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English Language Teaching in Practice
Sharing best practices in English Language Teaching in order to foster students' talking time.
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Remember then. 30 minutes. Intermediate to Advanced Levels. Adults.

Remember then. 30 minutes. Intermediate to Advanced Levels. Adults. | English Language Teaching in Practice | Scoop.it

Mental Imagery in the EFL classroom is always a good idea. During this activity students will be provided with a chance of working with past tenses and improve speaking skills.

 

Procedure:

 

Part 1

 

1 - Show this photo on a computer or show a school photo from the past.

2 - If using this photo, tell students this was taken in a school in Kansas in 1925. Ask them to talk about how it is different from the school they knew as a child, and what they imagine these children's lives were like. In pairs, students share ideas.

3 - Monitor students and then give them some feedback. 

 

PArt 2

 

4 - Tell students to make a list of 4 categories of things they can remember about their childhood. For example, "my favorite toy or game, what they liked to have as a snack at school, a very good friend, my favorite school subject...

5 - In pairs, using their own lists students ask their partners to tell what they remember about each category in the list: " Tell me about your favorite toy."

6  - After both students have remembered about the things on both lists, they discuss the experience briefly.

 

 

Adapted from "Imagine That!"  - Mental Imagery in the EFL classroom - Jane Arnold, Hebert Puchta , Mario Rinvolucri.

 

 

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Pictures from memory. All levels. time: 20 minutes.

Pictures from memory. All levels. time: 20 minutes. | English Language Teaching in Practice | Scoop.it

Procedure:

 

1. Bring pictures from a newspaper or magazine to the next lesson. The pictures should be quite detailed.

 

2. Devide the class into small gruops. One person in each group begins by holding his/her picture for 10 seconds. The others then make notes in L2 of as many details as they can remember.

 

3. Everyone then takes in turn to read from their notes, after which the picture is shown again and differences between notes and picture checked.

 

4. When a group has finished, swap pictures with another group and repeat the procedure.

 

N.B . The amount of guidance needed will depend on the level of the group.

By doing this activity, learners have a chance to work on Descriptive past tense, prepositions of place, phrases that describe positions in a picture ( top left, bottom right hand corner, etc.) 

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Mime interpretations - basic & intermediate levels - 20 minutes

Mime interpretations - basic & intermediate levels - 20 minutes | English Language Teaching in Practice | Scoop.it

Levels: Basic and pre-intermediate.

 

Skills: Use of gestures. Relating words and meaning to non-verbal communication.

 

Procedure:

1 - In pairs, prepare a short "silent conversation" using only mime gestures.

2 - In groups of four ( 2 pairs ), each couple perform their scene, while the other pair observes and tries to interpret the scene.

3 - The observing pair then re-enacts the scene, this time with words they think appropriate. Give feedback on interpretation.

4 - Change roles, the observing pair now performs the "silent conversation."

 

This activity generates lots of verbal and non-verbal active communication.

 

 

 

from Communicate Ideas, Norman, Levihn & Hedenquist.

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Guessing game: Detective game | Onestopenglish

Guessing game: Detective game | Onestopenglish | English Language Teaching in Practice | Scoop.it

Guessing games work wonders if your plan is to make your learners speak! Not only do they help in students' learning process in a fun way, but also trigger critical thinking and develop creative skills. The Detective game is quite challenging especially because it tackles narrative sentences so I would recommend it to upper-intermediate levels. Here, students become detectives and question the teacher about a mystery story. Hope you enjoy it!

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CICINATO CARMO's comment, April 17, 2012 12:47 PM
Guessing games are a fast and straightfoward way of reviewing/practicing language items. There’s one, which I particularly like because it involves the body senses, named “What’ in the bag?”. Honestly, I don’t know if that’s how it's really called but I remember learning it from @Tessa Woodward and I can say that it worked wonders. This activity can be used when teaching modals for speculation/deduction, verbs of senses, (order of the) adjectives and many other exponents. Let me describe its procedures:

1.Select the target (language) item and an object which relates to it somehow.
2.Put the object in a paper/plastic bag. Remember that the bag cannot be transparent.
3.Tell students there is an object in the bag and that they have to guess what it is. (Depending on the aim of the activity, students can (only) ask yes-no questions, wh-questions or make positive/negative statements). Model the kind of language you want students to produce.
4.Students make guesses about the object.
5.After 3 or 4 guesses, choose a student and let him/her touch the bag. Repeat procedure with another student and ask them to comment on their impressions.
6.Have two or three more rounds of guesses.
7.Choose another student and ask him/her to smell it. Do not let the students see what is inside the bag. Repeat procedure with another student and ask them to comment on their impressions.
8.Invite students to say what they know about the object so far.
9.Select two more students and let them look inside the bag. Ask them to generally describe/comment on the object.
10.Ask students to say what the object is and let the ones who’ve seen it confirm/say what it is.

“What’s in the bag?” can be used with all age levels and adapted to different levels of linguistic knowledge. I’ve tried it sometimes and I'm sure that my students had good fun and profited from it a lot.
Luiz Agrizi's comment, April 17, 2012 12:55 PM
Thanks for you collaboration, Cicinato ! ;) I'll make it a new post !
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15 most useful phrasal verbs | INFOGRAPHIC

15 most useful phrasal verbs | INFOGRAPHIC | English Language Teaching in Practice | Scoop.it

15 most useful phrasal verbs!


Via Monica MIRZA, Cadu Souza
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Stephan Hughes's comment, June 6, 2012 9:11 PM
Great!
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I wanna talk about | LearnEnglish | British Council

I wanna talk about | LearnEnglish | British Council | English Language Teaching in Practice | Scoop.it

Want some listening to trigger speaking opportunities? "I wanna talk about..." is a fantastic series of podcasts different people talk about what interests them. It's available for free in iTunes U. On the website you find suggestions for pre-listening activities as well. have a go! 

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Guess the object - all levels - time 10/15 minutes

Guess the object - all levels - time 10/15 minutes | English Language Teaching in Practice | Scoop.it

One more guessing game. This one is suitable for all levels , so be demanding about the questions you would like your students to produce.

 

Procedure:

-Divide class into groups. Each group decides on an object, for which the other group would know how to say in English, of course.

-The other group, then, tries to guess the object by asking yes/no questions.

-Tell sttudents they have to ask a minimum of six questions before teh first guess.

-For elementary levels, prompt questions like: Is it made of...? Can you ... it? Is it ...? Is it bigger/smaller than...? Is there one in ...? etc.

 

 

 

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I is for Imitation

I is for Imitation | English Language Teaching in Practice | Scoop.it
Listen!  Repeat! Understand! The sequence below comes from an advert for a self-study language course – an advert that I have used countless times on training sessions to (gently) mock the f...
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