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Reading Children's Books: Nikki Van Dusen • 13 days ago Full text of the AASUA Statement: Dear Members, As you may be aware, articles detailing a news conference held on May 1, 2015, in which Mr. D...

Reading Children's Books: Nikki Van Dusen • 13 days ago Full text of the AASUA Statement: Dear Members, As you may be aware, articles detailing a news conference held on May 1, 2015, in which Mr. D... | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it

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Velvet Martin's curator insight, May 19, 10:34 PM

http://readingchildrensbooks.blogspot.ca/2015/05/nikki-van-dusen-13-days-ago-full-text.html

 

Sunday, May 17, 2015Nikki Van Dusen • 13 days ago Full text of the AASUA Statement: Dear Members, As you may be aware, articles detailing a news conference held on May 1, 2015, in which Mr. Doug Goss, the Chair of the Board of Governors of the University of Alberta, participated with four members of the Edmonton business community were published in the Edmonton Journal and the Edmonton Sun. In the articles, Mr. Goss expressed concerns with NDP policies and highlighted the track record of the Progressive Conservatives under Mr. Jim Prentice. Regardless of his motivation, Mr. Goss’s actions are in direct conflict with his role as Chair of the Board of Governors at the University. The position publicly taken by Mr. Goss in the articles published by the Edmonton media is both cause for concern and dismay as the expression of partisan views is inconsistent with his role as the Chair of a Board of Governors of a post-secondary educational institution. As the Chair of the Board of Governors of the University of Alberta, which is the largest publicly-funded post-secondary educational institution in the province, Mr. Goss is expected to separate his public service from his private interests, act in a non-partisan fashion and be prepared to work with any party or parties that form government. Despite the Chair and the members of the Board being appointed by the Government of Alberta, the University of Alberta is an autonomous institution and all Board members have an obligation to act in the best interests of the university independent of government and independent of government policy. The recent comments by Mr. Goss, who according to the articles has acted previously as vice-president of the Progressive Conservative Party, would allow a reasonable person to conclude that the Board is not acting independently but is promoting the policies of a particular political party. All members of the Board of Governors are in fact obliged to uphold the interests of the University of Alberta in accordance with the Post-Secondary Learning Act [Section 16(5)]. As a result, the Chair of the Board of Governors of the University of Alberta is expected to speak to the values, principles and goals of post-secondary education and the interests of the University of Alberta, and to how these are affected by government policies and budget decisions. Given that the Chair of the Board of Governors is expected to act in a manner that serves the best interests of the university, the recent history of post-secondary education funding cuts by the current governing party calls into question the wisdom of the position outlined in the recent Edmonton media. That Mr. Goss was unable to maintain a non-partisan leadership stance on behalf of the University of Alberta is profoundly disappointing, because his public stance may jeopardize the relationship of the University of Alberta with whatever party forms the next government. The Association of Academic Staff University of Alberta (AASUA) looks forward to working with any political party or parties that form the next Alberta government, and is committed to working with that government to strengthen post-secondary education in Alberta and deliver the next generation of Alberta leaders. Heather Bruce, PhD Acting AASUA President I have no problems with PC clones inserted into every ABC (agency, board and commission) in Alberta if they actually did their jobs rather than do Navigator type spin for the PCs.

However it appears that these inserts into the ABCs do more than the work that they are supposed to do.  Some of them appear to do the work of promoting only one way of thinking in Alberta. This is unacceptable.  For example we had the case of Dr. Swann who was terminated by the Palliser Health Authority when he did not follow the PC party line on the Kyoto Accord.

