Enrique's Journey- Immigration
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Central America: Crossroads of the Americas

Central America: Crossroads of the Americas | Enrique's Journey- Immigration | Scoop.it
Many migratory streams from Central America — including refugees, economic migrants, and transit flows headed north from South America and elsewhere — have converged in North America since the 1980s. Sarah J.
Jennifer's insight:

The Migration Information Source tells all about how the different migrants come from Central America and Honduras to start their new life in America. Many migrants came to America in the late 1990's in order to find job opportunities. To me, I'm happy that these immigrants are able to find jobs and better their lives in America, but I feel that the American government needs to limit the amount of immigrants. The other major concern I have is that when migrants embark on their journey, it is extremely dangerous. Often times, the migrants are beaten by gangs and corrupt police officers. Immigration is a good thing for America, but in moderation.

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Crossing Over

Crossing Over | Enrique's Journey- Immigration | Scoop.it
The U.S.-Mexican border is one of the most permeable boundaries in the world, breached daily by Mexicans in search of work. Thousands die...
Jennifer's insight:

"Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail" seems to share very similar experiences with those that Enrique from "Enrique's Journey" embarked upon. I plan on reading this novel since I enjoyed reading about the journey that Enrique took, it really showed me what illegal immigrants face on a daily basis. Juan in the book "Crossing Over" tells his story of how his family and himself journey to America and the dangers they face. Including the deaths of his family members. Reading this story would help reiterate the story of a migrant's journey, but this time in an adult's viewpoint.

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Activists blast Mexico's immigration law - USATODAY.com

Activists blast Mexico's immigration law - USATODAY.com | Enrique's Journey- Immigration | Scoop.it
Migrants say the country's strict ID requirements are similar to what Arizona is implementing...
Jennifer's insight:

 "Activists blast Mexico's immigration law" is a newspaper article describing how horrific the immigrants are treated when they are caught by the police. One illegal immigrant from Honduras said, "In Mexico they'll probably let you go, but they'll beat you up and steal everything you've got first." This just goes to show how inhumane and careless the police are of how the immigrants feel. In addition to the physical abuse the immigrants receive, they also receive racial slurs and harassment due to their country of origin. Another main problem with the fact that the police rob the immigrants, is the fact that if they are caught and taken in to custody it costs them a maximum of $461 to be released and 10 years in prison. If the immigrants have no family in America, there is no way for them to make the money they need to be released. The main clause of the Mexican Immigration law is number 67 which states, "whether federal, local or municipal" demand to see visas if approached by a foreigner and to hand over migrants to immigration authorities." This clause is strengthening the gangs who abuse the migrants because without ID they are able to take advantage of them and then turn them in to the judicial system of Mexico. Mexico's immigration law is extremely flawed and needs to be refined to protect the immigrant's safety. 

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Tough times; Migrant labour

http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/whic/MagazinesDetailsPage/MagazinesDetailsWindow?failOverType=&query=&prodId=WHIC&windowstate=normal&contentModules=&mode=view&displayGroupName=Magazines&limiter=&currPage=&disableHighlighting=false&displayGroups=&sortBy=&source=&search_within_results=&action=e&catId=&activityType=&scanId=&documentId=GALE%7CA189806747&userGroupName=glenbard&jsid=6a738e704239fdb55eb7843fb592d842

 

Jennifer's insight:

The article "Tough times; Migrant labour" sums up the financial struggles in America for the Latinos. When America's economy started to fall, it affected more than the illegal immigrants; it also affected the migrant's family back in their home country. The author uses Carlos Perir as an example, how he struggled through the tough times. Before the crash, Carlos Perir was able to send $600 a month home to his family of a wife and seven children. This was soon cut short to only $200 a month due to lack of opportunity to make money. Carlos was a construction worker in southern Florida which when he first came to America, was the perfect situaiton. Southern Florida was one of the most heavily populated areas with illegal immigrants. There was an industrial boom in 2006 which employed over 165,000 workers who were able to bring home $1000 a week if they were busy. Once the economy crashed and the industrail boom ended, there were 165,000 workers who were unemployed looking for money to support themselves and their family. After the tough times, Carlos could not take the separation of his family for only a few hundred dollars a week, and in the end, returned to his home country in Mexico. 

