucid post, presenting interesting data. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in people management, please visit http://blogwgs.tumblr.com/  

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Want to live longer? Read a book -WeForum.org

Want to live longer? Read a book -WeForum.org | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Could a bit of light reading every day add years to your life?

A new study by Yale University found that reading books was positively correlated with increased lifespan -- people who read books lived for around two years longer than those who didn’t.

Via John Evans
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The Most Visual Science Textbook You've Never Seen | #Evolution #NationalGeographic #STEM

The Most Visual Science Textbook You've Never Seen | #Evolution #NationalGeographic #STEM | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Evolution happens so slowly, it's hard to see up close. Now you can.

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 16, 5:49 PM
Evolution happens so slowly, it's hard to see up close. Now you can.

 

 

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Infographic of the Week: 27 Ways to Reflect on Your Teaching | #Reflecting

Infographic of the Week: 27 Ways to Reflect on Your Teaching | #Reflecting | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
The beginning of a new year typically presents individuals with a designated time and opportunity to reflect upon the events of the past 365 days, to cherish the unforgettable moments, to learn from mistakes or disappointments, and most importantly, to set goals for the next chapter in this adventure we call life. In education, we call these types of behaviors “reflective practice”, or the manner in which teachers step back and evaluate the learning environment.

 

As in any other profession, we assess what was successful, what didn’t work as planned and/or what needs to be adjusted the next time—all in an effort to improve our craft.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=reflection

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/06/01/update-twitter-chats-what-to-do-better/

 

https://www.pinterest.com/swirlz42/mia-macmeekin/

 

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 12, 11:17 AM
The beginning of a new year typically presents individuals with a designated time and opportunity to reflect upon the events of the past 365 days, to cherish the unforgettable moments, to learn from mistakes or disappointments, and most importantly, to set goals for the next chapter in this adventure we call life. In education, we call these types of behaviors “reflective practice”, or the manner in which teachers step back and evaluate the learning environment.

 

As in any other profession, we assess what was successful, what didn’t work as planned and/or what needs to be adjusted the next time—all in an effort to improve our craft.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=reflection

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/06/01/update-twitter-chats-what-to-do-better/

 

 

https://www.pinterest.com/swirlz42/mia-macmeekin/

 

Martha Bongiorno's curator insight, November 14, 9:48 AM
With teachers ever increasing to-do list, it's not unheard of to put our reflections on the back burner. This is one of the most important parts of our profession, and we need to make time for it. Here are some ideas on how to reflect!
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50 Ways Google Can Help You Become A Better Teacher

50 Ways Google Can Help You Become A Better Teacher | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
While Apple products are known for their integration in classrooms, increasingly Google is the choice for schools and districts looking for something organized, useful, and inexpensive that’s available on tablet, laptop, Chromebooks, desktop, smartphone, and more. 



In fact, the sheer diversity of Google products might make them a more natural fit in the classroom in lieu of the iPad’s gravity. Below we’ve listed 50 ways teachers can get started using Google in the classroom.

Via John Evans
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 5, 11:10 AM
Take advantage of the diversity of Google's resources.
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25 Reading Strategies That Work In Every Content Area

25 Reading Strategies That Work In Every Content Area | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Reading is reading. By understanding that letters make sounds, we can blend those sounds together to make whole sounds that symbolize meaning we can all exchange with one another.

Without getting too Platonic about it all, reading doesn’t change simply because you’re reading a text from another content area. Only sometimes it does.

Science content can often by full of jargon, research citations, and odd text features.

Social Studies content can be an interesting mix of itemized information, and traditional paragraphs/imagery.

Literature? Well, that depends on if you mean the flexible form of poetry, the enduring structure of a novel, or emerging digital literature that combines multiple modalities to tell a story. (Inanimate Alice, for example.)

Via John Evans
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, August 14, 9:36 AM
This is a great resource.
Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 2, 7:59 AM
I see the match of strategies to content area an important consideration. I also see each reading strategy as a mini lesson for the reading workshop followed by independent practice and application. Some Close Reading strategies could be added to this list.
Cheryl Turner's curator insight, November 2, 1:52 PM
another good site for comprehension strategies is adlit.org. 
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Leadership and The Art of Effective Listening

Leadership and The Art of Effective Listening | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it

There is no leadership, personal or organizational, without listening. In fact, ability to truly listen (and not just hear) is the foundation of having a conversation, building trust, influencing others, resolving conflicts, driving your vision, building relationships, implementing change and...

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=listening

 


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Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, October 31, 7:45 AM

Very interesting topic written attractively and with great content. I believe that
the relevance of this issue will generate more author's posts, which I will follow
assiduously. For those who speaks Portuguese or Spanish I also recommend the
site http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com to read about innovation and business trends.

