Engage with Asia
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Engage with Asia
Ideas for links to the  Asia and Australia's Engagement with Asia cross curricular priority of the Australian Curriculum.
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Why don’t Australians study Chinese?

Why don’t Australians study Chinese? | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
The low levels of Chinese language education in Australia is both surprising and disheartening given the enormous amount of attention the Sino–Australian relationship receives from Australian political and business leaders. Jane Orton has highlighted the decline of Chinese language education in Australia and her most recent findings are disheartening.
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We shouldn't neglect our Asian backyard

We shouldn't neglect our Asian backyard | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Three decades ago, we were told greater facility in Asian languages was essential to our future. A 1987 Asian Studies Council blueprint for the study of Asian languages from kindergarten to university was, according to its distinguished chairman Stephen FitzGerald, going to change the whole "intellectual and cultural horizon of Australians".

Yet the reality today is far less encouraging. According to the Asia Education Foundation, the proportion of Year 12 students studying a foreign language has dropped from 40 per cent in the 1960s to about 10 per cent in the present school year. And as the Asian White Paper lamented in 2012, the share of students studying Asian languages "is small and has fallen in recent times".
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It’s time SA learned more about China

It’s time SA learned more about China | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
According to Dr Jane Orton from Melbourne University, just 130 or less Australians of non-Chinese background speaking level can hold a business meeting fluently in Mandarin and of that amount less than half are under 55.

How on earth can you say South Australia is ready for China when so few people even understand the language?

How many of China’s 12 cities in China with a population of 10 million or more can most Australians name?
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Click onto the title to read the full article

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Chinese tourists spend record amounts in Australia

Chinese tourists spend record amounts in Australia | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
"Surveys of Chinese shoppers show they want (language) signs, the company of other Chinese and someone who can help them while they're shopping," the report said.

Mr Johnson reiterated the need for Australian stores to do this, but also offer Union Pay, which is China's most popular credit card.

But, Tourism Australia managing director, John O'Sullivan, disagreed with Mr Johnson's analysis.

"To actually singularly say because every shop in Sydney doesn't have a Mandarin speaker behind the counter all of a sudden this market is going to decline, it's a bit erroneous and quite simplistic," he told The Business.
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Wherever there is a real need/demand there is an opportunity for a meaningful/purposeful learning task.

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Lateline - 01/06/2016: Will the controversial decision to lease the port of Darwin to a Chinese company have an impact on the federal election?

Lateline - 01/06/2016: Will the controversial decision to lease the port of Darwin to a Chinese company have an impact on the federal election? | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Lateline heads to the Northern Territory to find out whats likely to influence voters at the upcoming election and finds that the issue of the port sale is a key issue
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The Power of Proximity – Australia’s next wave of global engagement in the Asian Century

The Power of Proximity – Australia’s next wave of global engagement in the Asian Century | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it

Whilst the first waves of our engagement with Asia have been focused on ‘rocks and crops’ (mining and agriculture), steel and iron ore, and pumping LNG offshore to the region, services will now play a more important role. ‘Rocks and crops’ will continue to provide the lion’s share of our export revenue to Asia – but our ‘points of engagement’ with Asia will expand as services trade promotes broader and deeper people-to-people relationships. Second tier cities in China like Chongqing and Chengdu are full of Australian architects and engineers, are parts of India, Mongolia, Kazakhstan and South East Asia. We also need to raise the export orientation of ‘crops’ (agribusiness) side of rocks and crops so Australia can move ‘from the mining boom to the dining boom’.

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Pine and Prejudice

Pine and Prejudice | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
History can whisper its secrets to us in the most unexpected places. In this story, a puzzling message on the back of an old dressing table provides the clue—unravelling a shameful chapter in Australian history and its impact on one family.
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ANU Asian language budget cuts see top academics placed on fixed-term contracts

ANU Asian language budget cuts see top academics placed on fixed-term contracts | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Esteemed international language scholar and Sanskrit expert McComas Taylor is considering leaving the Australian National University after being told he and five other senior language academics will be forced onto three-year contracts.

The National Tertiary Education Union last week notified ANU management of a formal dispute under the Enterprise Agreement relating to staff and budget cuts within the School of Culture, History and Languages within the College of Asia and the Pacific.
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Sad news for Asian languages education.  Especially in light of ACARA having just launched an Australian Curriculum for Hindi, Vietnamese (F-10) and a Framework for Classical Language soon to follow (Sanskrit could use into this framework). Why axe Javanese... the dominant regional language of our nearest neighbour and spoken by over 80 million!!!

