Engineering The Cure
Follow
1.1K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
onto Engineering The Cure
Scoop.it!

Perpetually connected: Are wearable computers and bio-implants the future of mobile?

Perpetually connected: Are wearable computers and bio-implants the future of mobile? | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
In today’s connected world, you’d be hard pressed to find a population (disregarding technophobes and lost tribes) who actively shun activities that are digitally mediated. Unfortunately ...
more...
No comment yet.
Engineering The Cure
Finding the cure for sufferings of the world. Following transhumanist technologies that could enable our techno-utopian future.
Curated by AUNG THIHA
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by AUNG THIHA from SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute
Scoop.it!

First ever biological amplifier created by Imperial scientists

First ever biological amplifier created by Imperial scientists | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

Via Socrates Logos
more...
Socrates Logos's curator insight, August 14, 6:08 PM

by Gail Wilson

"Scientists have made an amplifier to boost biological signals, using DNA and harmless E. coli bacteria.

Conventional amplifiers, such as those that are combined with loudspeakers to boost the volume of electric guitars and other instruments, are used to increase the amplitude of electrical signals.
Now scientists from Imperial College London have used the same engineering principles to create a biological amplifier, by re-coding the DNA in the harmless gut bacteria Escherichia coli bacteria (E. coli). 

The team say this ‘bio-amplifier’ might be used in microscopic cellular sensors , which scientists have already developed, that could detect minute traces of chemicals and toxins, to make them more sensitive. Ultimately, this could lead to new types of sensors to detect harmful toxins or diseases in our bodies and in the environment before they do any damage.
In laboratory tests, the team’s bio-amplifier was able to significantly boost the detection limit and sensitivity of a sensor designed to detect the toxin arsenic. The device is also modular, which means that the devices can be easily introduced in different genetic networks, and can potentially be used to increase the sensitivity and accuracy of a broad range of other genetic sensors to detect pathogens and toxins.
The results of the study are published in the journal Nucleic Acids Research. 
Dr Baojun Wang, who is now based at the University of Edinburgh, but carried out the study while in the Division of Cell and Molecular Biology at Imperial, said: “One potential use of this technology would be to deploy microscopic sensors equipped with our bio-amplifier component into a water network. Swarms of the sensors could then detect harmful or dangerous toxins that might be hazardous to our health. The bio-amplifiers in the sensors enable us to detect even minute amounts of dangerous toxins, which would be of huge benefit to water quality controllers.”
Scientists have previously known that cells have their own inbuilt amplifiers to first detect and then boost biological signals, which are crucial for survival and reproduction. They have been attempting to understand how they work in more detail so as to remodel them for other applications. However the challenge for scientists has been engineering a device that can predictably amplify signals without distortion or feedback.
In the study, scientists first re-engineered genes involved in a special cell network called hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity), which have naturally occurring amplifying proteins that function just like an electronic amplifier. They then cloned these amplifying components and inserted them into the harmless gut bacteria E. coli, fitting it with a synthetic arsenic input sensor and a fluorescent green protein gene as the output.  ..."


http://bit.ly/Yadvkb

ComplexInsight's curator insight, August 15, 2:33 AM

Click title or image to learn more.

Rescooped by AUNG THIHA from SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute
Scoop.it!

An idea blossoming: Revolution Bioengineering

An idea blossoming: Revolution Bioengineering | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

Via Socrates Logos
more...
Socrates Logos's curator insight, May 26, 4:33 PM

by
Colm Gorey

"With the SynBio axlr8r programme getting under way, Siliconrepublic.com spoke to Keira Havens of Revolution Bioengineering who, with her business partner, want to turn plants into a multicoloured spectacle.