http://injusticebusters.org/index.htm/Swann_David.htm

Alberta doctor fired for supporting KyotoBy JILL MAHONEY, Globe and Mail, October 4, 2002EDMONTON - An Alberta medical officer of health says he has been fired because of his public support of the Kyoto Protocol, a dismissal he and the province's Liberals condemn as political meddling.David Swann, a public-health officer in southeastern Alberta, was fired on Wednesday by the board of directors of the Palliser Health Region."I'm concerned that political influence can interfere with the best public-health system in Alberta," Dr. Swann said in an interview yesterday."This is a real threat to the independence of the medical officer to speak on issues of public-health importance. I think everybody should be concerned . . . if we allow non-health professionals to be influencing the decisions that we make."Dr. Swann, who is president of the Society of Alberta Medical Officers of Health, said the board was upset that he was identified as the public-health officer for Palliser in a local newspaper story in which he voiced support for the health benefits associated with ratifying the accord. The regional health authority, which manages health services in the area, is based in the southeastern Alberta city of Medicine Hat.In addition, he said that Len Mitzel, the chairman of the board of the health authority, told him he had received a telephone call from Alberta Environment Minister Lorne Taylor. Mr. Mitzel is also the president of Mr. Taylor's constituency association."The board chairman, as he was firing me, said that he had had a call from the minister," Dr. Swann said.Val Mellesmoen, Mr. Taylor's spokeswoman, confirmed that the minister, who is MLA for Cypress-Medicine Hat, telephoned Mr. Mitzel for "clarification" on whether the remarks represented the views of the health region. Mr. Taylor was told they did not. A few days later, Mr. Mitzel phoned Mr. Taylor to inform him that Dr. Swann no longer worked for the authority, Ms. Mellesmoen said."MLAs talk to the [regional health authorities] all the time, right? But in that particular case because he knows Len, he picked up the phone and said, 'Is this really your position? ' " she said. "And I can't stress enough - there was absolutely no conversation about letting him go."Kevin Taft, the Liberals' health critic, said the board, some of whose members, including Mr. Mitzel, are political appointees, should not have interfered in the work of Dr. Swann because medical officers of health require independence to speak out on matters of public health. He called their actions political meddling."I think there need to be serious questions raised [about] the relationship between Lorne Taylor and the regional health authority board, especially the chairman, and we have to question whether possibly Lorne Taylor did have some influence on this decision," he said.Mr. Mitzel did not return phone messages yesterday. However, he told CBC Radio the board was upset that Dr. Swann was identified in the newspaper as a representative of the regional health authority and that he should have given the board a "heads up" before making public comments.Last week, after Dr. Swann's remarks were published in the Medicine Hat News, the board of the Palliser Health Region voted unanimously to oppose the Kyoto Protocol. Mr. Mitzel said the health of the region would be affected by a loss of jobs."Whether it's mental health and stress, how is someone going to feed their own kids? Where are they going to find a job if oil and gas have to pull out? " Mr. Mitzel told the paper.Meanwhile, Premier Ralph Klein's government released a poll yesterday suggesting 72 per cent of Albertans oppose ratification of the Kyoto Protocol and want a "made-in-Canada" solution to cut greenhouse-gas emissions, a result the province heralded as support for its belief that the more people know about the accord, the less they like it.The poll, which was conducted by Environics West and commissioned by the government, comes four months after an Ipsos-Reid opinion survey concluded the opposite: that 72 per cent of provincial residents wanted Ottawa to sign the deal."For a long time, Kyoto was presented as the only alternative, the only option. Now . . . as Albertans learn that there are other options, they're less supportive of Kyoto," said Gordon Turtle, a spokesman for Mr. Klein.Environics West surveyed 1,200 Albertans between Sept. 17 and Oct. 2. The results have a 95-per-cent statistical likelihood of accuracy within 2.8 percentage points upward or downward.Then we had the doctor intimidation business that started (as far as I can remember with Dr. Fanning during the Klein error) and has gone on forever in Alberta.



http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/alberta-doctors-call-for-inquiry-into-intimidation/article577267/

Alberta doctors call for inquiry into intimidationJOSH WINGROVEEDMONTON — From Thursday's Globe and Mail (Includes Correction)Published Wednesday, Apr. 20 2011, 7:30 PM EDTLast updated Thursday, Aug. 23 2012, 4:36 PM EDT0 comments  



