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Australians are too lazy to master Chinese

Australians are too lazy to master Chinese | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Australia needs far more speakers with at least a basic proficiency in Chinese if it is to make the most of growing trade and cultural links with the Asia
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Click the title for the full article written by Jane Orton

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How did Southeast Asia become a social fact?

How did Southeast Asia become a social fact? | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Tom Pepinsky looks at how an artificial concept defined a region.

The first principle of Southeast Asian studies is the very artificiality of the concept of Southeast Asia. I have called this the “fundamental anxiety” of Southeast Asian studies — that there is no coherent argument why Southeast Asia properly includes Burma but not Bangladesh or Sri Lanka, or why it includes Indonesia but not Papua New Guinea, why Vietnam ought to fall within Southeast Asia rather than East Asia.

And yet Southeast Asia does exist. It is now a social fact. For example, Google knows exactly what Southeast Asia is and what it is is not.
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cultural-connections-teachers-resource.pdf


Via Maree Whiteley
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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, January 17, 8:22 AM
Cultural Connections’ draws from a range of diverse material to provide rich content for Australian teachers and educators seeking to add a global perspective to their classroom. Fabulous links to AC and wonderful inquiry-based activities.
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Isolated Chinese students need a warmer welcome

Isolated Chinese students need a warmer welcome | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
For too long international students, particularly from China, have been considered the cash cows of the Australian higher education system. It is time universities and the government moved past this transactional approach to one which pays greater attention to longer term interests. Doing so would improve the educational experience for many Chinese international students and promote the Australian national interest. Improving the experience of international students would also help to ensure the long-term health of Australia's higher education sector amid ever-increasing international competition. Incentivising universities to better engage with Chinese students should be a focus of the federal government's forthcoming National Strategy for International Education.
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What the Chinese-born head of PwC people discovered about getting ahead in the West

What the Chinese-born head of PwC people discovered about getting ahead in the West | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Firms in Australia are increasingly conscious of the need to develop and promote their Asian-background people. This encourages a healthy diversity of thought and approach and gives insight into lucrative markets. It also is an attempt to reflect the cultural make-up of workforce and the communities they operate in.
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China to send teachers to NT

China to send teachers to NT | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Twenty Chinese teachers are set to call the NT home from July next year.

The deal, which is in the final stages of discussions, will see four Chinese teachers spend a year teaching in Territory public schools over five years fro July 2017.

Education Department acting chief executive Vicki Baylis said the deal would be struck soon with the Hanban Institute — China’s equivalent of the Education Department.

Selected educators will have an obligation to spend a year in the Territory before deciding whether they want to stay or return to China. “There’s an opportunity for some who wish to stay to be able to then access a scholarship program for them to be able to become registered teachers, in an Australian sense,” she said.
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How can we fix Australia's Indonesia anxiety?

How can we fix Australia's Indonesia anxiety? | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Australians have long been ambivalent towards Indonesia. They want a good relationship with Indonesia and disapprove when the government fails to maintain this. But they are also wary and often anxious about Indonesia. Only a small minority of Australians feel close to or knowledgeable about the country.

Tackling this ambivalence is seemingly becoming harder due to changes in both nations. Within Australia, Indonesian literacy is falling. Fewer Australians learn Indonesian than probably at any time in the past half-century. And there is little Indonesian content in the general school curriculum.

Meanwhile, Indonesia is growing faster than Australia and is likely to surpass Australian on many economic indicators in the next decade or so. Prior Australian notions of their country being more important in the bilateral relationship and the world will be less credible.

So how is Australia to face these issues of anxiety, hoped-for amity, and the shifting balance between the two countries?
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Difference Differently - Be The Bridge

Difference Differently - Be The Bridge | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
These learning activities are designed to be used with the video Be the Bridge. They have been developed with reference to the Australian Curriculum, particularly for English at Years 9 and 10. Curriculum links are provided below.

