Engineering The Cure
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Engineering The Cure
Finding the cure for sufferings of the world. Following transhumanist technologies that could enable our techno-utopian future.
Curated by AUNG THIHA
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Philosophical Disquisitions: Is human enhancement disenchanting? (Part One)

Philosophical Disquisitions: Is human enhancement disenchanting? (Part One) | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
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20 New Biotech Breakthroughs that Will Change Medicine

20 New Biotech Breakthroughs that Will Change Medicine | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
From a spit test for cancer to a shot that helps your body re-grow nerves along your spinal cord, these new advances in the world of medicine blur the line between biology and technology—to help restore, improve and extend our lives.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
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Primo Post-Human: Trans-humanist Culture

Primo Post-Human: Trans-humanist Culture | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
The transhumanist Culture Natasha Vita-More Cultural movements, from the Graeco-Romans, Romanesque culture, Humanism, the Renaissance, Romanticism, Modernism, and Postmodernisms to transhumanism, c...
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Quant junkies: The future is now

Quant junkies: The future is now | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

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Socrates Logos's curator insight, January 17, 2013 9:49 AM

By JP Mangalindan

"Want to keep track of every piece of personal data in your life? There's probably a tool for you.

If you want something done, do it yourself, the old saying goes. It's a philosophy that fuels the "quantified self," a growing movement toward tracking one's life with the help of technology. It extends far beyond Nike's (NKE) groundbreaking Nike+ running app: Devotees can dutifully track fitness routines, eating habits, even medical conditions. And companies are developing tools for nearly every scenario imaginable. Here are just a few.FitnessRunKeeper employs a phone's GPS to track activities like running and cycling, and through its Health Graph lets users compare performance. Devices like the Fitbit apply a data-tracking method called actigraphy to gauge movements during sleep.MedicineThe Spiroscout sensor, an inhaler attachment, uses satellite data to show asthmatics locations that may worsen their condition. The Boozerlyzer, built to measure blood alcohol levels, can be doctored to track drug intake and side effects.LifestyleWith GreenGoose's sticker-size sensors, everyday items  -- toothbrushes, toys, even pets -- transmit data back to an egg-shaped base station. Users can keep track of information such as how often they've brushed their teeth or if someone walked the dog...."


http://bit.ly/W2saJn

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This Google patent application had us at 'laser keyboard'

This Google patent application had us at 'laser keyboard' | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
Google applies for a patent that could let Project Glass project a keyboard onto your arm. Read this article by Casey Newton on CNET News.
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27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts In 2012

27 Science Fictions That Became Science Facts In 2012 | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
We may never have our flying cars, but the future is here. From creating fully functioning artificial leaves to hacking the human brain, science made a lot of breakthroughs this year.
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The most innovative Medical Apps of 2012

The most innovative Medical Apps of 2012 | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

By: Iltifat Husain, MD; Timothy Aungst, PharmD; Tom Lewis Introduction: At iMedicalApps, our goal is to review apps from a Physician standpoint so we can help healthcare providers navigate the growing number of available medical and healthcare apps.


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The Brain in the Machine: I.B.M's Compass

The Brain in the Machine: I.B.M's Compass | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
I.B.M. has just announced the world’s grandest simulation of a brain, all running on a collection of ninety-six of the world’s fastest computers. Are full-scale simulations of human brains imminent, as some media accounts seem to suggest?

Via Sandeep Gautam
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Scientists make monkeys smarter using brain implants. Could you be next?

Scientists make monkeys smarter using brain implants. Could you be next? | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
For the very first time, scientists have demonstrated that a brain implant can improve thinking ability in primates.
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PLOS ONE: A Simple, Low-Cost Conductive Composite Material for 3D Printing of Electronic Sensors

PLOS ONE: A Simple, Low-Cost Conductive Composite Material for 3D Printing of Electronic Sensors | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.

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Communication channel between cells and machines paves way toward bio-hybrid robots

Communication channel between cells and machines paves way toward bio-hybrid robots | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
(Phys.org)—While some advanced humanoid robots already look eerily lifelike, robots in the future may actually become partly alive.
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Eye tracking is the future of high-speed, maximum accuracy input | ExtremeTech

Eye tracking is the future of high-speed, maximum accuracy input | ExtremeTech | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
Are the demonstrations now circulating among trade shows and conventions niche gimmicks, high-wire circus acts, representing the limits of current hardware tweaked to the extreme after much practice and patience, or do they flow surely and easily...

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Perpetually connected: Are wearable computers and bio-implants the future of mobile?

Perpetually connected: Are wearable computers and bio-implants the future of mobile? | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
In today’s connected world, you’d be hard pressed to find a population (disregarding technophobes and lost tribes) who actively shun activities that are digitally mediated. Unfortunately ...
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Probing The Matrix: Is our universe simulated, and if so… by who? | ExtremeTech

Probing The Matrix: Is our universe simulated, and if so… by who? | ExtremeTech | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
Interpreting the universe as a computer simulation is perhaps the inevitable byproduct of living in the computer age.
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meta AR glasses to offer gesture control of 3D virtual objects

meta AR glasses to offer gesture control of 3D virtual objects | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
A new start-up called meta has partnered with Epson to develop augmented reality glasses that will allow virtual objects to be controlled in 3D space using ...