Gonzalo Moreno's curator insight, November 1, 8:44 AM
Leading starts with listening. Key idea, specially for the younger...
Brad Merrick's curator insight, November 2, 4:50 PM
Being able to listen with focus and empathy is key, whereby those in our care feel supported and heard. In a world where everyone is so busy and time often seems to be the commodity that we have the least of, this diagram really serves to remind us that we need to listen constructively, suggest skilfully and try to understand the emotion of those we are engaging with in all that we do. Purposeful listening rather than just hearing is key.
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5 Strategies For Teaching Students To Use Metacognition | #LEARNing2LEARN 

5 Strategies For Teaching Students To Use Metacognition | #LEARNing2LEARN  | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Metacognitive skills enable students to regulate their thinking and to become independent learners who can enhance their school and life experiences. Wherever the ambitions of our youth lead them, they will benefit from being able to solve problems creatively, think analytically, communicate effectively, and collaborate with others. As we conducted research for our latest book, we found that studies simultaneously indicate that metacognition is one of the most important skillsets students need, yet often is not taught.

When students are metacognitive, they can take a step back and observe their thinking. Sometimes this is called the reflective process. When using this approach, they might ask themselves questions like these: What is the problem to be solved? How should I solve the problem? How well am I doing? How well did I do? How can I do it better the next time? The metaphor we developed as a way to help educators teach metacognition to children and youth across grade levels is that of “driving your brain.”

Teaching students to drive their brains and become self-directed learners can be compared to driver’s education, in which students receive explicit instruction on how to guide their thinking, when to slow down, when it’s okay to speed up, and how to avoid wrong turns.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Metacognition

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 25, 5:01 AM
Metacognitive skills enable students to regulate their thinking and to become independent learners who can enhance their school and life experiences. Wherever the ambitions of our youth lead them, they will benefit from being able to solve problems creatively, think analytically, communicate effectively, and collaborate with others. As we conducted research for our latest book, we found that studies simultaneously indicate that metacognition is one of the most important skillsets students need, yet often is not taught.

When students are metacognitive, they can take a step back and observe their thinking. Sometimes this is called the reflective process. When using this approach, they might ask themselves questions like these: What is the problem to be solved? How should I solve the problem? How well am I doing? How well did I do? How can I do it better the next time? The metaphor we developed as a way to help educators teach metacognition to children and youth across grade levels is that of “driving your brain.”

Teaching students to drive their brains and become self-directed learners can be compared to driver’s education, in which students receive explicit instruction on how to guide their thinking, when to slow down, when it’s okay to speed up, and how to avoid wrong turns.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Metacognition

 

 

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Why use rubrics? (Infographic)

Why use rubrics? (Infographic) | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
This infographic gives you 9 ways to use rubrics in the classroom.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=rubric

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 18, 6:20 AM
This infographic gives you 9 ways to use rubrics in the classroom.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=rubric

 

 

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, October 19, 5:56 AM

Post very interesting, revealing some aspects that I did not know about infographics. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish, more about education improvement in business can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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9 Simple Steps that Inspire Inquiry-Based Learning in Science by Carole Wright

9 Simple Steps that Inspire Inquiry-Based Learning in Science by Carole Wright | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
By Carole Wright

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, October 3, 8:23 AM
 I was a "Writing in Science" practitioner but this model makes sense to me for Inquiry Based Projects. It would certainly mesh well with what happened in our K-4 classrooms, and provide a well timed alternative.
Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, October 3, 11:43 AM

Touches on all we care about for the 4Cs of 21st century learning and also incorporates the 5Es of scientific inquiry. Beautiful.

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5 Must Read Books On The Science of Learning

5 Must Read Books On The Science of Learning | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Learning is a complex cognitive phenomena that has been and is still the central theme of a wide variety of scientific studies. The overarching question ‘how we learn what we learn’ intrigued scientists across different disciplines and generated tons of literature on the topic. Informative insights coming out of these studies have not only demystified the workings of human cognition but have also shaped pedagogy and teaching methodology in unprecedented ways (e.g. multiple intelligence theory and learning styles). In this month's Books for Teachers, we are sharing with you five popular books on the topic of learning. You may want to bookmark and save them to read in your upcoming vacation. Enjoy

Via John Evans
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, September 27, 10:46 AM
Old time technology called writing and reading offers some food for thought with these books.
Virgínia Mareco's comment, September 27, 4:46 PM
http://booksliteraryreviews.blogspot.pt/2016/07/the-book-on-mediums-o-livros-dos.html
Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, September 27, 11:33 PM
If you have some spare time (!) and are looking for some professional reading, then this list will be helpful.
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On Live TV BBC Journalist Shows Coca-Cola President How Much Sugar Is In Their Drink

