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50 Reasons It's Time For Smartphones In Every Classroom - TeachThought

50 Reasons It's Time For Smartphones In Every Classroom - TeachThought | English lesson plans | Scoop.it

"To be clear–learning can happen in the absence of technology. Integrated poorly, technology can subdue, distract, stifle, and obscure the kind of personal interactions between learner, content, peer, and performance that lead to learning results.

 

But increasingly we live in a world where technology is deeply embedded into everything we do. Thinking about it simply in terms of “digital literacy” puts you about 5 years behind the curve. It’s really much more than that–less about being connected, and more about being mobile.

 

There will be growing pains, and I’m sure educators that have brought in BYOD programs into their school can come up with 50 reasons it won’t work. But most of those 50 are a product of the continued poor fit that exists between schools and communities–the system and the humans it serves."

 


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Colin Sheringham's curator insight, January 27, 2014 4:16 PM

Will be interesting to see how this works in Our "experience" class this year 

Agora Abierta's curator insight, January 28, 2014 8:23 AM

Ventajas de los dispositivos móviles en el aula: el poder del aprendizaje en las manos de nuestros alumnos.

Nacho Rivas Flores's curator insight, January 29, 2014 7:28 AM

Dedicado a aquellos docentes que prohiben los móviles en clase... 

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‘But sir, I lied’ – the value of autobiographical discourse in the classroom - Gilbert - 2012 - English in Education - Wiley Online Library

‘But sir, I lied’ – the value of autobiographical discourse in the classroom - Gilbert - 2012 - English in Education - Wiley Online Library | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
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This article brings to light how students can see through auto-biography that non-fiction can be just as much of a construction as fiction.

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"The new standards are tougher!" Teacher on Common Core English Standards

"The new standards are tougher!" Teacher on Common Core English Standards | English lesson plans | Scoop.it

Hazlett says one of the biggest changes with the new Common Core English standards is a greater emphasis on non-fiction material.

 

“It used to be maybe 20-30 percent of our teaching was non-fiction and now it’s 50 [percent] or more,” she says. “That’s a huge difference.”

 

The new standards are tougher than Ohio’s old standards, Hazlett says, and they require students to analyze writing more deeply.


Via Mel Riddile, Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry
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Dr. Dea Conrad-Curry's curator insight, December 20, 2013 12:29 PM

Many students will be more motivated to learn when they are reading informational text--authentic, publised text that teaches about the real and current world. Granted, that's not all kids need to know, but to nurture a culture of learners, we must become a world of readers.

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Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts

Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
Reading in the Reel World: Teaching Documentaries and Other Nonfiction Texts...

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What the Mind Needs to Do to Read Nonfiction

What the Mind Needs to Do to Read Nonfiction

Nancy Akhavan, November 7, 2013 | Volume 9 | Issue 3

 

Many children are not strategic readers of nonfiction text; they dive into reading nonfiction the same way they approach a story or a novel. But if students are to become literate readers in a world filled with an abundance of information, they need to be good readers and strategic readers. Strategic readers

establish goals for reading;select reading strategies appropriate for the text they are reading;monitor their reading to determine if they are comprehending or not; andhave a positive attitude toward reading.

When we bring nonfiction text and content in our classrooms, we are giving our students an invitation to know things deeply. If students are able to comprehend the text, they can be independent, strategic users, consumers, and creators of information. Here are five ways to help students become strategic readers of nonfiction text.

1. Teach text types and purposes.

Students are likely to encounter three broad categories of informational texts: texts that are common in their day-to-day lives, texts that can be found in the general classroom, and texts that are found only in content area-specific classrooms. For each type, the key to understanding the text is recognizing its specific purpose and employing the appropriate thinking skills to comprehend the text.

Day-to-day text examples include letters, journals, advertising, instructions, notices and signs, catalogs, and forms. The thinking skills that are required to understand this type of text include understanding conventions of writing, noting differences in language features, distinguishing fact from hype, seeing bias, understanding logical sequences, understanding nonfiction conventions, handling complex layouts of information, and understanding and evaluating the effectiveness of messages.General classroom text examples include biographies, autobiographies, memoirs, photographs, journals, essays, historical documents and speeches, periodicals, interviews, articles, reports, and media accounts. Comprehension of these texts requires thinking skills like analysis, synthesis, logical reflection, metacognition, and creative thinking.Content area-specific classroom text examples include lab reports, technical diagrams or models, legal briefs, and legislation. These texts require background knowledge in the content area to understand discipline-specific text conventions and terminology.

2. Teach specific nonfiction structures.

Teach your students the different types of nonfiction text structures and how to analyze text to determine its structure type before they begin reading. This way, the text structure can buoy them along as they work through a text. Research shows that skilled readers with a good understanding of nonfiction text structure have fewer problems with comprehension (Pearson & Duke, 2002).

