English as an international lingua franca in education
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English as an international lingua franca in education
This site points to interesting papers and materials related to the description of English as an international lingua franca, with an emphasis on teaching, learning, assessment, curriculum design, implementation and evaluation, and teacher education.
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Simplifying wording of UN climate decisions could bring big benefits – lawyer

Simplifying wording of UN climate decisions could bring big benefits – lawyer | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

For all but the most clued-up experts – and I expect even for them – the decisions that come out of UN climate negotiations can be a nightmare. That’s not just because they’re often desperately lacking in ambition. The wording itself – reference-laden, eye-wateringly long, hugely repetitive and maddeningly complicated – makes it difficult to make even basic sense out of what has been decided, particularly for anyone outside the negotiating room. It’s even worse for non-English speakers, who must try to comprehend the tortured language after it’s been through a UN translation process. Could simplifying the wording help improve understanding, and perhaps drive better, faster action on climate change? ...

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The next Internet revolution will not be in English

The next Internet revolution will not be in English | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Imagine if, every time you wanted to visit a website, you were expected to type in letters from a foreign language, or worse, an entirely foreign script, such as Arabic, Cyrillic, or Chinese. For more than a billion people, this is how they experience the Internet today. The Internet was designed to be global, but it was not designed to be multilingual. For decades, this limitation was most evident in website and email addresses, which permitted only a small set of Latin characters. ...

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If we're going to compete, we need multilingual graduates

If we're going to compete, we need multilingual graduates | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

The reported decline of language teaching in [UK] higher education is very worrying. Universities need to address the crisis in language teaching creatively and urgently.

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Craig Harkey's curator insight, September 11, 2013 7:26 PM

Multilingual people have a easier time when it comes to the business world especailly when all the economies are moving from country based to a global economies. Its only a matter of time before language becomes more condensed and absent which will envolve lose of language. This has been seen even in the United States with the decline in Native American languages that are becoming extinct or already are.

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Japan’s Education Minister Aims to Foster Global Talents

Japan’s Education Minister Aims to Foster Global Talents | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Hakubun Shimomura, Japan’s minister for education and science, has been working to make the country’s universities more competitive globally since his appointment to the post in December. In an interview, he discussed the government’s “Abenomics” policies, as well as the need to internationalize Japanese higher education, attract foreign faculty, improve English language capabilities and update the admissions process.

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Chinese readers increasingly prefer English books to translations

Chinese readers increasingly prefer English books to translations | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Chinese readers increasingly prefer foreign books in English rather than their translated Chinese versions, boosting sales of English language books in China. The growing popularity of English books in China was described as a "surge" by Zhao Wei, publisher at an international publishing house based in Beijing. Zhao was once manager of the China division of Random House, the largest general-interest book publisher in the world.

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Ioanna Pastarmatzi's curator insight, August 21, 2013 4:32 AM

A 'surge of English speaking' audiences.

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First-ever English proficiency test for Indian English medium schools launched - The Times of India

First-ever English proficiency test for Indian English medium schools launched - The Times of India | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

MUMBAI: Education First has rolled out the first ever English Proficiency Survey (EPI) on Indian English Medium High Schools starting grade 8 till grade 10. This global research study on the english proficiency will map the proficiency of high school students from 22 countries and rank the countries based on their proficiency levels. Every year EF conducts a survey on the English proficiency of adults from 60 countries and it is known as the EF English Proficiency Index (EPI).

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Languages: All united against dominance of English

Languages: All united against dominance of English | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it
In response to growing enthusiasm among Europeans for English as a lingua franca, a Romanian intellectual sounds the alarm and calls for a mobilisation to safeguard national languages.
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No we haven't 'literally killed' the English language. Or metaphorically killed it. Stand down, semantics nerds – Telegraph Blogs

Oh no! What are we to do? People are using "literally" to mean "not literally"! The world is metaphorically coming to an end!
Nicos Sifakis's insight:

It happens to the best of languages...