On Live TV BBC Journalist Shows Coca-Cola President How Much Sugar Is In Their Drink | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
We consume so much sugar on a daily basis, most of which is not even real, natural, or organic, and it’s probably one of the worst possible things we could be putting in our bodies. Sugar has a number of detrimental health effects and leads to many diseases, including diabetes and cancer, among many others. […]

Via EFL SMARTblog
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Open Knowledge Maps - A visual interface to the world's scientific knowledge | #Research #Science

Open Knowledge Maps - A visual interface to the world's scientific knowledge | #Research #Science | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
We are building a visual interface to the world's scientific knowledge to change the way we discover research.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Research

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, December 2, 4:21 PM
We are building a visual interface to the world's scientific knowledge to change the way we discover research.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Research

 

 

Victoria Marín's curator insight, December 6, 9:01 AM
Interesting open project aimed at visually mapping scientific knowledge.
Frances's curator insight, December 7, 7:31 AM
WOW!
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6 Techniques for Building Reading Skills—in Any Subject

6 Techniques for Building Reading Skills—in Any Subject | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it

"As avid lovers of literature, teachers often find themselves wanting to impart every bit of knowledge about a well-loved text to their students. And this is not just an ELA issue—other disciplines also often focus on the content of a text. However, teaching reading skills in English classes and across the disciplines is an almost guaranteed way to help students retain content. Unfortunately, the tendency to focus on the content is a real enemy to the ultimate goal of building reading skills.


Without a repertoire of reading strategies that can be applied to any text, students are being shortchanged in their education. In order to teach students to read effectively, teachers must be sure that they are not simply suppliers of information on a particular text but also instructors of techniques to build reading skills. Here are some ideas on how to incorporate reading skills lessons into a curriculum."


Via John Evans
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 21, 9:37 AM
Excellent advice and I envision these strategies being used daily in any subject as "go to's" by students. I am an advocate of several of these strategies, especially, Close Reading. 
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4 Secrets to Learning Anything, According to Neuroscience

4 Secrets to Learning Anything, According to Neuroscience | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
The future of work is all about innovation and agility. We have to be prepared for ever-changing circumstances, and that means being open to learning new things.

Learning is no longer something we just do in schools. We can't rely on just the skillset we knew when we entered the workforce--that will guarantee career stagnation.

 

NLI has recently been exploring how to make ideas stick. Through their research, they created a model outlining four key conditions for effective learning: Attention, Generation, Emotion and Spacing (AGES).

 

Here's a quick overview of the AGES model:

 

Attention: When you learn, maintain a single focus having complete and undivided attention.

Generation: Listening isn't enough. Heighten the likelihood of memory retention by doing something with the information you're learning. Create a situation that will make this information meaningful.

Emotion: Strong emotions lead to strong memories. Look for ways to build an emotional connection to what you're learning.

Spacing: In order to grow memory, you need a break in between learning.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/

 


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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, November 21, 4:46 AM
Vier dingen om te onthouden. Klinkt simpel. Is het valse eenvoud of bemoeilijken we het leren zelf te veel?
davidconover's curator insight, November 21, 10:44 AM
The future model of school work is all about innovation and agility.
 
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 22, 4:27 AM

Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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How to undo your classroom management mistakes

How to undo your classroom management mistakes | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
I’ll tell you my personal philosophy on this. It’s NEVER too late to change something that’s not working. Not in your classroom, and not in your life.

You don’t have to wait for next year and an entirely new group of kids. You can–and should–modify your procedures, expectations, and teaching strategies ANY time they are not effective, at ANY time during the school year.

Via Mel Riddile
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The Teenage Brain Is Wired to Learn—So Make Sure Your Students Know It

The Teenage Brain Is Wired to Learn—So Make Sure Your Students Know It | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Thanks to the wonders of neuroplasticity, adolescents are primed to improve their performance in school—and beyond. Here’s how to help.

 


Adolescence is an exciting time as teenagers become increasingly independent, begin to look forward to their lives beyond high school, and undergo many physical, emotional, and cognitive changes. In that last category, teenagers can learn to take charge of their developing brains and steer their thinking in positive and productive directions toward future college and career success.