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Programming Nature

Programming Nature | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

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Socrates Logos's curator insight, January 22, 2013 2:11 PM

Entrepreneurs are transforming synthetic biology into real dollars

 When: Tuesday,  January 22, 2013 6:00 - 7:00pm  Networking and Refreshments 7:00 - 8:30pm  Panel Discussion and Q&A WhereCemex Auditorium at Knight Management Center (Parking and Directions) Event Description: Synthetic biology was once-upon-a-time reserved for big pharma and the multimillion dollar chemical manufacturing industry. But today, startups and hackers in their garages and basements are using cloud based services and low cost labs, tools, and equipment to manipulate organisms to produce materials and products of economic value. Startups like Lygos are altering the DNA of yeast and e-coli to produce nylon, polyester, and polypropylene for clothing. RefactoredMaterials is transforming proteins to create materials that mimic spider silk. All of this is possible because cloud-based services and low cost tools are enabling these companies to quickly and cheaply build and iterate through multiple DNA blueprints to discover the right formula to produce these materials. Come to our event on January 22, 2013 at the Stanford Graduate School of Business to learn: What are the tools and cloud services that enable synthetic biology for startups?What are the keys to low cost innovation that will democratize synthetic biology and create profitable ventures?How do movements like Biohacking and Biocurious help shape this new movement?Can backyard biologists have the same impact that the homebrew computer clubs did in the 1980s?Is there a Moore's law equivalent for this space and what do investors see as the next big opportunities?Join us to Learn More. Moderator:  Megan Palmer, Deputy Director,  Stanford University, Synthetic Biology Engineering Research Center (SynBERC) Panelists:  Dan Widmaier, CEO, Refactored Materials  Nathan J. Hillson, Founder and Chief Scientific Officer, Teselagen Warren Hogarth, Partner, Sequoia Capital   Sasha Kamb, Senior Vice President, Amgen      http://bit.ly/141eoKs ;
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Ben Goertzel interviews Natasha Vita-More

Ben Goertzel interviews Natasha Vita-More | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
h+ Magazine is a new publication that covers technological, scientific, and cultural trends that are changing human beings in fundamental ways.
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Biohacking -- you can do it, too

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Socrates Logos's curator insight, January 16, 2013 2:08 PM

talk by
Ellen Jorgensen

"We have personal computing, why not personal biotech? That's the question biologist Ellen Jorgensen and her colleagues asked themselves before opening Genspace, a nonprofit DIYbio lab in Brooklyn devoted to citizen science, where amateurs can go and tinker with biotechnology. Far from being a sinister Frankenstein's lab (as some imagined it), Genspace offers a long list of fun, creative and practical uses for DIYbio."

http://bit.ly/UQLBS4

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Biohybrid: Scientists have combined a spinach photosynthetic protein with silicon technology

Biohybrid: Scientists have combined a spinach photosynthetic protein with silicon technology | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at Vanderbilt University have developed a way to combine the photosynthetic protein that converts light into electrochemical energy in spinach with silicon, the material used in solar cells, in a fashion that produces substantially more electrical current than has been reported by previous “biohybrid” solar cells.

 

“This combination produces current levels almost 1,000 times higher than we were able to achieve by depositing the protein on various types of metals. It also produces a modest increase in voltage,” said David Cliffel, associate professor of chemistry, who collaborated on the project with Kane Jennings, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering.


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Mobile Devices, Imaging Apps, and the Future of Healthcare ...

Mobile Devices, Imaging Apps, and the Future of Healthcare ... | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

Physicians are incorporating iPads and other mobile devices into their practices at an unprecedented pace. A 2012 study conducted by Manhattan Research, involving 3015 U.S. practitioners in over 25 specialties, revealed ...


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A Depression Switch? - New York Times

A Depression Switch? - New York Times | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
By implanting electrodes in the brains of patients, doctors seem to have successfully reversed some severe depressions — and provided a new way of thinking about mental illness.

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Building a Homemade Spacecraft

"Anyone with some brains and lots of courage can build their own space rocket using everyday, off-the-shelf products. We recently flew to Denmark to meet the ...

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33rd Square | 3D Printing Of Electronic Sensors Now Possible With Carbomorph Material

33rd Square | 3D Printing Of Electronic Sensors Now Possible With Carbomorph Material | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
Scientists are developing new materials which could one day allow people to print out custom-designed personal electronics such as games controllers which perfectly fit their hand shape.

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Engineered bacteria can make the ultimate sacrifice

Engineered bacteria can make the ultimate sacrifice | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

"Scientists have engineered bacteria that are capable of sacrificing themselves for the good of the bacterial population. These altruistically inclined bacteria, which are described online in the journal Molecular Systems Biology, can be used to demonstrate the conditions where programmed cell death becomes a distinct advantage for the survival of the bacterial population.

"We have used a synthetic biology approach to explicitly measure and test the adaptive advantage of programmed bacterial cell death in Escherichia coli," said Lingchong You, senior author of the study and an associate professor at the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, and the Duke Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy. "The system is tunable which means that the extent of altruistic death in the bacterial population can be increased. We are therefore able to control the extent of programmed cell death as well as test the benefits of altruistic death under different conditions." The lead author of the study is Yu Tanouchi, a graduate student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. Anand Pai and Nicolas Buchler also contributed to the work.

Scientists have known for some time that programmed cell death can be linked to the response of bacteria to stressful conditions, for example starvation of amino acids or the presence of competitor molecules. However, it is not clear why cells should choose to die under such conditions since it gives them no immediate advantages. Some researchers have suggested that programmed cell death allows cells to provide benefits to their survivors but until now it has been difficult to test this directly in experiments..."

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Microsoft's Real-Time Translation Software Converts English to Chinese—and Preserves the Sound of Your Voice | MIT Technology Review

Microsoft's Real-Time Translation Software Converts English to Chinese—and Preserves the Sound of Your Voice | MIT Technology Review | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

Software turns English into synthesized Chinese almost instantly keeping your personal voice.

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