Via Maree Whiteley
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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, August 24, 4:50 AM
This is awesome...NEW Educational Video + Learning Resources Now Live! Check out our new 'Be The Bridge' video, in which eleven people from diverse religious and cultural backgrounds have come together for a day to try to "Be the Bridge" between people from their own background and those who are different to themselves. Video and teaching resources with curriculum links available here:
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Journey Through History: Makassar to Arnhem Land

The Muslims from Makassar (South Sulawesi) had been visiting Australia's north since the 1600s. The harmonious contact between the Makassans and the Aboriginals brought about mutual benefits as well as ongoing friendships...
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Motley Fool: Why the Chinese want a chunk of Virgin

Motley Fool: Why the Chinese want a chunk of Virgin | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Now, both Virgin and HNA are going to benefit from the growth in traffic, but if the future is anything like the past, additional traffic will simply lead to increased airline capacity and losses for the carriers.
...But don't miss the opportunities elsewhere

But just as the airport owners benefit far more from growing airline traffic than the airlines do, the surge in traveller numbers should be of interest to all investors – there's going to be a bigger pie, so it pays to have a think about how the pie will be divided.

The most obvious – for good reason – beneficiary is likely to be the Australian tourism sector. More visitors means more room nights in hotels, more visitors to attractions and more money being spent in gift shops around the country. The clever operators will make sure they're ready, with appropriate marketing, products, staff and yes, language skills. Mantra is one company sitting in the box seat when it comes to hotels and Ardent Leisure's theme parks should also see a steady growth in patronage.
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ANU Asian languages staff restored to their appointments

ANU Asian languages staff restored to their appointments | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it

Award-winning international Sanskrit expert McComas Taylor welcomed the changes.

"My colleagues and I are delighted that ANU has publicly committed to supporting Asian languages in the long term. We are looking forward to working with ANU management to really develop our role as the national Asian language provider for Australia and beyond, and we want to strengthen the university's excellent reputation. Of course our relief is tempered by concern about potential cuts to other areas."

Professor Taylor was considering his future at the ANU under the previous plan to place him and others on fixed-term contracts, saying it would irreparably damage the university's ability to carry out its national functions of engaging in the region.

Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

Phew!!!!

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Pine and Prejudice

Pine and Prejudice | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
History can whisper its secrets to us in the most unexpected places. In this story, a puzzling message on the back of an old dressing table provides the clue—unravelling a shameful chapter in Australian history and its impact on one family.
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Embracing Asia means building long-term relationships

Embracing Asia means building long-term relationships | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Australian business can look forward to unprecedented growth in Asia over the next 20 to 25 years if it's willing to embrace the region more wholeheartedly.
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North Of Capricorn

North Of Capricorn | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Australia's great divide is not between the city and the bush. It is between the North and the South. Looking at Australia from the top down changes the whole story of our nations history.
Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

On Australia's cultural identity and role in Asia region. Catch up on SBS on demand for another 30 days. Watching this reminded of an excellent book by Peta Stephenson "The Outsiders Within" which explores the three-way relationship between Aboriginal, Asian and white Australians.

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Connecting Students to the World | AISWA

Connecting Students to the World | AISWA | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it

A whole-day workshop that provides teachers with the opportunity to share and explore curriculum resources and classroom programs that develop students' global competence, knowledge and understanding of Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia.

Presenter: Lottie Dowling from the Asia Education Foundation.

Kate Reitzenstein's insight:

This is a whole day workshop held on Friday 22 April at Scotch College (During the April school holidays). Schools are encouraged to register a group of teachers to develop their whole school approach to Asia literacy. Click on the title for more information and to register.

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Our complex relationship with Chinese Australians

Our complex relationship with Chinese Australians | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it
Of the 6.6 million Australian residents born overseas, about 8 per cent hail from mainland China and Hong Kong, Australian Bureau of Statistics figures for June 2014 show.

Chinese students account for another 150,000 or so, while there are many other first-, second- and third-generation Australian-Chinese from China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Malaysia and Singapore and even a smattering of descendants from the first wave of arrivals during the gold rush of the mid- to late-19th century. In the 2011 Census, Mandarin surpassed ­Italian as the most-spoken language in ­Australia after English.

Conversely, Mandarin teaching is increasingly on offer in high schools around the country, something identified by successive federal governments as crucial to the country's engagement with China.
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Living with our neighbours

Living with our neighbours | Engage with Asia | Scoop.it

The British were not the first visitors to Australia. In 1606, long before British colonisation, both Dutch and Spanish sailing vessels were within sight of the Australian coast, but neither made contact with the land. In 1623 another Dutch vessel, captained by Willem van Colster, made contact with Yolngu on the Arnhem coast. This is the first recorded European contact with Aboriginal people in the area.


Via Asia Education Foundation
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