English as an international lingua franca in education
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English as an international lingua franca in education
This site points to interesting papers and materials related to the description of English as an international lingua franca, with an emphasis on teaching, learning, assessment, curriculum design, implementation and evaluation, and teacher education.
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English Pronunciation and Accent Reduction Become Part of Basic Training for Indian Call Centers

English Pronunciation and Accent Reduction Become Part of Basic Training for Indian Call Centers | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

English pronunciation is a known issue for call centers in India. What can Indian call center workers and employers do to reduce accent in English for non-native English speakers?

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Writing Even More Concisely: Using Plain English in Social Media Writing - Business 2 Community

Writing Even More Concisely: Using Plain English in Social Media Writing - Business 2 Community | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Writing in plain English means writing in a simple and straightforward manner that lets you reach the widest possible audience. When you write in plain English, you avoid technical jargon and any type of specialized vocabulary that is likely to exclude many readers. The question is, how do you apply this principle to social media writing?

Social media has emerged as a major force on the Internet today. It has also changed the way people communicate. Along with mobile phone texting, social media is creating a whole new vocabulary. Consider the last text message, Tweet or Facebook status update that you wrote (or read). How does that compare to the type of English you were required to write in school?


Via Charles Tiayon
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The Decline and Fall of the English Major

The Decline and Fall of the English Major | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

The teaching of the humanities has fallen on hard times. So says a new report on the state of the humanities by the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and so says the experience of nearly everyone who teaches at a college or university. Undergraduates will tell you that they’re under pressure — from their parents, from the burden of debt they incur, from society at large — to choose majors they believe will lead as directly as possible to good jobs. Too often, that means skipping the humanities.

In other words, there is a new and narrowing vocational emphasis in the way students and their parents think about what to study in college. As the American Academy report notes, this is the consequence of a number of things, including an overall decline in the experience of literacy, the kind of thing you absorbed, for instance, if your parents read aloud to you as a child. The result is that the number of students graduating in the humanities has fallen sharply. At Pomona College (my alma mater) this spring, 16 students graduated with an English major out of a student body of 1,560, a terribly small number. In 1991, 165 students graduated from Yale with a B.A. in English literature. By 2012, that number was 62. In 1991, the top two majors at Yale were history and English. In 2013, they were economics and political science. At Pomona this year, they were economics and mathematics.

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Kevin Alexander's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:37 PM

When I was a freshman, my parents pressured me to choose a "pratical" major and thus I chose interests such as premed and pre-nursing. However, my passion was creative writing and I also decided to minor in strat com as well. I've learned that there are endless possibilities as an English major. 

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Can English native speakers adapt to a lingua franca world?

Can English native speakers adapt to a lingua franca world? | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it
Academia is a world of its own. Linguistic controversies are fought among scholars with little interest from the outside world. There was outrage in response to early propositions that English used...
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Oxford English Dictionary breaks own rule, lists 'tweet'

Oxford English Dictionary breaks own rule, lists 'tweet' | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Tweeting has become so popular that the Oxford English Dictionary broke one of its own rules to add 'tweet' to its lexicon. The addition stands out because it breaks an Oxford English Dictionary rule that a word needs to be in use for 10 years to be considered for inclusion. Since the Twitter social network just turned seven in March, the word aficionados broke their own rule by three years.

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Video: Russian President Vladimir Putin tries out his English

Video: Russian President Vladimir Putin tries out his English | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

In two and a half minute speech, the Russian president makes a case for Yekaterinburg to host the World Expo. And he speaks English throughout his appeal, a bit awkwardly, a somewhat strange display for those of us accustomed to seeing Putin’s carefully maintained tough-guy air.

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Renaming English: does the world language need a new name?

Renaming English: does the world language need a new name? | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

English is rapidly becoming a lingua franca in international communication for commerce and trade, education, science, international relations and tourism. . . there is some sadness in the idea that we might be the last generation of travellers who experience those amusing and sometimes awkward moments when attempting to order food or ask for directions in a country where everyone doesn’t speak English.

