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Rescooped by Maggie Giuffrida from Negative Effect of Social Media
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4 negative effects of social media - THV 11

4 negative effects of social media - THV 11 | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it
THV 11
4 negative effects of social media
THV 11
Here are four weird negative effects of social media on your brain. Check out more on this list from Reader's Digest: 5 Weird Negative Effects of Social Media On Your Brain.

Via Sam Smiley
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

Social media is making us women gain weight! Oh no. Studies show that constantly seeing "food porn" images trigger the women's mind to think that they are hungry when they are not. So, when you sarcastically lean over to your girlfriend and say "wow, that chocolate covered banana looks really good, I am hungry for that," you actually are hungry for that banana.

 

Social media has also increased consumer spending. More psychographically, social media has messed with the ability to think independently - who am I or what is my role in society? Most tragically, there has been a decrease in self-esteem as an effect of the social media craze.

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A Former Player's Guide to Social Media, Image Consciousness and Self ... - Bleacher Report

A Former Player's Guide to Social Media, Image Consciousness and Self ... - Bleacher Report | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it

Bleacher ReportA Former Player's Guide to Social Media, Image Consciousness and Self ...Bleacher ReportIn an industry saturated in carefully manipulated public image, intensely guarded and packaged for family entertainment, each player is forced to...


Via Sam Wee
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

This is an interesting perspective: from a professional athlete's POV. Athletes are trained to say the right thing on camera and on social media. "By the time they’re a seasoned NFL veteran, they can rattle off responses to reporters as if in auto-pilot." Where is the honesty and genuine behavior of society's role models? The ability for a celebrity to go viral and to either ruin or boost their fan loyalty has mutated the sincerity in their actions and words. As society, are we supposed to assume that celebrities are truthful or that they act in a way or say something to gain Twitter followers.

 

Although celebrities are only a mere fraction of society, the trait remains to the average socialite. If you want to get fifty likes on an instagram photo, you are going to upload something that may not be entirely true to you. To loose a sense of truth is scary.

 

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Facebook's 'dark side': study finds link to socially aggressive narcissism

Facebook's 'dark side': study finds link to socially aggressive narcissism | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it
Psychology paper finds Facebook and other social media offer platform for obsessions with self-image and shallow friendships...

Via jean lievens
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

Here, we are introduced to think about whether or not this trend, or epidemic, is an American-focused concern or if it is worldwide. As social media is obviously globalized, has it had the same effect overseas as it has in America? Based on my travels abroad, I would argue that this trend is mainly Americanized.

 

Secondly, this article suggests that Facebook's socially beneficial aspects have been overshown by its harmful aspects. More research on Facebook can help to determine such contrasting ideas.

 

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Is Social Media to Blame for the Rise in Narcissism? | HuffPost

Is Social Media to Blame for the Rise in Narcissism? | HuffPost | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it
Studies are now showing what many of you may have suspected: We are living in an increasingly narcissistic society.

 

...Perhaps more troubling, a handful of new studies comparing traits and life goals of young people in high school and college today with those of Gen-Xers and baby boomers at the same age, show an increase in extrinsic values rather than intrinsic values. Millennials are more likely to value money, image and fame over community, affiliation and self-acceptance.

 

So who's to blame for this generational increase in narcissism?

 

Can we pin the tail on Mark Zuckerberg and the advent of Facebook? Over the last couple years, a plethora of research has been pouring in that makes connections between Facebook and narcissism. Studies are consistently finding that people who score higher on the Narcissistic Personality Inventory questionnaire tend to have more friends on Facebook, tag themselves more often in photos and update their statuses more frequently. According to Laura Buffadi, a postdoctoral researcher at the Universidad de Dueto in Bilbao, Spain, "Narcissists use Facebook and other social networking sites because they believe others are interested in what they're doing, and they want others to know what they are doing."

 

In general, social media websites encourage self-promotion, as users generate all of the content. W. Keith Campbell explains that people often utilize Facebook "to look important, look special and to gain attention and status and self-esteem." The trouble with this aspect of social networking is that nearly everyone presents an unrealistic portrait of themselves. Just as people select the most attractive photos of themselves to use as profile pictures, they tend to populate their newsfeeds with the most attractive bits of news about themselves. Of course, this is not always the case, but the unrealistically sunny picture that so many social networkers paint can have a negative psychological effect on their friends or followers.