Following the Synthetic Biology Future event held last March in Cork, a number of companies, scientific research groups and individuals from around the world reached out to take part in the accelerator aimed at bringing the rapidly developing field of synthetic biology to the wider world.
One such pairing was Keira Havens and Nikolai Braun of Revolution Bioengineering, whose research is aimed at developing plants that can be bio-engineered into changing colours depending entirely on what they, or whoever they design the plant for, want.
But also, the pair are attempting to make the field of synthetic biology a much more attractive and, frankly, less fear-inducing science that many of the general public think when it comes to the concept of tinkering with the very fabric of nature and genetic modification.
Fulfilling a dream
Just a matter of hours before the deadline for applications for the SynBio axlr8r, both Havens and Braun were facing the prospect of their colour-changing flower being doomed to literally never see the light of day.
Despite putting forward their research proposals to a number of scientific bodies in the US, the pair were facing the possibility that the prohibitive cost of proof-of-concept reports needed, particularly in plant science, as well as the day-to-day living of working their day jobs, would be just too much for the project to continue.
As any scientist may say, rarely is scientific research a part-time job and with the added competition of well-published laboratories and traditional government grants, the pair were almost ready to call it quits.
Thankfully, for both of them, Hawaii-native Havens stumbled across the SynBio axlr8r website and more so on a whim and for practice, decided to apply for this relatively small accelerator programme based in University College Cork (UCC).
Just two weeks later, Havens and Braun received the news they had been accepted to the accelerator and now faced the challenge of leaving everything in the US behind them and establishing themselves in Ireland, a place where neither of them had been before.
“Being able to devote resources and our full attention is an incredible opportunity on its own and we were about to give up,” says Havens, “but we probably wouldn’t be here if it wasn’t for the (SynBio) accelerator.”
The science
So how do you turn a regular green-leaved plant into a unique blue plant with a person’s name genetically coded into its leaves?
As Haven stresses, the science behind actually creating their goal is still very much in development but the basic scientific theses are there to be worked on.
In fact, the concept of a flower changing colours is not as science fiction as it may sound.
In nature, there already exists plants that change colour, depending on their environment. For example, hydrangeas will turn a reddish colour if the soil is particularly acidic, but will also turn bluer if the soil is more basic.
The biology behind this is the result of small molecules known as anthocyanins. Revolution Bioengineering plans to change the environment of these molecules by connecting certain genes to the plant’s internal clock used to benefit from photosynthesis.
This, they hope, will give them a flower that can change colour throughout the day and create unique designs that can see it turn from red to blue and back again.
It is their hope that once they have developed the science, they will be able to remove the stigma attached to what the plant would be, a genetically modified organism (GMO).
With examples in the news of engineered crops causing havoc with ecosystems and supposed negative effects on human health, the term GMO has almost become an acronym to fear in some circles.
For Havens and Braun, however, they believe if they can show the beautiful side of science, their flowers could prove a watershed moment in pushing forward some other significant syn-bio advances that could greatly benefit the world.
“This is a beautiful physical representation of how science can transform our world, and it is also accessible to everybody for their inspection and enjoyment,” says Havens.
“It's a product that the public can touch and interact with on their own terms, and it is a powerful way to demonstrate what plant molecular technologies can bring to the planet for the benefit of everybody.”
Science vs business
The only question remains as to how to most successfully balance scientific research and endeavour with a sound business strategy.
Traditionally never going hand-in-hand, there has always been the somewhat conflicting ideals of pursuing scientific research for purely scientific benefits and the actual need to make it a viable product, especially when it comes to something like a colour-changing plant aimed at appealing to the public.
“Running a business is very, very different from being a scientist, so different it’s not even funny,” says Havens.
“Having Bill (Bill Liao of SOSventures, which is behind the SynBio axlr8r) to talk to about the process and hear from their perspective in how they made that transition and maintain your scientific credibility without sacrificing a successful business has been great. Business wants to sell anything and science wants to strive for knowledge and pure ideals and they conflict at times. We’re slowly learning that we may have to make sacrifices at times to balance.”
Right now however, they’re still firmly focused on getting the research done to create their colour-changing plant, but in the meantime, they still wish to engage with the Irish public, and those around the world, about the potential for synthetic molecular biology.
“We have been delighted to be able to talk to the public about something that is controversial and frightening. People aren’t too comfortable talking to large companies about it because they feel they’ve vested interests in it and sometimes it’s difficult to have conversations about it. We want to be a part of that conversation.”"


 http://bit.ly/TNMKAa

Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Brain finds true beauty in maths

Brain finds true beauty in maths | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
Brain scans show a complex string of numbers and letters in mathematical formulae can evoke the same sense of beauty as artistic masterpieces and music from the greatest composers.
AUNG THIHA's insight:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-26151062

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

What We Can Learn From the Quantum Calculations of Birds and Bacteria - Wired Science

What We Can Learn From the Quantum Calculations of Birds and Bacteria - Wired Science | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
AUNG THIHA's insight:

Quantum Biology. 
Birds and Bacteria use quantum mechanics.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Encounters with the Posthuman - Issue 1: What Makes You So Special - Nautilus

Encounters with the Posthuman - Issue 1: What Makes You So Special - Nautilus | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
On the second balmy day of the year in New York, Neil Harbisson, a Catalan artist, musician, and self-professed “cyborg,” walked…
AUNG THIHA's insight:

A great read.
#transhumanism

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Could Life Be Older Than Earth Itself? : DNews

Could Life Be Older Than Earth Itself? : DNews | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
Applying a maxim from computer science to biology raises the intriguing possibility that life existed before Earth did.
AUNG THIHA's insight:

Could Life Be Older Than Earth Itself?