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Alex Kuo reflects on Asian Americans who write in English - VOXXI

Alex Kuo reflects on Asian Americans who write in English - VOXXI | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Alex Kuo, an English-language professor of writing, literature and cultural studies, also reflects on Asian Americans who write in English. Mike Morrow, a Hong Kong publisher, makes this astounding observation: English is a Chinese language. That is so because many more people in China use English now than does the rest of the world. That makes it a language of China just as Spanish is a language of the U.S.

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TIME Magazine Profiles Quebec's Orwellian War On English And How It Is Doing Irreversible Damage

TIME Magazine Profiles Quebec's Orwellian War On English And How It Is Doing Irreversible Damage | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

To live in Quebec is to become accustomed to daily reminders that French in the Canadian province is the most regulated language in the world. Try, as I did recently, to shop at Anthropologie online and you’ll come up empty-handed. The retail chain (which bears a French name) opened its first Montreal boutique in October, but “due to the Charter of the French Language” has had its site shut down: “We hope you’ll visit us in store!” Montreal’s transit authority maintains that under the present language law, its ticket takers must operate in French, which lately has spurred complaints from passengers. Last year, the city of Montreal erected 60 English safety signs nearby Anglophone schools in an effort to slow passing vehicles. The Quebec Board of the French Language and its squad of inspectors ordered that they be taken down; a snowy drive through town revealed that all had been replaced by French notice. . . In February, a language inspector cited the swank supper club Buonanotte, which occupies a stretch of St. Laurent Boulevard, Montreal’s cultural and commercial artery, for using Italian words like pasta on its otherwise French menu . . . It’s true: despite the nuisances and controversies generated by Bill 101, Quebec’s 1977 Charter of the French Language, the province had settled in the past years into a kind of linguistic peace. But tensions have mounted considerably since the separatist PQ returned to the fore . . .

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India’s Indigenous Languages Drive Wikipedia’s Growth | TechCrunch

India’s Indigenous Languages Drive Wikipedia’s Growth | TechCrunch | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it
Despite accommodating the world's second largest English-speaking population behind the United States, India's dozens of indigenous languages are driving the adoption of Wikipedia on the subcontinent...
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50 shades of grey, rhubarb-rubarb, etc.

50 shades of grey, rhubarb-rubarb, etc. | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it
David Crystal has been monitoring the effects of the internet on spelling, gaining insight into the future of English, writes Hans Pienaar
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In every word, a microhistory

In every word, a microhistory | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

14-year-old Anamika Veeramani won [the US] 83rd National Spelling Bee on June 4 by correctly spelling the word stromuhr. It’s one of many English words in the contest that sounded decidedly unEnglish. Other words from this year’s contest: barukhzy (from a Pashto word that went through Russian before becoming English) , tanha (from a Sanskrit-derived Pali word), izar (originally Arabic, then went through Hindi before becoming English) and uitlander (from Afrikaans, which formed it from two Dutch words, plus a Latin-derived combining form). These are all English words…yes, English words, even if they’re spelled according the rules and pronunciation of other languages. There are many reasons for this mongrelization of English spelling [. . .]

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Ministry to train ‘English leaders’

Ministry to train ‘English leaders’ | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

The education ministry has decided to create a new training program to cultivate leaders who will instruct public primary school teachers in proper English-teaching methodology, it has been learned. The ministry is currently considering making English an official primary school subject.

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'Twerk' dancing and 'selfie' photos added to English dictionary

"Twerk", a provocative dance move that has gone viral, and "selfie" a photograph taken of oneself using a phone, are two new words added to the Oxford English Dictionary on Wednesday.

Nicos Sifakis's insight:

I mean ... srsly?