 

Recent studies of undergraduates across the country have shown that "students who were more involved with Facebook were more likely to think other people's lives were happier and better." These heavy Facebook users were also more likely to negatively compare themselves to others and feel worse about themselves.

 

While Facebook is certainly a platform for narcissists, it is a mistake to assume that Facebook alone has caused this spike in narcissism. As researcher Shawn Bergman pointed out, "There is a significant amount of psychological research that shows that one's personality is fairly well-established by age 7," given that Facebook's policy doesn't allow users to register until age 13 "the personality traits of typical users are fairly well-ingrained by the time they get on a social network."...

 

[Much more interesting speculation in this post. And I thought it was all due to TV and video game violence or cell phone EMFs ;-) ~ Jeff]


Via Jeff Domansky
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

Is Generation Me an epidemic? Or is it the OVER self-esteem pushing of role models causing an increase in narcissism?

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Rescooped by Maggie Giuffrida from The 21st Century
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University of Michigan study links social media and narcissism

University of Michigan study links social media and narcissism | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it
For those Americans unnerved by the popularity of social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter , a new study from the University of Michigan will come as little surprise. And it might even add some smugness.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

College students use Twitter & adults use Facebook - they both are searching for approval from their "circle." Maybe it is not just Gen Y'ers but instead just people TODAY. Or to think, college students use Twitter to microphone their lives to the masses & adults use Facebook to seek approval from their already determined "circle of friends." Is there a difference? Absolutely. Approval from legitimate & physical friends has been at the core of maturity for many generations. Today, approval comes from paid advertising accounts sharing hash tags.

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Andreas Kuswara's curator insight, June 11, 2013 9:15 PM

Curious how they got the ethics approval for that, especially the second part of the study; considering the subject of the study, they probably have the least problem compared to the board of ethics.

 

It’s not surprising I supposed, but interesting to see the deeper findings and the difference on age group, gender, cultural background probably. In the place where culture collides, the internet or social network we call it now, do they collide and disappear? Blending one with the other? or different people take things differently. 

Andreas Kuswara's comment, June 11, 2013 9:16 PM
would be interesting to see what they (the supposed to be narcissists) view about privacy? since narcissism is .. in a way contradictive with privacy. isn't it? or not really?
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Social Media Is a Narcissism Enabler - Room for Debate

Social Media Is a Narcissism Enabler - Room for Debate | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it
Narcissism clearly leads to more social media use, social media use leads to positive self-views, and people who need a self-esteem boost turn to social media. By Jean Twenge.
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

"Narcissism clearly leads to more social media use, social media use leads to positive self-views, and people who need a self-esteem boost turn to social media." So, does narcissism lead to more social media use OR does the non-stop obsession with "likes" on social media lead to narcissism? I believe the later. 

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A Foodie Startup Nixes Web for Brick-and-Mortar Shop - Entrepreneur

A Foodie Startup Nixes Web for Brick-and-Mortar Shop - Entrepreneur | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it
A Foodie Startup Nixes Web for Brick-and-Mortar Shop Entrepreneur Walk into Freshfully, a local food market in Birmingham, Ala.'s revitalized Avondale district and, depending on the time of year, you'll see bins overflowing with fresh tomatoes,...

Via Skip Boykin
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Rescooped by Maggie Giuffrida from Composing Digital Media
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I’m Thinking. Please. Be Quiet.

I’m Thinking. Please. Be Quiet. | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it
Noise is the supreme archenemy of all serious thinkers.

Via Ali Patterson
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Rescooped by Maggie Giuffrida from Does social media affect our face-to-face communication with each other?
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The Effects of Social Media on Teenagers - SociallyActive

The Effects of Social Media on Teenagers - SociallyActive | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it
What are the negative effects of Social Media on Teenagers? Is it all bad, or can there be positive effects of Social Media as well?

Via Jesse Arriaga
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

Younger teenagers are lacking the development of social skills. It is easier to like a boy's facebook profile picture than to spark conversation in the lunch room. Young teenagers are more confident online than in any other facet of their lives. This is a horribly negative effect on society and predicts negative effects.