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One by one, they've come out of the woodwork - doctors fired or forced out by Alberta health agencies after breaking rank and speaking publicly, with some then labelled as mentally ill.The allegations, made by about a dozen physicians, portray a culture of intimidation they say pervades Canada's richest health system while raising questions of political interference by Alberta's long-ruling Tory government. They also include claims of 250 cancer deaths hastened by mismanagement.In one case revealed by The Globe and Mail, a doctor who was forced from his job, David Candler, will appear before the Alberta Human Rights Commission next month to argue that he was fired unjustly for accusations of "mental disability."The Alberta Medical Association believes it's altogether enough to warrant a full judicial inquiry into "issues of physician intimidation." Such inquiries are rare, powerful measures, and the AMA waited months to support a call for one.With the AMA and doctors speaking out, the government finds itself under tremendous pressure to call an inquiry that could air any dirty laundry."I would definitely hope that the government will have to listen to the voice of all the physicians in the province," said Paul Parks, an emergency-room doctor who spoke out about overcrowding last fall and supports an inquiry. "I think the government would ignore this calling at its peril."It's the latest health controversy for the resource-rich province, which spends more money per capita on health care than any other. The ordeal began with the controversial merging of regional health boards into one entity, continued with Dr. Parks' public plea, and hit its apex last fall with the firing of health board CEO Stephen Duckett and the dismissal of an outspoken doctor-turned-MLA, Raj Sherman, from government caucus.The high-profile debacle has shaken public trust in the system, doctors say.The government tried to calm the storm by calling a limited review by the Health Quality Council of Alberta, an independent medical-review agency. The AMA now says that's not good enough, but cabinet refuses to go a step further and call an inquiry, which it says would take years and cost millions.Canada's longest-running provincial government is under fire from all sides. "When will this ever stop?" an exasperated Premier Ed Stelmach said in the legislature this week, insisting that "not one single fact came forward, only allegations," and an inquiry isn't necessary.His government appears willing to hold its ground for another week, at which point the spring legislative session is expected to end, freeing it from the attacks of Question Period."They are deflecting, denying, ducking and running. And they keep spinning this out until the end of the session," said Liberal Leader David Swann, a physician who entered politics after being fired in 2002 from his job as a regional medical officer of health after speaking out in support of the Kyoto Accord.It's Dr. Swann and Dr. Sherman, who has defected to the Liberals, imploring doctors to come forward. Altogether, at least 11 cases have bubbled up."Dr. Swann phoned up and asked if I had any examples of people being intimidated. And I sort of said, yeah - me," said Allan Garbutt, a rural Alberta doctor who came forward last week saying he was threatened at a board meeting and for speaking to media. He had stayed quiet because "there's a certain degree of fear about silent retribution."The province continues to cling to the Health Quality Council. All sides agree the council can investigate medical issues, such as waiting times, but critics say it's ill-equipped to handle complaints of intimidation. It also could not address Dr. Sherman's unproven claims that because of interference and firing of doctors, 250 cancer patients died prematurely on a waiting list.Council investigators can't subpoena witnesses, offer protection for doctors who break nondisclosure deals to speak out, and will meet behind closed doors."The last thing it will be is transparent," Dr. Parks said. The AMA agrees the council would be "inhibited" in its ability to address such questions and a judicial inquiry is "the best forum."Another case is that of Inderjit Chohan, a forensic psychiatrist who was labelled as a "paranoid Sikh" after complaining about a culture of intimidation nearly a decade ago. He sued unsuccessfully, though a judge found he indeed had his "mental integrity questioned" wrongly. He's now among those calling for an inquiry."God knows how many more cases there are. I don't know. I thought I was alone," Dr. Chohan said, adding: "Until I saw it was happening to other doctors.".......M.D.s who spoke outSix cases of doctors who have come forward with varying claims of intimidation:Ciaran McNameeThe thoracic surgeon was forced from his job a decade ago after advocating to the Progressive Conservative caucus for better cancer care. He was soon after dismissed as section head of thoracic surgery for Edmonton's health authority, and claims colleagues said he needed "emergency psychiatric care." He signed a severance deal with a nondisclosure clause and now teaches at Harvard University. He'll return to testify before an inquiry if legally protected. His case is critical, as it ties into unproven claims of 250 cancer deaths.David CandlerDr. Candler was let go in 2005 from an Edmonton-area clinic affiliated with the University of Alberta. He sued, alleging the provincial health authority "misinformed" and gave "false information" to the university that he wasn't properly doing his job. He's set to appear next week before the province's Human Rights Commission, claiming he was unjustly fired for an unspecified "mental disability."Inderjit ChohanDr. Chohan was among a group of forensic psychiatrists who questioned what his statement of claim called "incidences of racism and intimidation" in mental-health services in the province. He was subsequently called a "paranoid Sikh" by a colleague. A judge dismissed his defamation suit but agreed Dr. Chohan was justified in feeling "insulted and humiliated by having his mental integrity questioned." Dr. Chohan now works in Calgary and says he's been refused for jobs or privileges at local hospitals.Allan GarbuttA vocal rural physician, Dr. Garbutt has come forward saying he was twice intimidated by provincial or regional employees - once by a member of a now-defunct regional health board after Dr. Garbutt pressed for more services in his town, and another time after he criticized the health authority in a newspaper article. He went public a week ago at the urging of Liberal Leader David Swann, a physician and personal friend of Dr. Garbutt.Raj ShermanPerhaps the highest-profile example, Dr. Sherman - now an MLA - has twice had his mental stability questioned. The first was in 1999, when he was barred from an Edmonton hospital and ordered to seek medical treatment for his behaviour. Colleagues again questioned his mental state last year, shortly after he was ejected from caucus. Dr. Sherman has risen to folk hero status in the province, but has been criticized for failing to provide evidence.Tim WintonDr. Winton took over from Dr. McNamee as the health region's head of thoracic surgery. Soon after, he took what he calls an "unexpected withdrawal from clinical practice." He is now a university researcher and has refused to speak publicly about his experience, saying he's bound by various nondisclosure agreements. He circulated a one-page statement to media outlets, including The Globe, with a veiled reference to an inquiry - saying he would "welcome the opportunity to provide evidence in an appropriate forum" but wouldn't speak to the Health Quality Council.