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Thailand's English skills lowest in SEA - The Nation

Thailand's English skills lowest in SEA - The Nation | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

The JobStreet.com English Language Assessment (JELA) results show Singapore workers have the highest average score while Thai workers have the lowest. The results are from the 1,540,785 assessment takers in the Southeast Asia countries of Singapore, the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand. The assessment takers were from many positions and levels, from the junior executives and senior executives to managers and senior managers. It was found that entry level employees of three or less years got the lowest scores on average when compared with the other job levels in same countries.

Nicos Sifakis's insight:

An interesting statistic.

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Interview with author of new book on English as the lingua franca of science | Inside Higher Ed

Interview with author of new book on English as the lingua franca of science | Inside Higher Ed | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Whether or not science needs a global language -- which, Scott L. Montgomery believes, it does -- like it or not, it already has one: English.

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Why so little Chinese in English?

Why so little Chinese in English? | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Twenty years from now, how many Chinese words will be common parlance in English? ... So perhaps China's rise is simply too new, and we just need another 20 years or so. We've seen a similar film before. Japan's sudden opening to the world, a world war, and then forty years of an economic boom put quite a few Japanese words and concepts into the Anglophone mind . . .

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Is Mandarin the New Language of Private Banking?

Is Mandarin the New Language of Private Banking? | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it
With so many rich in Chinese-speaking countries, could Mandarin be the new language of private banking?
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US fails non-English speakers, international students

US fails non-English speakers, international students | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it
International students, undoubtedly, are a minority, especially in a strict system where English is almost required for students to truly succeed.
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John McWhorter: Txtng is killing language. JK!!!

Does texting mean the death of good writing skills? John McWhorter posits that there's much more to texting -- linguistically, culturally -- than it seems, a...
Nicos Sifakis's insight:

Excellent talk by an expert. Texting seen as a "linguistic miracle happening right under our noses". 

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How do you spell English expert? With I, N, D, I, A and N - The National

How do you spell English expert? With I, N, D, I, A and N - The National | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Indian Americans do very well in spelling bees – and there is a good reason for that. .  . India has 22 official languages, but the 1991 census pointed out that 1,576 languages were classified as mother tongues. That's diversity, even if the number is down from 1,652 languages in 1961.

As English makes inroads into the Indian tongue, more regional languages will bite the dust.

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English as a Lingua Franca in the International University: The Politics of Academic English Language Policy (to be published by Routledge on Aug 8th 2013)

English as a Lingua Franca in the International University: The Politics of Academic English Language Policy (to be published by Routledge on Aug 8th 2013) | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

In this book, Jennifer Jenkins, one of the leading proponents of English as a Lingua Franca, explores current academic English language policy in higher education around the world. Universities around the world are increasingly presenting themselves as "international" but their English language policies do not necessarily reflect this, even as the diversity of their student bodies grows. While there have been a number of attempts to explore the implications of this diversity from a cultural perspective, little has been said from the linguistic point of view, and in particular, about the implications for what kind(s) of English are appropriate for English lingua franca communication in international higher education.Throughout the book Jenkins considers the policies of English language universities in terms of the language attitudes and ideologies of university management and staff globally, and of international students in a UK setting. The book concludes by considering the implications for current policies and practices, and what is needed in order for universities to bring themselves in line linguistically with the international status they claim.

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Poor English, computer skills make graduates unemployable - The Times of India

Poor English, computer skills make graduates unemployable - The Times of India | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Of the five million odd graduates that India produces annually, only a little over half are employable in any sector of the knowledge economy. Inadequate English and computer skills are key factors holding back students, especially those from smaller towns.

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English is no longer the language of the web

English is no longer the language of the web | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Conventional wisdom suggests that English is becoming “the world’s second language,” a lingua franca that many forward—looking organizations are adopting it as a working language... Statistics about Internet usage show much faster growth in countries where English is not the dominant language has been. In 1996, more than 80 percent of Internet users were native English speakers. By 2010, that percentage had dropped to 27.3 percent. While the number of English-speaking Internet users has almost trebled since 2000, twelve times as many people in China use the Internet now as in 1996. Growth is even more dramatic in the Arabic—speaking world, where twenty-five times as many people are online as in 1996.