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Jesse Arriaga's curator insight, May 31, 2013 6:43 PM

According to this article, social media has a big impact on our children, especially if parents do not control what their children see, post or share with the rest of society. From this article we learn that more than 80% of American youth have access to any social media site because they use texting, posting on Facebook or Twitter, and sending email, etc… Using too much social media can create a negative impact on their face-to-face social skills, and expose them to widespread problems like internet bullying. Teens also experience side effects if they are plugged into social media for too many long periods of time. One thing we shouldn’t forget is that parents of plugged-in teens have the authority or responsibility to create some boundaries for their children. For example, a parent can be more involved in what their children post or see over the internet, and a parent can control how much time a teen or child has access to the internet or social media sites. With both the parents’ participation and the children’s participation, social media is not as bad as it looks.

lmattern's curator insight, September 24, 2013 10:06 AM

Read it...

lmattern's curator insight, September 24, 2013 10:07 AM

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Rescooped by Maggie Giuffrida from Social media and the Internet
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Social media plays large part in self image - FIUSM

Social media plays large part in self image
FIUSM
To say that social media has become a vital part of everyday life would be the understatement of the century.

Via imaginetsa
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

“I am highly disturbed that a digital thumb up has the ability to fill a highly visceral void manifesting within me with the same level of compassion that say, a compliment, hug, or, heck, confession of undying love could." 

 

This study has revealed that this spike in obsessive attention-crave leads to a loss in social control. Weight gain, lower credit score & an increase in debt are notable effects of this lack in social control. People have the ability to create an ideal self in virtual space and arguably have been living their lives as their real self less. There has historically been the dispute between one's ideal and real self, both in the physical sense. How has the "virtual" ideal self added to the complexity of this dispute. I wonder what future psychologists will think when researching current behavior.

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The Internet 'Narcissism Epidemic'

The Internet 'Narcissism Epidemic' | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it

We are in the midst of a "narcissism epidemic," concluded psychologists Jean M. Twnege and W. Keith Campbell in their 2009 book. One study they describe showed that among a group of 37,000 college students, narcissistic personality traits rose just as quickly as obesity from the 1980s to the present. Fortunately for narcissists, the continued explosion of social networking has provided them with productivity tools to continually expand their reach -- the likes of Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Foursquare, and occasionally Google Plus.


Via The Learning Factor
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

This artcile addresses those who are not trending towards narcissism but are "normal." I think it is important to realize that social media is used for many businesses. The same tactics used to gain followers and to feed one's narcissistic ego are relatively similar to those tactics used by a company to build their brand awareness and coordinate events. Likewise, many communities (educational, social, family-related) use social media to stay connected. Social media therefore cannot be entirely criticized.

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Maggie Giuffrida's curator insight, October 1, 2013 6:37 PM

Narcissism is greater in Gen Y'ers than any previous generations. Gen X'ers are doomed...

Savannah Powell's curator insight, March 25, 2014 2:38 AM

In this article, like many dealing with narcissism, it links the need for social media popularity with full-blown narcissism.  Although I agree that narcissists are seeking for attention constantly, and that social media definitely feeds it, I don't think everyone looking for a 'like' via social media is a narcissist.  It's just all on the continuum.

Nestor Laigo's curator insight, February 29, 3:10 PM

For Current Events:

I couldn’t agree more on this matter of rising narcissism as an epidemic, similar aspects as my op-ed that immorality is becoming a social norm, and how our moral standards are declining. I also agree that the dramatic rise of narcissism in society is due to social networking. "As we get accustomed to having even our most minor needs ... accommodated to this degree, we are growing more needy and more entitled. In other words, more narcissistic." (Davidow) My insight on Davidow’s saying that it’s as any other thing in this world, once a momentarily/fake happiness is felt, one is going to want it more and more. Davidow also goes on saying “In virtual space many of the physical interactions that restrain behavior vanish. Delusions of grandeur, narcissism, viciousness, impulsivity, and infantile behavior for some individuals rise to the surface. Fortunately for narcissists, the continued explosion of social networking has provided them with productivity tools to continually expand their reach…” (Davidow) Truly an epidemic, I agree, that immorality the most contagious disease, growing stronger and stronger, and there seems to be no cure.