This isn't the end of the doctor intimidation business. We still have Dr. Modry's case ongoing.


http://globalnews.ca/news/1801723/prominent-heart-surgeon-sues-alberta-health-services/

January 29, 2015 5:38 pmProminent heart surgeon sues Alberta Health ServicesBy John CotterThe Canadian Press43906  moreAlberta Health Services Office.Global NewsEDMONTON — A prominent surgeon in a legal battle with Alberta Health Services says the dispute has resulted in longer waits for people needing open heart surgery.Doctor Dennis Modry is suing AHS and a group of senior physicians and administrators, alleging they conspired to restrict and eventually suspend his operating privileges.Modry performed the first heart transplant in Western Canada in 1985 and became head of cardiovascular and thoracic surgery at University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton.His lawsuit alleges that AHS “ambushed” him in 2010 with false allegations of poor clinical practice that included concerns that his patients died more frequently than patients of other surgeons.He alleges that Alberta Health Services staff prepared other false reports in 2013 that stated his mortality and complication rates were too high.Modry’s lawsuit alleges conspiracy, breach of contract, defamation and malicious prosecution. Along with damages, he is seeking reinstatement with full medical privileges.Allegations in statements of claim have not been proven in court.AHS says there is no conspiracy and restrictions placed on Modry did not have a big effect on surgery waiting lists.In its statement of defence, the health agency says reviews of Modry’s performance were done in good faith.

https://www.facebook.com/GlobalEdmonton/posts/10152500974420927

Global EdmontonJanuary 30 · A prominent surgeon in a legal battle with Alberta Health Services says the dispute has resulted in longer waits for people needing open heart surgery.

 
Velvet Martin's comment, May 19, 10:37 PM
http://globalnews.ca/news/1801723/prominent-heart-surgeon-sues-alberta-health-services/
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Story Map Tour

Story Map Tour | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.
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GTAV AC:G Y8 - Changing nations

GTAV AC:G Y8 - Changing nations | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
Examines the process of urbanisation and how it changes the economies and societies of low and middle-income countries. Internal and international migration are also examined. Case studies: Australia, China, USA, one other Asian country.
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California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 8:30 PM

Major urban areas in California have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.  With this current drought getting worse, California has ordered emergency water restrictions on residents while companies and large farms have been granted exemptions even though they account for 82% of the state's annual water consumption (residential accounts for 12%). Almond farms alone consume 10% of the state's water, and many agricultural crops are incredibly water intensive land uses.  A better way to think of it isn't just about raw water usage though.  A better question to ask would be this--how does one gallon of water translate into calories that most efficiently feed people?