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Latest cleanup of Chinglish long overdue - People's Daily Online

Latest cleanup of Chinglish long overdue - People's Daily Online | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Many expats in Shanghai will be pleased about a new campaign to standardize the use ofEnglish and other foreign languages to make the city friendlier to foreigners. This drive is long overdue, though it may be a minor disappointment to lovers of“Chinglish,” the Sinofied version of sometimes comical and often unintelligible English oftenfound at shops, restaurants and other public venues. ... Nearly every foreigner in China has his or her own favorite Chinglish signs, and I’mcertainly no exception. A visiting Singaporean friend and I began laughing uncontrollablywhile at a restaurant whose English menu had comically translated all the dishes literallyfrom their poetic Chinese names. An embarrassed waiter finally came over and took awayour menus. ...

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Counting the Languages of the World - Lingua Franca - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Counting the Languages of the World - Lingua Franca - The Chronicle of Higher Education | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

Given the many plausible proposals for revising language counts upward or downward by splitting or invention, or by lumping or elimination, I think if I were asked how many languages there are in the world today I would want to be very vague: For the UK, 10 ± 4, and for the world, 7,000 ± 2,500.

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'World Literature Certainly Sounds Like a Nice Idea'

'World Literature Certainly Sounds Like a Nice Idea' | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

”What is "World Literature" when it's not just a euphemism for "contemporary Western lit"? What we’re looking at is not so much “World Literature” as “World Literature (in English).

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Something borrowed, something new

Something borrowed, something new | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it
WALK through an international city and you will see quite a lot of English. Walk through an expat-dense neighbourhood in Berlin, like the one Johnson has recently...
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English, the Language of the Future

English, the Language of the Future | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

A study revealed that in the United Arab Emirates students perceive that their mother tongue (Arabic) is relevant to culture, home, religion, tradition, schools, social sciences and art. In the meantime, the same group considers English as the symbol of work, higher education, economics, commerce, science, technology, and modernity.

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Oxford English Dictionary mulls what gets in, what stays in the ‘boondocks’

Oxford English Dictionary mulls what gets in, what stays in the ‘boondocks’ | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

... For English to become a lingua franca, Dollinger argued, the Oxford English Dictionary would not only have to include words from countries such as Canada and the U.S., or even former British colonies such as India or Pakistan, but nations such as China, Russia and other European countries as well. Dollinger said making English a world language is less about exerting linguistic dominance and more about moving away from the language’s colonial history and making it intelligible to all those who use it ...

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The rise of Indian English - Telegraph

The rise of Indian English - Telegraph | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it
It has taken decades of struggle, but more than half a century after the British departed from India, standard English has finally followed.
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New English-language bookstore a 1st in Havana

New English-language bookstore a 1st in Havana | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

HAVANA (AP) — Anglophones, rejoice: Cuba's first English-language bookstore, cafe and literary salon opened in Havana on Friday, offering islanders . . .

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Vietnam: Ministry to scrutinise English qualification of language teachers

Vietnam: Ministry to scrutinise English qualification of language teachers | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

 VietNamNet Bridge – The Ministry of Education and Training will carry
out an English teacher quality assessment at colleges and universities
nationwide in September. Teachers are required to have 90 points or more on the TOEFL iBT, 7.0 in IELTS, 850 for all four English communication skills in TOEIC tests or have passed the Cambridge CAE, CPE.

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138,000 speak no English - census

138,000 speak no English - census | English as an international lingua franca in education | Scoop.it

The number of people living in England and Wales who could not speak any English was 138,000, latest figures from the 2011 census show. After English and Welsh, the most reported main language was Polish, with 546,000 speakers, followed by Punjabi and Urdu. Some 4 million - or 8% - reported speaking a different main language other than English or Welsh.

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Nicos Sifakis's comment, August 5, 2013 8:03 AM
Thanks for the suggestion. From what you say the series looks very interesting. Sadly the 4oD you forwarded is only available in the UK (I think) -- certainly not in Greece (where I'm based).
Mikaela Balder Isc's comment, August 5, 2013 8:23 AM
That is a shame! Perhaps you can search for it on Youtube?
Nicos Sifakis's comment, August 5, 2013 8:25 AM
I will, but I doubt it all be available right now (because of rights)