Two geneticists have applied Moore’s Law to the rate at which life on Earth grows in complexity — and the results suggest organic life first came into existence long before Earth itself.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Why The Human Body Will Be The Next Computer Interface

Why The Human Body Will Be The Next Computer Interface | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
By now you’ve probably heard a lot about wearables, living services, the Internet of Things, and smart materials.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Building Better Minds - and What to Do with Them | World Future Society

Building Better Minds - and What to Do with Them | World Future Society | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AUNG THIHA from SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute
Scoop.it!

Why Synthetic Biology Is the Field of the Future

Why Synthetic Biology Is the Field of the Future | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

Via Socrates Logos
more...
Socrates Logos's curator insight, February 28, 2013 6:48 PM

by
Jay Keasling

"Most Americans may not be familiar with synthetic biology, but they may come to appreciate its advances someday soon. Synthetic biology focuses on creating technologies for designing and building biological organisms. A multidisciplinary effort, it calls biologists, engineers, software developers, and others to collaborate on finding ways to understand how genetic parts work together, and then to combine them to produce useful applications.

 Synthetic biology is a relatively young field, begun only about ten years ago. But in that time, we have made some astonishing progress. This is due, in part, to the enormous improvements in our ability to synthesize and sequence DNA. But we’ve also gained a much greater understanding of how the various parts of the genome interact. We now can reliably combine various genetic pieces to produce a range of consumer products, from biofuels to cosmetics....."

http://to.pbs.org/Z0UEAQ

Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

A sensational breakthrough: the first bionic hand that can feel

A sensational breakthrough: the first bionic hand that can feel | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
The first bionic hand that allows an amputee to feel what they are touching will be transplanted later this year in a pioneering operation that could introduce a new generation of artificial limbs with sensory perception.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AUNG THIHA from Collective intelligence 2.0
Scoop.it!

Network Theory - Marc Samet

Network Theory - Marc Samet | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
From social media to massive financial institutions, we live within a web of networks. But how do they work? How does Googling a single word provide millions of results?

Via renee fountain
more...
Ken Morrison's curator insight, January 27, 2013 7:16 AM

A nice #TedEd annimation on network theory.

Ken Morrison's comment, January 27, 2013 7:17 AM
I appreciate the helpful animation and clear explanation. Thanks for sharing
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

The bionic man, and what he tells us about the future of being human

Rex, as he's called, has been put together by an expert team for a forthcoming Channel 4 documentary 'How to Build a Bionic Man' - in an effort to show just ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AUNG THIHA from SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute
Scoop.it!

Cell circuits remember their history

Cell circuits remember their history | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

Via Socrates Logos
more...
Socrates Logos's curator insight, February 10, 2013 5:54 PM


by
Anne Trafton

"MIT engineers have created genetic circuits in bacterial cells that not only perform logic functions, but also remember the results, which are encoded in the cell’s DNA and passed on for dozens of generations.