Questions to Ponder: How does the concept of carrying capacity relate to California urban growth/drought issues?  California passed its carrying capacity?  How are demographics, economics, politics and the environment intertwined in California?  What are the environmental limits on urban growth and development? 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 9, 8:49 AM

The mathematics of endless growth due to economic monetary rules has a clear outcome.

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Geography Podcasts

Geography Podcasts | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it

"Thanks to Fred Kunze for this growing set of MAGE educational podcasts. They are indexed according to the Minnesota Academic Standards in History and Social Studies benchmarks, keywords, and grade levels."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 27, 1:25 PM

Did you know that MAGE has dozens of podcasts for geography teachers?  Well, now you do. 


Tagpodcast.

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Australian History

Australian History | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
Preview and download the podcast Australian History on iTunes. Read episode descriptions and customer reviews.
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The Geographic Advantage

The Geographic Advantage | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
We are living in an era of receding glaciers, accelerating loss of species habitat, unprecedented population migration, growing inequalities within and between nations, rising concerns over resource depletion, and shifting patterns of interaction and identity. This website provides 11 geographic investigations aligned to the geographic questions in the NRC Understanding Our Changing Planet report. The report focuses on the future directions in the geographical sciences and how these key questions will guide research to help us understand the planet on which we live.

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tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 5:09 AM

Affects us all

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 6:17 PM

This article by the AAG emphasizes that in order to provide a healthier, more prospering world, we need to do 4 things. These 4 things are: environmental change, promote sustainability, spatial reorganization of the economy and society, and harness technological change. This will allow us to create more long term and sustainable geographic patterns. 

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 10:02 PM

I really liked this article as it was interactive. I was able to pick out the area of geography I wanted to learn about and then it took me to another page that gave me more in-depth explanations. It was an overall good refresher on different aspects of geography with emphasis on how we react with our environment. 

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Global Shipping Traffic Visualized

As stated in this NPR article: "The video shows satellite tracking of routes superimposed over Google Earth. It focuses on some of the main choke points for international shipping, such as the Strait of Malacca on the southern tip of Malaysia, Suez Canal, the Strait of Gibraltar and Panama Canal. It's a good reminder that about 90 percent of all the goods traded globally spend at least some of their transit time on a ship."

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, video, visualization.


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Ben Ricchio's curator insight, February 24, 10:30 AM

Very cool

Mediterranean Cruise Advice's curator insight, February 25, 6:46 AM

This is amazing to watch.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 26, 4:52 AM

A great visual on shipping - Geographies of Interconnections (year 9)

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Dragon Dictation: A Must-Have App for Writers - Brilliant or Insane - @AngelaStockman

Dragon Dictation: A Must-Have App for Writers - Brilliant or Insane - @AngelaStockman | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
I began using Dragon Dictation a few years ago when my work with a group of struggling writers left me searching for a tool that could help them get the great ideas they were sharing aloud onto a page. I wanted something elegant: a tool that wouldn’t interrupt students as they were speaking but rather, quietly capture what they were saying and flip it into text.

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Kerry Muste's curator insight, January 26, 9:09 PM

A useful tool for differentiation perhaps?

Sarah McElrath's curator insight, February 1, 12:52 PM

For those with Chrome, take a look at VoiceNote II for similar abilities.

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Mapping the World's Problems

Mapping the World's Problems | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
Google Earth Engine works with scientists by using satellite imagery to provide data visualizations for environmental and health issues.

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Todd Hallsten's comment, February 13, 10:39 PM
I like the idea of this map because it allows for the comparison of logged forest to preserved forest. Allowing for facts not rumored amount of trees producing air, i would really like to see a map of alaska..
Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 16, 12:23 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

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38 maps that explain Europe

38 maps that explain Europe | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
Europe, as both a place and a concept, has changed dramatically in its centuries of history.

 

Tags: Europe, map.