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Harnessing the Incredible Learning Potential of the Adolescent Brain | #LEARNing2LEARN #Research

Harnessing the Incredible Learning Potential of the Adolescent Brain | #LEARNing2LEARN #Research | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
“[Adolescence is] a stage of life when we can really thrive, but we need to take advantage of the opportunity,” said Temple University neuroscientist Laurence Steinberg at a Learning and the Brain conference in Boston. Steinberg has spent his career studying how the adolescent brain develops and believes there is a fundamental disconnect between the popular characterizations of adolescents and what’s really going on in their brains.

Because the brain is still developing during adolescence, it has incredible plasticity. It’s akin to the first five years of life, when a child’s brain is growing and developing new pathways all the time in response to experiences. Adult brains are somewhat plastic as well — otherwise they wouldn’t be able to learn new things — but “brain plasticity in adulthood involves minor changes to existing circuits, not the wholesale development of new ones or elimination of others,” Steinberg said.

 

The adolescent brain is exquisitely sensitive to experience,” Steinberg said. “It is like the recording device is turned up to a different level of sensitivity.” That’s why humans tend to remember even the most mundane events from adolescence much better than even important events that took place later in life. It also means adolescence could be an extremely important window for learning that sticks. Steinberg notes this window is also lengthening as scientists observe the onset of puberty happening earlier and young people taking on adult roles later in life. Between these two factors, one biological and one social, adolescence researchers now generally say the period lasts 15 years between the ages of 10 and 25.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 

Use #Andragogy UP from 11 years:

 

 https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/andragogy-adult-teaching-how-to-teach-ict/

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, November 3, 9:55 AM
[Adolescence is] a stage of life when we can really thrive, but we need to take advantage of the opportunity,” said Temple University neuroscientist Laurence Steinberg at a Learning and the Brain conference in Boston. Steinberg has spent his career studying how the adolescent brain develops and believes there is a fundamental disconnect between the popular characterizations of adolescents and what’s really going on in their brains.

Because the brain is still developing during adolescence, it has incredible plasticity. It’s akin to the first five years of life, when a child’s brain is growing and developing new pathways all the time in response to experiences. Adult brains are somewhat plastic as well — otherwise they wouldn’t be able to learn new things — but “brain plasticity in adulthood involves minor changes to existing circuits, not the wholesale development of new ones or elimination of others,” Steinberg said.

 

The adolescent brain is exquisitely sensitive to experience,” Steinberg said. “It is like the recording device is turned up to a different level of sensitivity.” That’s why humans tend to remember even the most mundane events from adolescence much better than even important events that took place later in life. It also means adolescence could be an extremely important window for learning that sticks. Steinberg notes this window is also lengthening as scientists observe the onset of puberty happening earlier and young people taking on adult roles later in life. Between these two factors, one biological and one social, adolescence researchers now generally say the period lasts 15 years between the ages of 10 and 25.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 

Use #Andragogy UP from 11 years:

 

 https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/andragogy-adult-teaching-how-to-teach-ict/

 

 

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 5, 2:44 AM

Useful post, presenting an interesting vision of the theme. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish I also recommend the site http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, November 5, 7:04 AM
The problem is that many high schools confuse “challenging work” with “amount of work.”
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15 Questions to Replace “How Was School Today?” - @Edutopia

15 Questions to Replace “How Was School Today?” - @Edutopia | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it

"How many times have you asked your child, “How was school today?” and been frustrated by the lack of response? As a parent, I’m guilty of asking my son this question all the time, even though I usually don’t get much in return.

Sometimes (to be honest), I haven’t had the energy for a real conversation. Other times, I just can’t think of what to ask. As a teacher, I have often wished that kids would share stories of the awesome things we were doing with their parents, but I couldn’t figure out how to make that happen.

Now that my son is in middle school—where communication from teachers is less than it was when he was in elementary school and more stuff is happening at school that I need to be aware of—I’ve identified a list of questions that draw out important information. I wish that when I was in the classroom I’d been able to offer this list to parents so that they could hear about what we were doing in our class."


Via John Evans
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Luis Fernando Avila's curator insight, November 1, 1:46 PM
Siendo más empáticos con nuestros hijos en etapa escolar
Victor Ventura's curator insight, November 1, 4:53 PM
Review the questions and decide which ones will work best for your child and you. Article suggests you use your descretion to select the question(s) that will result in the most honest and sincere response(s). Hopefully, it will lead to a helpful conversation which leads to understanding and sharing.
You may want to reduce or alter the questions to suit your level of  comfort. Certainly, you may want to use it as a parent or share it with your students' parents at an open house in in some form of communication.
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50 people and hashtags you MUST check out on Twitter

50 people and hashtags you MUST check out on Twitter | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
Getting connected professionally on Twitter was the single most important, most powerful thing I ever did as an educator.

The most important. I’m not overstating that.

