endurance-independent reading
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Endurance

Endurance | endurance-independent reading | Scoop.it

The astonishing saga of polar explorer Ernest Shackleton's survival for over a year on the ice-bound Antarctic seas, as Time magazine put it, "defined heroism." Alfred Lansing's scrupulously researched and brilliantly narrated book -- with over 200,000 copies sold -- has long been acknowledged as the definitive account of the Endurance's fateful trip. To write their authoritative story, Lansing consulted with ten of the surviving members and gained access to diaries and personal accounts by eight others. The resulting book has all the immediacy of a first-hand account, expanded with maps and illustrations especially for this edition.

Will's insight:

            Shackleton's incredible voyage was a massive expedition with a 28 person crew. On the way to Antarctica the Endurance became stuck in a ice pack miles from the coast. Unfortunately after many weeks of being stuck in the ice and many attempts to free the ship the ship feel victim to the ship-crushing ice. Soon It became apparent that the ship was irreparable Shackleton gave the order to abandon ship. After the ship was abandon the real story begins, the crew of the Endurance had to battle the Antarctic climate just to survive the on the ice. Even though the crew had sled dogs the transporting of supplies was not easy. The crew also had to pull the ships life boats in order to ensure that they could cross water in the future. As a result the expedition became much more difficult because each ship weighed close to a ton. The book also vividly depicts how difficult it was for the crew of the endurance to kill and eat their dogs, a step necessary for all of his crew to survive the voyage. I think it is incredible for people to survive.

          The main theme of the story is learning how to overcome incredible obstacles with team work. Shackleton, the main character of the novel and lead of the expedition, and wanted to travel across the Antarctic continent. Then When the ship became stuck in the ice floe of the coast of Antarctica it becomes apparent to him that he was responsible for the safe passage of his 28 crew members.

          In my opinion I think that the story of Shackleton and the crew of the endurance should be read by everyone, because early exploration is a very interesting topic for books. Also the voyage of the endurance is possibly the most well documented early twentieth century expeditions ever. Shackleton in fact employed a professional photographer to document the entire voyage and as a result there are hundreds of photos and hours of film about the endurance and her crew.

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Brandon's comment, April 17, 2013 9:07 AM
I think that it would be a very hard journey for them. To go out into the wilderness and not know what will happen next.
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Reliving Shackleton's Epic Endurance Expedition

Reliving Shackleton's Epic <em>Endurance Expedition</em> | endurance-independent reading | Scoop.it
Tim Jarvis's Plan to Cross the Antarctic in an Exact Replica of the James Caird
Will's insight:

This web source has specific Information about Shackletons last expedition that was not found in the book or documentary. For example, the web source directly quotes the add in a newspaper for recruiting his crew. “Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honor and recognition in event of success.” This shows us that Shackleton was really looking for the best people for the voyage.

 In the book it talks about how hundreds of people applied for the expedition, but it never described the advertisement itself. In the book the crew that Shackleton picked worked incredibly well together, in fact they still worked as a team even when the future looked very grim.

 

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The Titanic

The Titanic | endurance-independent reading | Scoop.it

In the realm of popular culture, the Titanic has turned out to be more than just a ship that sank; it has become an icon of an era long past, as well as a contemporary phenomenon. It seems that each generation since the sinking has rediscovered the shipwreck in new books, movies, and even music.

 

Will's insight:

         The sinking of the titanic was possibly the most famous ship sinking in history. The builders of the titanic considered her unsinkable. As a result they constructed her with few life boats. When the ship was finally it was the biggest ocean liner in history. On its madden voyage the titanic hit an iceberg in the Atlantic ocean, passengers were in disbelief, unfortunately for them The constructors of the ship never thought the Titanic would sink and therefore did not put enough life boats on the ship.

        The titanic and the Endurance were both considered to be invincible ships. The titanic was considered so because of its incredible size, and the endurance because of incredibly thick hull made of the best possible materials. A quote from the endurance shows how well built the Endurance was."Her keel members were four pieces of solid oak, one above the other, adding up to a total thickness of over seven feet..Her sides varied in thickness from eighteen inches to two and a half feet"(Lansing 19). as a result no one thought that either ships were going to sink. both ships suffered a death from ice, the titanic hit an iceberg, and the Endurance was crushed by the ice floes of Antarctic sea.

 

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Brandon's comment, April 12, 2013 9:30 AM
Both the sailers on boat ships had to fight for their lives and others.
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The Endurance

The Endurance | endurance-independent reading | Scoop.it
Will's insight:

The endurance was stuck in the ice just miles from the coast of Antarctica. After some time the ice started to shift, unfortunately not in the ships favor, and it became apparent to Shackleton and his crew that the ship was irreparable. Relatively close to this moment Shackleton gave the order to abandon ship because of the Endurances poor condition.

 This photo directly ties to the novel because during the passage of the endurance hundreds of photos were taken of the ship and her crew. The novel also features photos of the ship similar to this example.

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Brandon's comment, April 17, 2013 9:05 AM
I think that this is a very difficult decision, to leave the safety of the ship and go into the wilderness or to stay with the ship. The world was uncertain.
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The Endurance (Full Documentary)

After failing to be the first to reach the South pole by only 97 miles in 1909, Shackleton set out to be the first to cross the Antarctic continent via the p...
Will's insight:

This documentary is accurate when compared to the novel but this documentary actually has film that was actually taken on the ship. Fortunately during the expedition, Shackleton hired a photographer to document the entire voyage. As a result the entire peril of the endurance was illustrated with hundreds of pictures as well as hours of filming this documentary. This film also shows that Shackleton was able to keep his crew as a team with close to no selfless acts. 

   

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Fatal Passage

Fatal Passage | endurance-independent reading | Scoop.it

John Rae's accomplishments, surpassing all nineteenth-century Arctic explorers, were worthy of honors and international fame. No explorer even approached Rae's prolific record: 1,776 miles surveyed of uncharted territory; 6,555 miles hiked on snowshoes; and 6,700 miles navigated in small boats. Yet, he was denied fair recognition of his discoveries because he dared to utter the truth about the fate of Sir John Franklin and his crew, Rae's predecessors in the far north. Author Ken McGoogan vividly narrates the astonishing adventures of Rae, who found the last link to the Northwest Passage and uncovered the grisly truth about the cannibalism of Franklin and his crew. A bitter smear campaign by Franklin's supporters would deny Rae his knighthood and bury him in ignominy for over one hundred and fifty years. Ken McGoogan's passion to secure justice for a true North American hero in this revelatory book produces a completely original and compelling portrait that elevates Rae to his rightful place as one of history's greatest explorers.

 

Will's insight:

"Fatal passage" is about John Rae's journeys across the Arctic. The author Ken McGoogan vividly narrates the expeditions of John Rae. Rae was the most well accomplished explorers of the nineteenth century. Rae accomplished some incredible feats; he surveyed more than seventeen hundred miles of uncharted area, hiked over six thousand miles, and almost traveled seven thousand miles in small boats. Rae also found the last link to the Northwest Passage. Rae was denied recognition because he discovered the cannibalistic fate of John Franklin and his crew.

   John Rae and Shackleton are similar because both explorers were leaders of their expedition. Both Shackleton and Rae were able to avoid mutiny and also keep their crew's moral high during long exploration expeditions. However, their voyages vary because Rae traveled to the North Pole and Shackleton traveled to the South Pole. 

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