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Padriag John-David Mahoney's curator insight, February 19, 3:17 PM

Despite the number of maps and figures, this is a really nice, condensed  broad stroke  of European history and politics, geography, and some economies. It's  also, for me, very entertaining.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 26, 7:49 PM

Europe was once the most war torn nation, but is now known for its peace. This article’s introduction says that Europe has relative great prosperity but at the same time deep economic turmoil. I guess like everywhere else. This is a collection of 38 maps that show Europe in different stages of development to give the reader a better understanding. The first maps shows the countries that make up the EU. NATO’s growth is show in the second map from 1949 to 2009. Some maps show the unemployment rates, while others show who in Europe uses the Euro. Mine home country of Italy is shown in the lowest category of unemployment in the southern region. Other maps illustrate the histories of Europe starting in 117. AD. I think that this collection of maps is awesome for gathering knowledge on Europe. It sure is teaching me a lot.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 6, 7:55 PM

At first this was overwhelming to digest.  But then I found it amazing in the fact that Europe could be explained in 38 maps!  The break down was very interesting.  I found it funny to see the breakdown of the richest in Europe.  This being based on finance, businesses, and real estate.  Nutella is definitely one of my favorites, but I had no clue the company was worth $27 billion.  

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Google Earth Pro is now free

Google Earth Pro is now free | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it

"Over the last 10 years, businesses, scientists and hobbyists from all over the world have been using Google Earth Pro for everything from planning hikes to placing solar panels on rooftops. Google Earth Pro has all the easy-to-use features and detailed imagery of Google Earth, along with advanced tools that help you measure 3D buildings, print high-resolution images for presentations or reports, and record HD movies of your virtual flights around the world.

Starting today, even more people will be able to access Google Earth Pro: we're making it available for free. To see what Earth Pro can do for you—or to just have fun flying around the world—grab a free key and download Earth Pro today."

Tags: google, mapping, virtual tours, geospatial, edtech.


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Flora Moon's curator insight, February 4, 8:50 AM

H

Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, February 6, 6:48 AM

Before you #holidayin1770agneswater check this out!

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 11:21 AM

Spread the word and get your Google Earth Pro FREE today!!!

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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Growth Hacking for Startups - What is paid advertising?

Growth Hacking for Startups - What is paid advertising? | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it

Growth hacking was introduced by startup marketer Sean Ellis in order to redefine the marketing role for startups and online trandmarks. He thought how the more traditional “Vice Web design manager of Marketing” title had lost its luster for startups and that it no longer described the job accurately.
Now, startup marketing must think beyond conventional advertising methods and really should include engineering, resourceful thinking, and MacGyver-like ingenuity.

The growth hacker’s job is by using human psychology and engineering they are driving measurable results. For that content hacker, lifestyle isn’t much various. Content marketing performs, but as the item grows in reputation, we need for you to rethink our approach. We need to get ways to use our content pertaining to explosive growth.

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An earthquake felt across South Asia

An earthquake felt across South Asia | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it

"The magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on Saturday morning destroyed parts of Kathmandu, trapped many people under rubble and killed more than 2,500 people. It was the worst to hit the country since a massive 1934 temblor killed more than 8,000."


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Ana Carlott G. Ares's curator insight, April 28, 10:52 AM

añada su visión ...

Joshua Mason's curator insight, April 29, 11:04 AM

It's absolutely devastating what happened to Nepal. Any loss of life is a tragedy but loss of this scale is unimaginable. It's going to be a difficult rebuilding process for the Nepalese whether that's coping with the loss or physically rebuilding the nation.

 

Watching footage of shakes, what struck me the most was hundreds of year old temples crumbling. Those just aren't something you can easily rebuild. The building can eventually be replaced but the significance of it is almost lost. 

 

Those temples, like the homes in the area, were most likely not built up to a standard that could withstand earthquakes or at least earthquakes of this magnitude. It's easy to see how destruction on this scale can occur in large urban populations that were not designed to stand against such a dramatic event.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 3:59 PM

I've experienced earthquakes more times than I've ever felt the need.  We used to get them all the time it seemed in Japan.  My bed would role across the room.  It got to the point where I just slept through them.  If I had even felt a shake half as violent as what Nepal went through I could not even imagine the fright.  I wonder how long the India and Eurasia tectonic plates will stay on top of each other?  Or if a few more earth quakes will split the area?  

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A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat

A Chart Showing You How Much Water It Takes To Grow All The Food You Eat | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
How much more water does it take to produce an ounce of bread, than a ounce of juice? The answer is not quite what you might expect.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, April 9, 10:10 PM

GTAV AC:G Y9 - Biomes and food security

CD - The human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres, and the environmental effects of these alterations

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Maeklong Railway Market

"Multi-purpose land use."