Nonfiction text structures include the following types:

Descriptive. There is a main topic with descriptive details; information begins with general facts and then moves to specific details.Cause and effect. A causal relationship is shown between events and often involves a chronological presentation of events with definite links between at least two events.Problem-Solution. A problem and possible or actual solutions are conveyed.Question-Answer. A question-answer format is used to organize sections, headings, and content.Chronological or sequential. Events are organized by time or steps in a process.Narrative informational. The text has elements of fiction—including characters, setting, and plot—and it reads like a story, but it is built around facts and real events.Compare and contrast. Ideas and information are connected and compared.

3. Teach understanding; avoid coverage.

Too often, we get stuck in the feeling that we have to read to students or tell them information in a textbook to ensure learning, but we have to shift from our brains doing the work to letting our students' brains doing the work. Our students need to be independent learners and information consumers; you can ensure this by going deeply into teaching a couple comprehension strategies. For example, you can help students grab and retain the main idea of nonfiction texts by teaching them to ask "why" questions.

When students ask why questions, they learn and remember more information (Pressley & Wharton-McDonald, 1997). By asking why questions, students orient themselves to the main idea and details through reading and rereading to answer their questions and figure out why the new ideas in the text make sense.

4. Teach vocabulary through concepts.

Students who are skilled readers learn quite a bit of vocabulary through incidental reading (Nagy, Anderson, & Herman, 1987). However, just because students can learn vocabulary through reading, it doesn't mean that we should assign students to read nonfiction texts and let them "have at it" and hope word meanings sink in deeply. Rather, we need to teach students to focus on recognizing and exploring key vocabulary terms in informational text.

I recommend teaching deeply only a few words—the key is choosing the right words to teach. We might gravitate toward the low-frequency but intriguing words that appear in nonfiction text. These words are usually discipline-specific and may not be the ones to teach before reading. Often, students can figure out the meaning of these words while reading. We need to teach the words that appear frequently in the text and hold meaning that is essential to comprehension.

Word learning strategies also help students learn new vocabulary and give them the power to tackle nonfiction text without giving up. Word learning strategies include

Examining clues in the text.Locating clues outside of the sentence (e.g., figures or text boxes) that contain the target word.Substituting a word or expression for the unknown word and checking for context clues that support the substitution.Making predictions about word meanings and then discussing with a peer or the teacher to confirm a prediction.Revising ideas about what the word might mean to fit the context of the sentence.

5. Teach summary skills.

Teaching students to summarize is teaching them to focus their attention, and this is important for guiding students to own their reading. Two types of thinking are needed for summary writing, the ability to

Make selections, or judgments, about what information should be included or excluded.Make reductions by condensing ideas and information, substituting general ideas for specific ideas, and avoiding unnecessary detail.

Teaching students to make generalizations about a text will strengthen their selection and reduction skills by engaging the brain in deletion, generalization, and construction. All three processes are truly helpful in teaching students to write summaries, so we want them to engage in these processes as much as possible.

Engage a New Generation of Readers

With the world of information changing rapidly, it isn't enough to teach strategic reading strategies for only the printed texts that students encounter in our classrooms. We have to teach strategic reading strategies for all texts that students encounter and use on a daily basis.

Our job as teachers is to help students sustain attention and comprehension while reading all forms of nonfiction texts and apply these skills to multiple literacies. By bringing all forms of nonfiction into our classrooms and giving our students the cognitive tools to understand, access, and manipulate the information, we can unleash the world for them.

References

Nagy, W. E., Anderson, R. C., & Herman, P. A. (1987). Learning word meanings from context during normal reading. America Educational Research Journal, 24(2), 237–270.

Pearson, P.D., & Duke, N. K. (2002). Comprehension instruction in the primary grades. In C. C. Block & M. Pressley (Eds.), Comprehension instruction: Research-based best practices (pp. 247–258). New York: Guilford.

Pressley, M., & Wharton-McDonald, R. (1997). Skilled comprehension and its development through instruction. School Psychology Review, 26(3), 448–466.


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Review: Finding the Heart of Nonfiction: Teaching 7 Essential Craft Tools with Mentor Texts By Georgia Heard | MiddleWeb

Review: Finding the Heart of Nonfiction: Teaching 7 Essential Craft Tools with Mentor Texts By Georgia Heard | MiddleWeb | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
Heard helps teachers consider the potential of mentor texts and the creativity that nonfiction writing skills can encourage, says reviewer Kevin Hodgson.

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Teaching Informational Text to ELLs

Teaching Informational Text to ELLs | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
http://culturecurriculumchange.wordpress.com/orbits/
As you transition to using the CCSS for your instruction of ELLs, you are probably hearing quite a bit about the importance of teaching “informational” or nonfiction text to your students.

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Teaching Nonfiction Content Through the Art of Story

Teaching Nonfiction Content Through the Art of Story | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
Stories are an effective teaching tool for nonfiction content because they help make new concepts more personal, more memorable, more meaningful.