Via John Evans
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Victor Ventura's curator insight, October 28, 7:59 AM
It is highly worth the time and effort to explore and check out the people and hash tags listed here. I did and added a couple more to my list of "go to online Soutces of advice and info."
Rescooped by David Santibáñez Gómez from Leading Schools
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students who received an extra sentence of feedback achieved higher grades a year late

students who received an extra sentence of feedback achieved higher grades a year late | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
How can one sentence change the trajectory of student learning? It shows the power of feedback.
Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by David Santibáñez Gómez from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Brain Hacking 304: Why Every Educator Needs To Know How The Brain Learns | #LEARNing2LEARN #Infographic

Brain Hacking 304: Why Every Educator Needs To Know How The Brain Learns | #LEARNing2LEARN #Infographic | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it

Brain, Learning, and Teaching Infographic

I hope you find the Brain Hacking infographic above useful. You can access the other Brain-Based Learning infographics I created by scrolling down my ED!Blog. Please share it with other educators, parents, and learners. I will feature additional Brain-Based Learning Infographics in my future NEWSLETTERS, so please SIGN UP if you would like to receive more tips and strategies that work in helping students become better learners.

If you find the information in the infographic useful, consider buying "Crush School: Every Student's Guide To Killing It In The Classroom", which is a book I wrote to help students learn more efficiently and effectively using proven research based strategies.

And Remember: You Have the Power to Change the World. Use it often.

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 


Via Gust MEES
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Linez Technologies's comment, October 20, 12:40 AM
amazing information about human brain
Succeed Education's curator insight, October 20, 6:06 PM

Great article about how the brain learns.

Serge G Laurens's curator insight, October 28, 3:29 PM
Brain Hacking 304: Why Every Educator Needs To Know How The Brain Learns
Rescooped by David Santibáñez Gómez from Leading Schools
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3 Ways to Engage Students & Be Less Boring

3 Ways to Engage Students & Be Less Boring | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it
If you're already good at wait time one, try wait time two. Wait time two is the amount of time that you allow after a student's initial answer before speaking or calling on another student. I'm terrible at wait time two. I know this because when I force myself to wait for three seconds after a student responds, my class starts looking around to see what's wrong. If this wait time were typical, then students would be building on one another's answers instead of waiting for me to validate the previous response. Again, we have good intentions for not giving wait time two. We want to encourage the student who has responded, build on it, and bridge to the next concept or question. However, this stops good thinking that might be going on in the classroom and tacitly communicates that teachers are the purveyors of all knowledge.

Via Mel Riddile
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How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | #Research

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | #Research | Enseñando Ciencias | Scoop.it

— Breaking up and spacing out study time over days or weeks can substantially boost how much of the material students retain, and for longer, compared to lumping everything into a single, nose-to-the-grindstone session.


— Varying the studying environment — by hitting the books in, say, a cafe or garden rather than only hunkering down in the library, or even by listening to different background music — can help reinforce and sharpen the memory of what you learn.

— A 15-minute break to go for a walk or trawl on social media isn’t necessarily wasteful procrastination. Distractions and interruptions can allow for mental “incubation” and flashes of insight — but only if you’ve been working at a problem for a while and get stuck, according to a 2009 research meta-analysis.

— Quizzing oneself on new material, such as by reciting it aloud from memory or trying to tell a friend about it, is a far more powerful way to master information than just re-reading it, according to work by researchers including Henry Roediger III and Jeffrey Karpicke. (Roediger has co-authored his own book, “Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.”)

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/03/14/time-the-most-important-factor-neglected-in-education/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 21, 8:40 AM

— Breaking up and spacing out study time over days or weeks can substantially boost how much of the material students retain, and for longer, compared to lumping everything into a single, nose-to-the-grindstone session.


— Varying the studying environment — by hitting the books in, say, a cafe or garden rather than only hunkering down in the library, or even by listening to different background music — can help reinforce and sharpen the memory of what you learn.

— A 15-minute break to go for a walk or trawl on social media isn’t necessarily wasteful procrastination. Distractions and interruptions can allow for mental “incubation” and flashes of insight — but only if you’ve been working at a problem for a while and get stuck, according to a 2009 research meta-analysis.

— Quizzing oneself on new material, such as by reciting it aloud from memory or trying to tell a friend about it, is a far more powerful way to master information than just re-reading it, according to work by researchers including Henry Roediger III and Jeffrey Karpicke. (Roediger has co-authored his own book, “Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.”)

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/03/14/time-the-most-important-factor-neglected-in-education/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Brain

 

 

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, September 26, 2:49 AM
Leren: Er is geen geijkte weg voor.