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Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 14, 11:42 AM

While watching this video I was very shocked and surprised, just because I know that if I was to visit and there was a train coming by at a veggie market I would not remain calm, cool and collected like the people shown in the video. Everyone has different customs in their lives and everyone makes use of their land differently, yes it is very unsanitary to have train tracks near food but that is definitely clever and a great source of space to do such a thing. The people in this video are aware of the train passing by and just pulls back their roofs back. The train tracks seem to be raised and the food underneath is not crushed, if it did get crushed people would be out of business and lose valuable money.

This system does not work in the United States because we are not using to trains passing by so casually, while in Thailand the people are accustomed to that life and go through the same procedure everyday. Traditions and customs are a part of daily life in all different places around the world, everyone lives differently and creates a specific life for themselves.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:05 PM

In America you will hear safety first and health second. But for most veggie market sellers, health and safety do not matter. Every tiny bit of space, especially in Asian countries, are not wasted and organized. These people are used to dealing with this problem on a daily basis and they learn in the face of danger. Most of the time people live near train stations, which serves as a good location to sell products. One thing that I noticed is that no one is concerned when the trains approach the veggie market. Those veggie could get contaminated when the train goes through for example leaving metal bits from the brake system, hydraulic fluid.... etc. However, in the U.S. people argue about how the vegetables are treated with pesticides. This can lead to potential life hazards. Poor local communities need to adapt to survive in whatever space they can manage and take advantage of the available resources even when the environment makes it a challenge. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:34 PM

That's insane!!!  At the same time is great that the people figured out what works and what doesn't.  Right down to what can actually stay on the tracks, under the tracks, and the retractable awnings.  Genius!

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."


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Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2:29 AM

I think this article is very interesting because it is telling us to answer the questions that we always asked ourselves but never answered such as: "Where is our milk from?" This talks about world hunger, the food waste 'scandal' and organic farming. I believe we should all support famers markets and local natural farming. We should stop wasting so much food and only place on our plate how much we are going to eat. We should start thinking about the problem of world hunger and how are we going to solve it.

Claire Law's curator insight, April 26, 2:01 AM

Ten engaging resources on the geography of food

Kaiden-Leigh Cloete's curator insight, April 29, 11:15 PM

This topic connects to our agricultural unit. This article describes the explaining of food. Knowing where our food comes from is a big component in lit today, with all the GMO's going around we don't know what we r busy consuming daily. Having more information in our minds about food would help decrease the long term affects of genetically modified organisms, help maintain a healthy economy, provide more resources such as water, because if GMO's do come to an end then the water will not be as polluted as it is now due to the runoff from the remaining chemicals in GMO's, and also provide a healthy environment for everyone. 

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Imagining Continental Drift

"This animated documentary tells the story of polar explorer Alfred Wegener, the unlikely scientist behind continental drift theory."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 9:04 PM

While plate tectonics is now universally accepted, when Alfred Wegener first proposed continental drift it was it was greeted with a great deal of skepticism from the academic community.  This video nicely shows how scientific advancement requires exploration and imagination, and whole lot of heart.   


Tagstectonicsphysicalgeomorphology, K12STEM, video.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 20, 12:47 AM

http://www.bharatemployment.com/

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Historypin | Home

Historypin is a way for millions of people to come together to share glimpses of the past and build up the story of human history
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Images of Human/Environmental Interactions

Images of Human/Environmental Interactions | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
The blizzard of 2015 blasted the region with wind-whipped snow that piled nearly 3-feet high in some places.

 

As of 1 p.m. Monday, Boston set a new record for snowiest seven-day period in the city's history with 34.2 inches.


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Karly Shelton's curator insight, February 8, 5:08 PM

This collection of images shows a wide array of people's reactions to the recent blizzard. It is also interesting to note just how dramaticially a persons environment can change within a few hours. 

