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Rescooped by Hans De Keulenaer from Digital Sustainability
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Global Climate at Risk as Nearly 1,200 New Coal Plants Proposed

Global Climate at Risk as Nearly 1,200 New Coal Plants Proposed | Sustainable Energy | Scoop.it

The World Resources Institute (WRI) released a report, Global Coal Risk Assessment, that analyzes information about proposed new coal-fired plants and other market trends in order to assess potential future risks to the global climate.

The report finds that there are 1,199 new coal power plants in the works, totaling more than 1.4 million megawatts of capacity worldwide. That’s four times the capacity of all the coal-fired power plants in the U.S. Seventy-six percent of the coal plants are proposed for India and China, with the U.S. seventh in the world for coal power plants in development.
According to the WRI, if all of these projects are built, it would add new coal power capacity that is almost four times the current capacity of all coal-fired plants in the U.S.


View the locations of proposed coal-fired power plants by country in this interactive map at the article link.


Via Lauren Moss, Digital Sustainability
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Resource Insights: Fossil Fuels vs. Renewables: The Key Argument ...

Resource Insights: Fossil Fuels vs. Renewables: The Key Argument ... | Sustainable Energy | Scoop.it

It turns out, however, that what most environmentalists know about the future supply of natural gas and other fossil fuels is based more on industry hype than on actual data. And, that means that they are missing a key argument in their discussions about renewable energy, one that could be used to persuade those less concerned about pollution and climate change and more concerned about energy security: There is increasing evidence that no fossil fuel will continue to see its rate of production climb significantly in the decades ahead and so none of them is a viable "bridge fuel," not natural gas, not oil, not coal. This means that global society must leap over fossil fuels and move directly to renewables as quickly as possible. In advanced economies this leap must be combined with a program of radical reductions in energy use, reductions which are achievable using known technologies and practices.

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