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#Me: Instagram Narcissism And The Scourge Of The Selfie

#Me: Instagram Narcissism And The Scourge Of The Selfie | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it

Those of us who use Instagram everyday like to think of it in glowing terms. Not only is it a rapidly-growing social media success story, but it's a place where we can go to see gorgeous, often creatively composed imagery. Our friends are there, documenting their world for us and reliably tapping the Like button every time we share our own photos. It's awesome.

That is, until you take a step back and look around.


Via Mario Pires
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

900 MILLION SELFIES AND COUNTING.... THE THIRD MOST FREQUENTLY USED HASHTAG ON INSTAGRAM IS "#ME." Just wow.

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Rescooped by Maggie Giuffrida from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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The Internet 'Narcissism Epidemic'

The Internet 'Narcissism Epidemic' | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it

We are in the midst of a "narcissism epidemic," concluded psychologists Jean M. Twnege and W. Keith Campbell in their 2009 book. One study they describe showed that among a group of 37,000 college students, narcissistic personality traits rose just as quickly as obesity from the 1980s to the present. Fortunately for narcissists, the continued explosion of social networking has provided them with productivity tools to continually expand their reach -- the likes of Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Foursquare, and occasionally Google Plus.


Via The Learning Factor
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

Narcissism is greater in Gen Y'ers than any previous generations. Gen X'ers are doomed...

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Maggie Giuffrida's curator insight, October 14, 2013 9:47 PM

This artcile addresses those who are not trending towards narcissism but are "normal." I think it is important to realize that social media is used for many businesses. The same tactics used to gain followers and to feed one's narcissistic ego are relatively similar to those tactics used by a company to build their brand awareness and coordinate events. Likewise, many communities (educational, social, family-related) use social media to stay connected. Social media therefore cannot be entirely criticized.

Savannah Powell's curator insight, March 25, 2014 2:38 AM

In this article, like many dealing with narcissism, it links the need for social media popularity with full-blown narcissism.  Although I agree that narcissists are seeking for attention constantly, and that social media definitely feeds it, I don't think everyone looking for a 'like' via social media is a narcissist.  It's just all on the continuum.

Nestor Laigo's curator insight, February 29, 3:10 PM

For Current Events:

I couldn’t agree more on this matter of rising narcissism as an epidemic, similar aspects as my op-ed that immorality is becoming a social norm, and how our moral standards are declining. I also agree that the dramatic rise of narcissism in society is due to social networking. "As we get accustomed to having even our most minor needs ... accommodated to this degree, we are growing more needy and more entitled. In other words, more narcissistic." (Davidow) My insight on Davidow’s saying that it’s as any other thing in this world, once a momentarily/fake happiness is felt, one is going to want it more and more. Davidow also goes on saying “In virtual space many of the physical interactions that restrain behavior vanish. Delusions of grandeur, narcissism, viciousness, impulsivity, and infantile behavior for some individuals rise to the surface. Fortunately for narcissists, the continued explosion of social networking has provided them with productivity tools to continually expand their reach…” (Davidow) Truly an epidemic, I agree, that immorality the most contagious disease, growing stronger and stronger, and there seems to be no cure.

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You're so vain: Study links social media and narcissism

You're so vain: Study links social media and narcissism | Self Image & Narcissism | Scoop.it

"Facebook is a mirror and Twitter is a megaphone, according to a new University of Michigan study exploring how social media reflect and amplify the culture's growing levels of narcissism..."

©


Via Leona Ungerer
Maggie Giuffrida's insight:

"Facebook is a mirror and Twitter is a megaphone..." SO TRUE! When did creative & innocent sharing on social media ferment in a bogus sense of fufillment?

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Savannah Powell's curator insight, March 25, 2014 2:41 AM

I found this site's reason for linking social media and narcissism much more intriguing compared to the other articles that I read. Although others had previously said that narcissists would use social media more frequently in order to gain the attention that they seek, I thought it was really inventive the way that they decided to study it.  By comparing how much time they spend posting vs. how much time they spend looking at others' posts, I think that's a much better view of actually looking at what narcissism is about.

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FTP Guide for Pitt Composing Digital Media Class

afs/pitt.edu/home/(first letter, first name)/(first letter, last name)/(username)/public/html/ Example: /afs/pitt.edu/home/a/m/amm260/public/html/ Skype: li...
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