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 21, 6:39 PM

Human/Environment Interaction is one of the principles of Geography. Weather is about the simplest form of Human/Environment action there is. Weather and climate effect humans in may ways. Both of these have direct impact on agriculture and because of this the rise of civilization in the fertile crescent. But weather doesn't just dictate the rise of agriculture and civilization it effects us everyday. The picture shows Boston covered in record breaking snow fall. This altered many peoples schedules, closed businesses, canceled sporting events, forced people to spend time shoveling snow, gave work for snow plowers, and all in all effected the entirety of Boston.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 22, 6:28 PM

Human/Environment interaction is important to study because we must know how our actions affect the environment which in turn affect us. The blizzard in Boston changed the peoples ability to attend certain events and altered the way the acted. They could not drive, and could not commute long distances because of the snow. This belongs under the category of major geographical concepts underlying the geographical perspective, because Human/Environment interaction is a major geographical concept.

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10 Excellent Lessons from Google to Help Students Better Use Google Maps in Their Learning ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

10 Excellent Lessons from Google to Help Students Better Use Google Maps in Their Learning ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
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Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference

Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it

"I am torn about how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.People and cultures are the same all over the world.

These points may seem like a contradiction, but when put into proper context they teach important truths about culture."


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Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 9:48 PM

Unit 3:

Shines insight on stereotypes that are commonly used throughout the world. Reading this article really made me think about stereotypes that are so commonly used they are considered acceptable. It's a ridiculous idea to think that all people under a culture act and behave the same way. 

Emily Coats's curator insight, March 24, 12:06 PM

UNIT 3 CULTURE

This article is written to compare and contrast various ways to teach young school children about global cultures. On one hand, we can relate all cultures to each other, due to their common goals and views. For example, all families around the world aim to do what's best for each other, love and cherish one another, and try their hardest to succeed economically. On the other hand, cultures are extremely different around the world, with different music, clothing, and underlying views on life. We can continue to say that popular culture has diffused so greatly, with advanced technologies and means of transportation, so it has influenced and homogenized our landscape quite a bit. Folk culture is obviously still a powerful force, but popular culture does have some effects around the world. I believe that children need to understand the importance of maintaining diversity thy preserving folk culture but they also need to acknowledge the pros and cons of the global diffusion of popular culture and how it connects us at a global scale. 

Danielle Smith's curator insight, April 12, 12:21 AM

I think Teaching Cultural Empathy: Stereotypes, World Views and Cultural Difference is a helpful article for teachers to read. This article considers ideas I constantly come back to, whilst collecting resources and ideas for teaching students about cultural diversity and identity. How do I teach students, that ‘people and cultures are different all over the world’ (Dixon, 2015, April 2), but also the same?

Dixon suggests that we need to teach that people and cultures worldwide are the SAME and DIFFERENT simultaneously.  In this way, students can appreciate the rich diversity of cultures and societies, whilst at the same time learning values of humanity and empathy, which unite us all.

 

I believe by recognising and appreciating the rich cultures of students in the classroom, we can explore and learn about cultural diversity in an honest, rich and non-stereotypical way and allow students to feel valued at the same time. In addition, as students know each other, this helps them relate to ‘people from other places, who speak other languages’ and follow different religions to their own (Dixon, 2015, April 2). Furthermore, this should help increase intercultural understanding in the classroom by developing a ‘socially cohesive’ environment that ‘respects, and appreciates cultural, social and religious diversity’ (MYCEETA, p. 7).

 

References

Dixon, S. (2015, April 2). Teaching cultural empathy: Stereotypes, world views and cultural difference. National Geographic. Retrieved April 7, 2015, http: http://blog.education.nationalgeographic.com/2015/02/04/teaching-cultural-empathy-stereotypes-world-views-and-cultural-difference/

 

Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training, and Youth Affairs. (2008, December). Melbourne declaration on educational goals for young Australians. Melbourne: Author. 

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Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources

Finding and Using Spatial Data Sources | English and Humanities Teaching Website Resources Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it

"Data is great, but working with numbers can be intimidating. We have more data than ever before that is available to us, and graphs, charts, and spreadsheets are ways that data can be shared. If that data has a spatial element to it, the best way to visualize a large dataset might just be a map."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 3:51 PM

I hope you enjoy this article I wrote about GeoFRED, a way to visualize economic statistics.  All of my future articles for National Geographic Education will be archived here at this link


Tags: National Geographicdevelopment, statistics,  economic, mapping.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, January 28, 12:05 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 4:54 PM

Data, data...its all about data!