 The circuits, described in the Feb. 10 online edition of Nature Biotechnology, could be used as long-term environmental sensors, efficient controls for biomanufacturing, or to program stem cells to differentiate into other cell types. “Almost all of the previous work in synthetic biology that we’re aware of has either focused on logic components or on memory modules that just encode memory. We think complex computation will involve combining both logic and memory, and that’s why we built this particular framework to do so,” says Timothy Lu, an MIT assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science and biological engineering and senior author of the Nature Biotechnology paper. Lead author of the paper is MIT postdoc Piro Siuti. Undergraduate John Yazbek is also an author.  More than logic Synthetic biologists use interchangeable genetic parts to design circuits that perform a specific function, such as detecting a chemical in the environment. In that type of circuit, the target chemical would generate a specific response, such as production of green fluorescent protein (GFP).   Circuits can also be designed for any type of Boolean logic function, such as AND gates and OR gates. Using those kinds of gates, circuits can detect multiple inputs. In most of the previously engineered cellular logic circuits, the end product is generated only as long as the original stimuli are present: Once they disappear, the circuit shuts off until another stimulus comes along.  Lu and his colleagues set out to design a circuit that would be irreversibly altered by the original stimulus, creating a permanent memory of the event. To do this, they drew on memory circuits that Lu and colleagues designed in 2009. Those circuits depend on enzymes known as recombinases, which can cut out stretches of DNA, flip them, or insert them. Sequential activation of those enzymes allows the circuits to count events happening inside a cell. Lu designed the new circuits so that the memory function is built into the logic gate itself. With a typical cellular AND gate, the two necessary inputs activate proteins that together turn on expression of an output gene. However, in the new circuits, the inputs stably alter regions of DNA that control GFP production. These regions, known as promoters, recruit the cellular proteins responsible for transcribing the GFP gene into messenger RNA, which then directs protein assembly. For example, in one circuit described in the paper, two DNA sequences called terminators are interposed between the promoter and the output gene (GFP, in this case). Each of these terminators inhibits the transcription of the output gene and can be flipped by a different recombinase enzyme, making the terminator inactive.  Each of the circuit’s two inputs turns on production of one of the recombinase enzymes needed to flip a terminator. In the absence of either input, GFP production is blocked. If both are present, both terminators are flipped, resulting in their inactivation and subsequent production of GFP.  Once the DNA terminator sequences are flipped, they can’t return to their original state — the memory of the logic gate activation is permanently stored in the DNA sequence. The sequence also gets passed on for at least 90 generations. Scientists wanting to read the cell’s history can either measure its GFP output, which will stay on continuously, or if the cell has died, they can retrieve the memory by sequencing its DNA. Using this design strategy, the researchers can create all two-input logic gates and implement sequential logic systems. “It’s really easy to swap things in and out,” says Lu, who is also a member of MIT’s Synthetic Biology Center. “If you start off with a standard parts library, you can use a one-step reaction to assemble any kind of function that you want.” Long-term memory Such circuits could also be used to create a type of circuit known as a digital-to-analog converter. This kind of circuit takes digital inputs — for example, the presence or absence of single chemicals — and converts them to an analog output, which can be a range of values, such as continuous levels of gene expression.  For example, if the cell has two circuits, each of which expresses GFP at different levels when they are activated by their specific input, those inputs can produce four different analog output levels. Moreover, by measuring how much GFP is produced, the researchers can figure out which of the inputs were present. That type of circuit could offer better control over the production of cells that generate biofuels, drugs or other useful compounds. Instead of creating circuits that are always on, or using promoters that need continuous inputs to control their output levels, scientists could transiently program the circuit to produce at a certain level. The cells and their progeny would always remember that level, without needing any more information.  Used as environmental sensors, such circuits could also provide very precise long-term memory. “You could have different digital signals you wanted to sense, and just have one analog output that summarizes everything that was happening inside,” Lu says. This platform could also allow scientists to more accurately control the fate of stem cells as they develop into other cell types. Lu is now working on engineering cells to follow sequential development steps, depending on what kinds of inputs they receive from the environment.  Michael Jewett, an assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at Northwestern University, says the new design represents a “huge advancement in DNA-encoded memory storage.” “I anticipate that the innovations reported here will help to inspire larger synthetic biology efforts that push the limits of engineered biological systems,” says Jewett, who was not involved in the research."http://bit.ly/Y3KzUJ


this is a comment to:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/106140549977596536572/posts/Ae1bKTr1Bqz

Rescooped by AUNG THIHA from SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute
Scoop.it!

Programmable on-chip DNA compartments as artificial cells


Via Socrates Logos
more...
Socrates Logos's curator insight, August 14, 5:25 PM

by
Eyal Karzbrun, Alexandra M. Tayar, Vincent Noireaux, Roy H. Bar-Ziv

"The assembly of artificial cells capable of executing synthetic DNA programs has been an important goal for basic research and biotechnology. We assembled two-dimensional DNA compartments fabricated in silicon as artificial cells capable of metabolism, programmable protein synthesis, and communication. Metabolism is maintained by continuous diffusion of nutrients and products through a thin capillary, connecting protein synthesis in the DNA compartment with the environment. We programmed protein expression cycles, autoregulated protein levels, and a signaling expression gradient, equivalent to a morphogen, in an array of interconnected compartments at the scale of an embryo. Gene expression in the DNA compartment reveals a rich, dynamic system that is controlled by geometry, offering a means for studying biological networks outside a living cell."

 http://bit.ly/1qaF0k3

ComplexInsight's curator insight, August 15, 2:36 AM

At Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Study at Harvard, Roy Bar-Ziv is expanding his research to explore the paradigm of programmable on-chip DNA compartments as artificial cells, in which the essential reactions of living cells encoded in DNA take place inside miniaturized compartments fabricated in silicon. Understanding the emergent properties of these compartments may lead to assembly of artificial cells capable of computation, autonomous sensing, and replication, with applications in future technologies.

Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Graphene-based Microbattery Ushers in New Age for Biotelemetry - IEEE Spectrum

Graphene-based Microbattery Ushers in New Age for Biotelemetry - IEEE Spectrum | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
PNNL researchers develop new battery design for tracking salmon through rivers
AUNG THIHA's insight:

Graphene microbatteries for biotelemetry
 
"The battery has what's called a “jelly-roll” structure, in which layer after layer are laid on top of another and then rolled up into a cylindrical shape, like a jelly roll. The three layers are a separating material sandwiched on either side by a fluorinated graphene cathode and a lithium-based anode.
This design enabled a significant increase in the surface area of the electrodes without increasing the overall size of the battery. Measurements indicate that the capacity of the material to store a charge is about double that of traditional microbatteries previously used in acoustic fish tags. The researchers claim that the battery can power a 744-microsecond signal sent every three seconds for about three weeks, or about every five seconds for a month. With these numbers, the researchers believe it’s the smallest battery with enough energy capacity to maintain that level of signaling."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AUNG THIHA from SynBioFromLeukipposInstitute
Scoop.it!

Microsoft commits to the Open Science movement

Microsoft commits to the Open Science movement | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
Microsoft Research's Andy Wilson demonstrates a 'touch-screen' projector on Joshua Topolsky's back.
Microsoft will aim to make all of its scientific research publicly accessible in a move to...

Via Socrates Logos
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Magnetic Microbots Perform Eye Surgery Without a Single Incision

Magnetic Microbots Perform Eye Surgery Without a Single Incision | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
Our eyeballs are some of our more delicate organs, and the mere thought of them having to be sliced open for surgery is unsettling.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AUNG THIHA from Chair et Métal - L'Humanité augmentée
Scoop.it!

Printable bionic ear sends hearing to the dogs

Printable bionic ear sends hearing to the dogs | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
Scientists have created a 3D-printed cartilage ear with an antenna that extends hearing far beyond the normal human range. Read this article by Michelle Starr on CNET.

Via Jean-Philippe BOCQUENET
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Nanoparticles loaded with bee venom kill HIV

Nanoparticles loaded with bee venom kill HIV | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
(Medical Xpress)—Nanoparticles carrying a toxin found in bee venom can destroy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) while leaving surrounding cells unharmed, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Scientists Enhance Intelligence of Mice with Human Brain Cells

Scientists Enhance Intelligence of Mice with Human Brain Cells | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
It's not quite Rise of the Planet of the Apes, but it may not be too far off, either. By grafting human glial cells into the brains of mice, neuroscientists were able to "sharply enhance" their cognitive capacities.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Facebook, Google tech gurus to design cancer research game

Facebook, Google tech gurus to design cancer research game | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists from a British cancer charity are teaming up with technology gurus from the likes of Amazon, Facebook and Google to design and develop a mobile game aimed at speeding the...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

How Google Retooled Android With Help From Your Brain | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com

How Google Retooled Android With Help From Your Brain | Wired Enterprise | Wired.com | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
When Google built the latest version of its Android mobile operating system, the web giant made some big changes to the way the OS interprets your voice commands.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AUNG THIHA from Cultural Worldviews
Scoop.it!

Roots of language in human and bird biology

Roots of language in human and bird biology | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
The genes activated for human speech are similar to the ones used by singing songbirds, new experiments suggest.

Via ramblejamble
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by AUNG THIHA
Scoop.it!

Becoming biohackers: Learning the game

Becoming biohackers: Learning the game | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it
More and more amateur biologists are carrying out genetic experiments in homes and garages worldwide. How easy is it to do? Three writers tried to find out.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by AUNG THIHA from Medical Apps
Scoop.it!

iExaminer connects your iPhone and ophthalmoscope, has telemedicine potential

iExaminer connects your iPhone and ophthalmoscope, has telemedicine potential | Engineering The Cure | Scoop.it

Welch Allyn’s iExaminer is the next step in ophthalmoscopes for your practice.


Via Guus van den Brekel
more...
No comment yet.