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6 Things Teachers Do to Flip the Classroom

6 Things Teachers Do to Flip the Classroom | English Education | Scoop.it

Get 6 Real World Examples of a Flipped Classroom from Subject Experts.

 

The Flipped Classroom model is changing the ways students learn and teachers teach. When you flip your classroom, you offer your students rich, engaging material to consider at home, and you use class time to help them interact with the ideas. Lecturing during class time is minimized and students have a teacher nearby when they are doing work and most likely to need guidance.


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Marilyn Korhonen's curator insight, May 31, 2013 11:11 AM
The key to "flipped" is to rethink who has control of content and learning. These are some great tactics to help move instruction toward more student-led learning.
Kimberly A. Hurd's curator insight, May 31, 2013 5:52 PM

Great insight. 

Upfront40's curator insight, June 3, 2013 7:35 AM

Flipping the classroom is an ideal way to assist students who want to get ahead and be challenged while at home.

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As The Great Gatsby opens, what makes a good book adaptation, anyway?

As The Great Gatsby opens, what makes a good book adaptation, anyway? | English Education | Scoop.it
Alan Yuhas: Baz Luhrmann is the latest to try translating a celebrated book to the big screen, but there's danger in being too faithful to the text
Samuel Yeats's insight:

(Class has been studying The Great Gatsby in class this term)

Q1) What do you think is the most difficult thing about creating a film adaptation of The Great Gatsby and why?

Q2) Given the opportunity, which book or theatre production would you choose to have a film interpretation created about? Who would you choose to play the main characters? Where would it be set?

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Spelling & Vocabulary Website: SpellingCity

Spelling & Vocabulary Website: SpellingCity | English Education | Scoop.it
Teaching spelling and vocabulary is easy with VocabularySpellingCity! Students can study and learn their word lists using vocabulary and spelling learning activities and games.
Samuel Yeats's insight:

This is a great resource for diverse learners who struggle with basic literacy and sentence structure. There is an option for a premium membership at a cost however the general access is also very helpful. I would be willing to pay for a membership for my students to access. This site allows me to set focus words for the students and they can work on constructing sentences and paragraphs using these words.

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Film English

Film English | English Education | Scoop.it

The site promotes the innovative and creative use of film in language learning. All of the lesson plans revolve around the use of video and film to teach English. The site promotes cineliteracy, the ability to analyse moving images, and considers cineliteracy as a 21st century skill which our students need to learn.


Via Nik Peachey
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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, July 5, 2013 7:52 PM

This is more and more important. Increasingly students are viewing stories and need to develop the skills to analyze what they see. A useful resource.

Marta Braylan's curator insight, August 15, 2013 10:12 AM

Good lesson plans with films!

Maite Gonzalez's curator insight, February 14, 2014 5:58 AM

Baliabide ikaragarria!!

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Teenage literacy in steep decline as schoolchildren shun the classics and choose 'easy' books

Teenage literacy in steep decline as schoolchildren shun the classics and choose 'easy' books | English Education | Scoop.it
A study, by academics at Dundee University, said that the reading ability of young people in Britain was falling well behind that of other European countries.
Samuel Yeats's insight:

Q1) Do you agree that the decline in teenage literacy is due to the shift of reading material or other factors? Why?

Q2) Have you read any of the books mentioned in the article? Which ones did you find difficult and why? (If not in the article, which other books have you found difficult/challenging to read?)

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