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Crossing Mexico’s Other Border | Watch Documentary Online Free

Crossing Mexico’s Other Border | Watch Documentary Online Free | Enrique's Journey- Immigration | Scoop.it
But we assume that most immigrants trying to cross the US/Mexico border are all Mexican. The reality is that a large percentage of them come from Central
Jennifer's insight:

In the film, "Crossing Mexico's Other Border" representatives reveal the stories of how many of the immigrants get to America. Many migrants need to make money along the way to America which often results in selling themselves out, particularly the women. First, in order to get into Mexico from Guatemala, migrants need to pass into Chiapas, which all Central Americans pass through. On the Chiapas-Guatemalan border are eight legal crossing sites, but over 300 illegal crossing sites. In order to cross, they must cross the river, most of them on inner tubes which can be extremely dangerous especially if it has recently rained due to the river's temperment. Most Central American's need to pay money to cross the river, so once they reach Chiapas they need to find money to continue their journey north. The majority of the women will work as strippers and prostitues, some being "pimped out." One major issue with crossing the river is the high rate of human trafficking, which is psychological slavery. Once the migrants are ready to move on to Arriaga and Oaxaca, they begin to ride the tops of freight trains. When the migrants hop off the train tops, they need to find a spot to sleep, which often results in gangs finding, robbing, and abusing them sexually. Gangs started to use the migrants to carry their drugs so they didn't risk getting caught, once the police realized this, they started to search the migrants thoroughly, including cavity searches. Along the train ride, some counties hate the migrants and want nothing to do with them; while others are waiting for the train to come through so that they can provide them with food, clothes, beverages, and occasionally shelter. The worst part of it all, out of the nearly 400 people on the train tops, only about 120 will step foot on American soil. 

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Child Migrants, Alone in Court

World History In Context
Jennifer's insight:

"Child Migrants, Alone in Court" is the same author as the book "Enrique's Journey." Sonia Nazario follows around child immigrants who are caught by the American police system and have to face the judicial system. One of the children she follows around is a 14 year old girl named Belkis Rivera. Belkis came to America from Honduras to escape gang violence and poverty, and to try and reunite with her mother and brothers. Nazario focuses on the fact that over 14,000 children are caught yearly, and when sent to court are not given a fair trial. The illegal children are not given a public defender, or any type of lawyer unless they are fortunate enough to be able to afford a private lawyer, or find pro bono lawyers willing to help them. Many children are horrified of being deported back to their country, they view America as a safe haven from poverty and gangs.

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How the Street Gangs Took Central America

How the Street Gangs Took Central America | Enrique's Journey- Immigration | Scoop.it
For a decade, the United States has exported its gang problem, sending Central American-born criminals back to their homelands -- without warning local governments.
Jennifer's insight:

Throughout the journey to America from Honduras, many migrants encountered dangerous gangs, including the famous Mara Salvatrucha (MS) gang. There were a number of gangs that were weak in America, but they soon realized if they moved to the border, their gang would be a very powerful and influential group of people. Unfortunately, the gangs thrived on weak, poor migrants. For example, the MS gang killed 28 passengers on a bus just to prove that the government wouldn't be able to control them and move them out of their area. At this time, the government was starting to crack down on gang activity in the country and the MS was one of the strongest gangs around with about 70,000 to 100,000 members. When the economy crashed, gang size grew because it was one of the easiest ways to make money quickly. One of the worst things about the Mara Salvatrucha is the fact that they take people's lives to prove a point, they shoot at random. Sometimes it would be to initiate a member and sometimes it would be to protest government action. Needless to say, gangs were a real issue in Cenral America and they were spiraling out of control at a rapid pace. 