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Essay on debate in France over use of English at universities | Inside Higher Ed

Essay on debate in France over use of English at universities | Inside Higher Ed | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

In recent weeks, amid all its woes over rising unemployment and a declining economy, France seemed to be embroiled in yet another impending disaster, at least to some French people. The French Assembly was about to vote on a controversial proposal that would ease legal restrictions on courses taught in English at French universities. Watching the positions publicly unfold, I understood the benefits to be gained from more exposure to English particularly for French researchers and students. I further recognized the challenges that France must face in making the new law meet its stated goals. Yet I could not help but lament the potential loss for American and other foreign students studying at French universities.

Nicos Sifakis's insight:

Informative

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Learn computerese as a second language (that's code for code)

If you learn how to read and write in English, with practice and several rejection slips under your belt, you can possibly become the next Stephen King. Ditto for computer programming: study how to read and write half-decent code and building the next Facebook can be within your reach.

Nicos Sifakis's insight:

Perceptive

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FYI: texting doesn't threaten native languages

FYI: texting doesn't threaten native languages | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

When Swiss people write text messages using mobile devices, they use only a few English expressions, a study commissioned by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) has revealed. The report somewhat allays fears of English’s dominance. What’s more, Anglicisms – words or phrases imported from English – were found to be more indicative of a higher education than of declining language standards.(Article originally published here: http://theconversation.com/renaming-english-does-the-world-language-need-a-new-name-14763)

Nicos Sifakis's insight:

Another very interesting insight.

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The English language in the ‘Asian century’ - University World News

The English language in the ‘Asian century’ - University World News | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Asia is seen as the future for the internationalisation of higher education, and the globalisation of English is enabling this future. Countries in Asia have therefore started to align their internationalisation strategies towards this Asia focus. . .

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Cameron Hogg's curator insight, June 13, 2013 5:28 AM

With the spread of the English langague growing through Asia, it should improve the level of trade between the Western world and Asia further from where it already is

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Essay on debate in France over use of English at universities | Inside Higher Ed

Essay on debate in France over use of English at universities | Inside Higher Ed | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

In recent weeks, amid all its woes over rising unemployment and a declining economy, France seemed to be embroiled in yet another impending disaster, at least to some French people. The French Assembly was about to vote on a controversial proposal that would ease legal restrictions on courses taught in English at French universities. Watching the positions publicly unfold, I understood the benefits to be gained from more exposure to English particularly for French researchers and students. I further recognized the challenges that France must face in making the new law meet its stated goals. Yet I could not help but lament the potential loss for American and other foreign students studying at French universities.

Nicos Sifakis's insight:

Some further facets of the continuing lively debate.

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Interview with author of new book on English as the lingua franca of science | Inside Higher Ed

Interview with author of new book on English as the lingua franca of science | Inside Higher Ed | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Whether or not science needs a global language -- which, Scott L. Montgomery believes, it does -- like it or not, it already has one: English.

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Pop culture helps students learn English

Pop culture helps students learn English | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it
Teachers are using pop culture to help students from less privileged backgrounds learn English as a second language, writes Anjali Hazari
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European Union incites [sic] its bureaucrats to speak better English

European Union incites [sic] its bureaucrats to speak better English | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Euro zone policymakers generally issue official statements in English. Unfortunately, many don’t do it so well. To help them out, the European Court of Auditors released new guidelines (pdf) on the use of 100 English words that have been used incorrectly. ”Our publications need to be comprehensible for their target audience, which is largely British and Irish, and should therefore follow a standard that reflects usage in the United Kingdom and Ireland,” writes Jeremy Gardner, the report’s author. Some of the mistakes are excusable, especially since many European officials aren’t native speakers of English. But others are, well—here are some of our favorites . . .

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