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Why Do We Study Shakespeare

Why Do We Study Shakespeare | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
Just why do we study Shakespeare? Is his work still relevant today?
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USC digitally remasters Holocaust testimonial tapes

USC digitally remasters Holocaust testimonial tapes | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
“ There are 4,754 interviews on damaged tapes, majority can be restored; new technology hopes to bring to life additional Holocaust testimony.”
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Projects to Engage Middle School Readers

Projects to Engage Middle School Readers | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
“ It's my fault. I'll admit it. During my eight years in the classroom, I ruined at least two amazing literary works by assigning horrifically dull reading projects. My only hope is that those middle s”
Via Skip Zalneraitis
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Makes me think if we need to re-evaluate how we choose literature
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5 Resolutions To Modernize Your Teaching For 2014 - TeachThought

5 Resolutions To Modernize Your Teaching For 2014 - TeachThought | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
"When it comes to New Year’s resolutions, we all hear about the typical weight/health/finance related promises we make to ourselves – but why not use this yearly changeover to make some classroom promises instead? We can all use some new goals, and our students will be the ones benefiting from the changes with us. Win-win, I’d say!"
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Teaching Plot Structure through Short Stories - ReadWriteThink

Teaching Plot Structure through Short Stories - ReadWriteThink | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
Students use an online graphic organizer to analyze the plot structure of "Jack and the Beanstalk" and three short stories.
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Short story

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After Setbacks, Online Courses Are Rethought

After Setbacks, Online Courses Are Rethought | English lesson plans | Scoop.it

Mr. Siemens said what was happening was part of a natural process. “We’re moving from the hype to the implementation,” he said. “It’s exciting to see universities saying, ‘Fine, you woke us up,’ and beginning to grapple with how the Internet can change the university, how it doesn’t have to be all about teaching 25 people in a room.


Via Nik Peachey
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Interesting look at MOOCS- their downfalls and benefits

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Dinah Galligo's curator insight, January 17, 2014 9:55 AM

Bilan et échecs de quelques expériences ...

Training in Business's curator insight, January 17, 2014 12:14 PM

After Setbacks, Online Courses Are Rethought

#Elearning

niftyjock's curator insight, January 23, 2014 4:18 PM

No everything works in Online Education. Are we surprised?  Watching a video and doing a quiz does not exactly create an engaging learning environment. Good to have a rethink on online education. 

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Great Non-Fiction for Teaching the Common Core

Great Non-Fiction for Teaching the Common Core | English lesson plans | Scoop.it

In this post, we share some titles from Lerner Publishers that pair nicely to offer students a well rounded reading experience.


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This Time It's Personal: Teaching Academic Writing through Creative Nonfiction

This Time It's Personal: Teaching Academic Writing through Creative Nonfiction | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
This Time It's Personal: Teaching Creative Nonfiction by John S.

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Kathy Griffin's Teaching Strategies: Nonfiction Text Features ...

Kathy Griffin's Teaching Strategies: Nonfiction Text Features ... | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
There is a lot of discussion going on about aligning our teaching and curriculum with the Common Core. I have been doing a lot of research on the subject and pouring over the information on their website.

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Literary Non-fiction - Making the Common Core Practical

Literary Non-fiction - Making the Common Core Practical | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
Literary nonfiction? That's not in Dewey Decimal. Teaching the Common Core with informational text. Sample lesson plan for elementary levels.

Via commoncore2014@gmail.com
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Quincy educators say move to Common Core no reason for worry

Quincy educators say move to Common Core no reason for worry | English lesson plans | Scoop.it

The release said the Common Core's new English language arts standards were "outraging many literature teachers by requiring them to focus less on creative literature and more on nonfiction ‘informational texts.' So instead of teaching Huckleberry Finn, they must spend more time on ‘The Evolution of the Grocery Bag,' or ‘Invasive Plant Inventory.'?"

 

Likewise, a story in The Washington Post fretted about how "English teachers worry that they will have to replace the dog-eared novels they love with historical documents and nonfiction texts."

 

Many educators in Quincy, however, say such worries about the Common Core's language arts standards are being overblown.

 

If anything, local educators say they will be teaching more classic literature instead of less. And despite some published accounts to the contrary, no one at the national level is dictating what literary texts schools in Quincy will have to teach.

 

"I think there's a fundamental misconception here," said Jody Steinke, assistant principal at Quincy High School.


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Should Shakespeare be taught in schools?

Should Shakespeare be taught in schools? | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
Express your opinion on Shakespeare being taught in schools across the country. Should the curriculum be updated, or is Shakespeare a classic mainstay?
Alycia Degenstein's insight:

Interesting debate - Should we force a relevancy connection? Can we find another texxt with an abundance of puns, metahpors, similes, personification etc.? 

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Shift_Learning: 7 Most Powerful Idea Shifts In Learning Today

Shift_Learning: 7 Most Powerful Idea Shifts In Learning Today | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
Utopian visions of learning are tempting, if for no other reason than they absolve us of accountability to create it right now, leading to nebulous romanticizing about how powerful learning could be if we just did more of Xand Y. But therein lies the rub: Tomorrow’s learning is already available, and here are 7 of the most compelling and powerful trends, concepts, and resources that represent its promise.
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LitPick

LitPick | English lesson plans | Scoop.it

Via Librarian@HOPE
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Very interesting way to get students involved with literature
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How Much Freedom Should A Teacher Have?

How Much Freedom Should A Teacher Have? | English lesson plans | Scoop.it
“ How Much Freedom Should A Teacher Have?”
Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA
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