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Here's Why Some People Handle Stress Better Than Others

Here's Why Some People Handle Stress Better Than Others | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it
The ventral medial prefrontal cortex part of the brain shows greater flexibility in people who cope better with stress, finds a new study
Kenneth Weene's insight:
At the same time, people with more flexibility in that region are also more likely to use food and drinking as ways to reestablish comfort levels. In other words, this is the area of the brain that says "I must be comfortable no matter what the hell is going on." Reminds me of some politicians. Heck, it also sounds like me. 
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Individuals with social phobia have too much serotonin - not too little

Individuals with social phobia have too much serotonin - not too little | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it

Previous studies have led researchers to believe that individuals with social anxiety disorder/ social phobia have too low levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin. A new study carried out at Uppsala University, however, shows that the situation is exactly the opposite. Individuals with social phobia make too much serotonin. The more serotonin they produce, the more anxious they are in social situations.

Kenneth Weene's insight:

There is no subject I enjoy learning more about than neurobiology, but I keep wondering when those brain scientists will understand that the brain is filled with feedback loops, both amplifying and attenuating. To make believe that there is a simple pathway is to miss the whole glory of its functioning. 

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Why Don't Animals Get Schizophrenia (and How Come We Do)?

Why Don't Animals Get Schizophrenia (and How Come We Do)? | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it
Research suggest an evolutionary link between the disorder and what makes us human
Kenneth Weene's insight:

The price our species pays for the complexity of the human brain may well be the disorders of mind.

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Why people with depression pay more attention to negative information

Why people with depression pay more attention to negative information | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it

People with depression process emotional information more negatively than healthy people. They show increased sensitivity to sad faces, for instance, or a weaker response to happy faces. What has been missing is a biological explanation for these biases. Now a study reveals a mechanism: an unusual balance of chemicals in a brain area crucial for the feeling of disappointment.

Kenneth Weene's insight:

Absolutely fascinating reading for those of us who have an interest in neuroscience.

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Readying the neural network: Study examines extrasynaptic neurotransmitter receptors - PsyPost

Readying the neural network: Study examines extrasynaptic neurotransmitter receptors - PsyPost | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it
Synapse, the name for the signal-receiving site on a neuron, comes from the Greek word for contact. Neuroscientists used to maintain that neurons form one- ...
Kenneth Weene's insight:

This is one of those that makes sense moments I love when reading about neurology and psychology. Changing the membrane potential to allow firing. Neuro-readiness defined.

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The Surprising Brain Differences Between Democrats and Republicans

The Surprising Brain Differences Between Democrats and Republicans | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it
Two new studies further support the theory that our political decision-making could have a neurological basis.
Kenneth Weene's insight:

This is must reading if you are interested in politics. Of course, it may be that the part of the brain we use is a function of how we have taught ourselves to react to life so I don't want to get to het up about the causal implications.

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Why Your Brain Thinks This Picture Shows a Giant, Martian Crab Monster

Why Your Brain Thinks This Picture Shows a Giant, Martian Crab Monster | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it
It's called 'pareidolia'
Kenneth Weene's insight:

There goes Jesus on my toast and the Buddha in the bush outside my window. Darn science, don't you want to hang on to those great mystical experiences instead of learning about the fusiform gyri?

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Scientists Figure Out How to Retrieve 'Lost' Memories

Scientists Figure Out How to Retrieve 'Lost' Memories | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it

"The latest research shows memories “lost” to amnesia aren’t gone forever; they’re just not accessible" The photo is of serotonin crystals.

Kenneth Weene's insight:

Fascinating how quickly our understanding of brain function is growing. As a psychologist I love this kind of research. Of course, what is interesting to me when reading this report is that the stimulus, the specific room in which a shock was administered, wasn't needed to elicit the response, freezing, which suggests that the memories of stimuli and the responses to which they are connected may be stored separately.

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Adulthood begins at 25, says new research

Adulthood begins at 25, says new research | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it

“Kidults” could be a better term for those in their twenties, according to research which suggests that people do not become adults until about 25.

The adolescent desires of sensation-seeking and novelty in the brain increase as individuals leave home and fend for themselves, Beatriz Luna, a psychiatrist the Pittsburgh School of Medicine, believes.

Kenneth Weene's insight:

I don't care; I'm staying six forever and ever more. Meanwhile, this is interesting stuff if you like neurology.

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New light shed on emotional fear

New light shed on emotional fear | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it
Bad experiences and unpleasant events can remain etched into the brain for a person’s entire life. A new study has identified the brain processes at work that enable ‘bad thoughts’ to remain.
Kenneth Weene's insight:

While the writing in this piece is poorly done, the essential information is fascinating. Small though it is, the amygdala plays such a powerful role in emotional development. From my own history of PTSD I can certainly understand why this is important research. Now can it lead to treatment?

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Men and women 'wired differently'

Men and women 'wired differently' | enjoy yourself | Scoop.it
Kenneth Weene's insight:

While this is hardly conclusive, it is one of those wonderfully provocative studies that can set us talking and thinking.

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