English Resources for 10-2
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Using Picture Books to Teach Argumentative Writing

Using Picture Books to Teach Argumentative Writing | English Resources for 10-2 | Scoop.it

So what's the difference between persuasive writing and argumentative writing? 

In persuasive writing, students passionately defend their point of view, relying upon opinion, personal experience, anecdotes, data, and examples. Argumentative writing, however, seeks to offer a more balanced approach, as it acknowledges points from the opposing view.


Via Deb Gardner
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Ted Caron's comment, March 12, 2013 10:41 AM
I wouldn't necessarily agree with the emphasis he places on the distinction between persuasive and argumentative pieces. He says that argumentative pieces acknowledge points from the opposing viewpoint whereas persuasive pieces only defend the author's own point of view. But persuasive pieces can also seek to refute counterpoints. Take, for example, the current IN middle school standards. The current middle school writing standards that relate to persuasive pieces call on students to "anticipate and address reader concerns and counterarguments." In my view, this is not necessarily the crux of what differentiates a persuasive and argumentative piece.

The biggest distinction, I believe, is something that he mentions but doesn't emphasize as strongly: A persuasive piece tends to focus on personal opinions, anecdotes and observations more than an argumentative should. Arguments, in contrast, are designed to draw upon evidence, facts and logic as a way to support a contention.

Just my thoughts.
Deb Gardner's comment, March 12, 2013 11:36 AM
Good point. Thanks for the helpful clarification!
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Today is World Poetry Day. - ReadWriteThink

Today is World Poetry Day. - ReadWriteThink | English Resources for 10-2 | Scoop.it
Students read and respond to Billy Collins' poem "Introduction to Poetry." Students then write about a favorite poem and imagine the perfect way to read it.

Via Charles Tiayon
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