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Young and Alone, Facing Court and Deportation

Young and Alone, Facing Court and Deportation | Enrique's Journey- Immigration | Scoop.it
An unexpected surge of children, some of them barely school age, have been caught by border agents as they tried to cross illegally into the United States.
Jennifer's insight:

 The author of the article "Young and Alone, Facing Court and Deportation" tells the story of a young boy named Juan who came to America as an illegal immigrant, was caught and appeared in court alone with no family or lawyer. The American law states that everyone is allowed and given a lawyer if need be, but this does not account for non US citizens. Illegal immigrants often appear in court alone with no lawyer due to the fact that the court does not provide them with one and most are not able to afford a private lawyer. This is particularly wrong, since most of the young children being caught, speak limited English or none at all. Many of the children that are caught, including Juan were very young, as young as age 6. Many of these young children come to America to find their parents, or their parents have sent them with a smuggler who did not successfully complete their task. The children appear in court after being caught with either limited clothes or clothes that are extremely worn and the wrong size. The event of attending court is terrifying to them, it is not uncommon for the children to urinate in their pants. Despite all of the struggles, the children still say that the journey to America is worth it due to the abundance of opportunity. 

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The map of Enrique's Journey

The map of Enrique's Journey | Enrique's Journey- Immigration | Scoop.it
Jennifer's insight:

This is the routh that Enrique took to America. He started in Tegucigalpa and touched American soil in Laredo after crossing the Rio Grande in an inner tube. He rode the top of el tren de la muerte from Tapachula to San Luis Potosi.

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Enrique's Journey

Enrique's Journey | Enrique's Journey- Immigration | Scoop.it
In this astonishing true story, award-winning journalist Sonia Nazario recounts the unforgettable odyssey of a Honduran boy who braves un...
Jennifer's insight:

Enrique's Journey is all about how Enrique progresses and deals with the struggle of his mother leaving Honduras to try and relieve the family of ongoing poverty. In the beginning of the story, Enrique is around 12 years old. Sonia Nazario, the author, follows Enrique's life throughout the story up until about 18 years old. After his mother leaves for America to find work, Enrique finds himself in a great deal of trouble and just can't seem to escape the horrible issues around him, such as: drugs, gangs, impregnation, work, and family disputes. After he impregnates his girlfriend, Maria Isabel, he decides to travel to America at the age of 14 to find his mom. Throughout Enrique's journey to America, he endures many obstacles. First of all, he doesn't have near as much money as necessary, he is tortured by gangs, and is in constant fear of the la migra, the police that have sent him back to Central America on "El Bus de lagrimos," the Bus of tears seven times. The trains are extremely dangerous, "They fall from the trains for a variety of reasons. Some fall asleep and roll off; others are thrown by the street gangs who control the train tops" (Nazario 89). While aboard the top of the freight trains, the MS gang brutally beats Enrique to the point that he may die after they find his mothers phone number on a sheet of paper and throw it in the wind after tearing it into pieces. A large part of his journey was with whom to find friendship, where to hide, and most importantly how to beg for food, water, and clothes. After the beating, our main character needs to find someone who is willing to risk getting caught helping an immigrant, and has the heart to potentially rack up thousands of dollars in hospital bills. After he is lucky enough to find someone willing to help him, he is even luckier, he is able to recover enough to continue north on "El tren de la muerte," the train of death with a sore mouth, a droopy left eye that will never heal, and an achy body. Enrique does not have enough money without his mother's help to afford a smuggler but he finds a smuggler who takes him under his wing until he can come up with the money named El Tirindaro. Enrique works washing cars for over a month in order to come up with 100 pesos for two phone cards to call home and get his mother's number and then to call his mother for money for a smuggler. Once he is able to call his mom, El Tirindaro brings Enrique across the river to America. Once in America, his mother's boyfriend picks him up at a gas station and brings him to North Carolina to finally be with his mom after years of anticipation. Enrique's life is told in great detail about how he progresses to grow as a person and accomplish new things such as: making money as a painter, buying his own truck, sending money home to his girlfriend and their daughter, and meeting new friends. Although he makes leaps and bounds in his accomplishments, he still has a fair share of problems with his mom and slips back into drugs and alcohol. Eventually, Enrique cleans up his act; he stops doing drugs and drinks only a little. At the stories end, Enrique finally convinces Maria Isabel to come to America. 

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