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Rescooped by David Holmberg from Literary Festivals & Book Award News
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English literature's 50 key moments from Marlowe to JK Rowling

English literature's 50 key moments from Marlowe to JK Rowling | Content Strategy | Scoop.it
What have been the hinge points in the evolution of Anglo-American literature? Here's a provisional, partisan list

Via O Segrel Do Penedo, Literary Festivals
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Peta-Dannielle Adda's curator insight, April 8, 2014 12:31 AM

By drawing the students' attention to changing literature throughout time, they will look into how the first authors recorded works and how technology has changed how people produce, publish and distribute literary works now and in the future.

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The True Literature of California Is Science Fiction - Gizmodo

The True Literature of California Is Science Fiction - Gizmodo | Content Strategy | Scoop.it
And it struck me that it was an accurate literature, that it was what my life felt like; so I thought science fiction was the literature of California. I still think California is a science fictional place.
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Scooped by David Holmberg
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SMS English ( Lesson) - Modern English abbreviations and Shortened text messages

SMS English ( Lesson) - Modern English abbreviations and Shortened text messages Not only non-native, but also native speakers have problems with the SMS tex...
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Scooped by David Holmberg
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You've Sent Mail: A Letter-Writing App Forces Users to Slow Down - Businessweek

You've Sent Mail: A Letter-Writing App Forces Users to Slow Down - Businessweek | Content Strategy | Scoop.it
You've Sent Mail: A Letter-Writing App Forces Users to Slow Down
Businessweek
The New York company is trying to use technology to revitalize the dying art of letter writing.
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The Origin of the English Names of Colors - Today I Found Out

The Origin of the English Names of Colors - Today I Found Out | Content Strategy | Scoop.it
So, like other cultures, English words for the colors generally followed that same pattern, with black and white coming first, and purple, orange and pink coming last. The Parents of Modern English. Although a number of the ...
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English purism: Johnson: What might have been | The Economist

English purism: Johnson: What might have been | The Economist | Content Strategy | Scoop.it
THE English poet William Barnes (pictured) is no household name. But that is almost a shame, because he represented a strand that we don't otherwise see much of: English purism. Imagining what would have happened if ...
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Rescooped by David Holmberg from Email Marketing Leads
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OnlineLeads Marketing Research Specialists

OnlineLeads provider market research reports and industry analysis on products, markets, companies, industries worldwide.

Via KaleyParker
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KaleyParker's curator insight, October 25, 2013 6:08 PM

Market Research is not only about numbers, graphs and statistics; it is also about a timeline, a trend and the history about your brand and interactions customers have with it. With market research you can gain intelligent business insight to drive strategic decision making.

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How to Write a Great Research Paper

An eye-opening talk... Professor Simon Peyton Jones, Microsoft Research, gives a guest lecture on writing. Seven simple suggestions: don't wait - write, iden...
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Rescooped by David Holmberg from Learning technologies for EFL
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How and Why We Read: Crash Course English Literature #1

In which John Green kicks off the Crash Course Literature mini series with a reasonable set of questions. Why do we read? What's the point of reading critica...

Via Shona Whyte
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Shona Whyte's curator insight, October 10, 2013 1:46 AM

Nice justification of literature, liberal arts, pitched beautifully for anglophone teens, but just about right for undergrad second language speakers, IMO.

Eion_D's curator insight, March 30, 2014 6:44 AM

Hopefully more engaging than the last post, John Green has created a series of Crash Course videos based around Literature. This is the first, it links in to our discussions about thinking critically, and why it's so important to be able to delve deeper. Finding meaning, creating an analysis of a text shouldn’t be a nightmare; it should give you the opportunity to view the world differently. So with that in mind, and having watched the video, I want you to sit down and have a think about the text Romeo & Juliet, before answering these two questions:

            Using the comments section, create for me, a list of the things you have learnt from the play. It's pretty simple, just a list of information, literary concepts, feelings or understandings you have gained from reading the play. Why? Because reflecting on what we've learnt from a text will help us move forward in understanding ourselves and how we can communicate those changes with others. By doing it together, with everyone's input, we can create a storyboard of our learned experiences as a group.

            Pick a character from the play (this exercise may help, if you're struggling to build the above list). Choose the character you thought you would most hate. Tell me why you thought they would be loathsome. And then as clearly and concisely as you can, explain why you were surprised that you didn't hate them at all. What experiences changed your mind? Were they persuasive speakers? Did their actions redeem themselves in your eyes? What emotion, or lived experience caused you to empathise with them, despite how much you wanted to hate them?

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Six Strategies That Have Quickly Improved My Writing - Lifehacker

Six Strategies That Have Quickly Improved My Writing - Lifehacker | Content Strategy | Scoop.it
In the past six months that I've been a content crafter at Buffer, I've been writing a lot. I've also been trying to write regularly on my own blog and for my startup. That's a lot of writing. During this time, I've been experimenting ...
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