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Behemoth Argentine dinosaur Dreadnoughtus made T. rex look puny

Behemoth Argentine dinosaur Dreadnoughtus made T. rex look puny | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it
By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The word big does not do justice to a massive, long-necked dinosaur that shook the Earth in Argentina about 77 million years ago. Try colossal, enormous, gargantuan and stupendous - and you might come close to an accurate description of this behemoth, known to scientists as Dreadnoughtus schrani. Paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara of Drexel University in Philadelphia, who discovered the dinosaur and led the effort for its excavation and analysis, said the scientists calculated its weight on the basis of the bones in its upper arm and thigh. Dreadnoughtus weighed more than an adult sperm whale or a herd of African elephants.
Kenneth Weene's insight:

Wow, what a colossus. Got to love paleontology; how else would we know about these "great" dinosaurs? 

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Ancient flying reptile's head crest looked like a yacht's sail

Ancient flying reptile's head crest looked like a yacht's sail | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it
By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A flying reptile whose head was topped with a big bony crest shaped like the sail of a yacht swooped through the skies over Brazil roughly 90 million years ago. Scientists announced on Wednesday the remarkable discovery of about 50 fossilized skeletons of a creature called Caiuajara dobruskii, a type of flying reptile known as a pterosaur that lived alongside the dinosaurs, at a site in southern Brazil. These pterosaurs, whose wingspans measured up to nearly 8 feet (2.35 meters), inhabited a lakeside oasis in a large desert region during the Cretaceous Period, living in vibrant colonies with others of the same species of all ages, they said. "This helps us to have a glimpse on the anatomical variation achieved by this species from young to old," said Alexander Kellner, a paleontologist with Brazil's National Museum at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, who led the study.
Kenneth Weene's insight:

Got to love those fossils.

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