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EndGameWatch
The Consolidation of the Elites over Earth's Remaining Resources. Watching the Tragedy of the Commons in Action.
Curated by Khannea Suntzu
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Los Angeles Is Finally Starting to Run Out of Water

Los Angeles Is Finally Starting to Run Out of Water | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
California's governor just declared a drought emergency after the state's driest year in recorded history. The lack of water will especially affect Los Angeles, which has been buying water for its 4 m…
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Are We On The Verge Of A Massive Emerging Markets Currency Collapse?

Are We On The Verge Of A Massive Emerging Markets Currency Collapse? | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
This time, the Federal Reserve has created a truly global problem.  A big chunk of the trillions of dollars that it pumped into the financial system over the
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A Human-Driven Mass Extinction: Good Or Bad?

A Human-Driven Mass Extinction: Good Or Bad? | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
Odds are good that there's a mass extinction going on right now. It will be only one of six in the entire history of the planet. In the past these
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20 Early Warning Signs That We Are Approaching A Global Economic Meltdown

In major cities all over the globe right now, there is looting, violence, shortages of basic supplies, and runs on the banks.
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Matt Drudge Issues Warning: “Have An Exit Plan”

Drudge is arguably the most influential media personality in the world. Garnering nearly one billion readers monthly, the Drudge Report is able ...
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Former top Deutsche Bank executive found hanged at his Kensington home

Former top Deutsche Bank executive found hanged at his Kensington home | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
The body of former senior manager William 'Bill' Broeksmit, 58, was discovered at his home on an exclusive road in South Kensington, central London.
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Is Being Self-Sufficient a Threat to Society? | The Daily Sheeple

Is Being Self-Sufficient a Threat to Society? | The Daily Sheeple | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
A central-planning society is incompatible with individual freedom, personal choice, self-sufficiency, and individuality, concepts upon which this country was founded.
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Why There's No Outcry

Khannea Suntzu's insight:

People ask me all the time why we don’t have a revolution in America, or at least a major wave of reform similar to that of the Progressive Era or the New Deal or the Great Society.

Middle incomes are sinking, the ranks of the poor are swelling, almost all the economic gains are going to the top, and big money is corrupting our democracy. So why isn’t there more of a ruckus?

The answer is complex, but three reasons stand out.

***
First, the working class is paralyzed with fear it will lose the jobs and wages it already has.

In earlier decades, the working class fomented reform. The labor movement led the charge for a minimum wage, 40-hour workweek, unemployment insurance, and Social Security.

No longer. Working people don’t dare. The share of working-age Americans holding jobs is now lower than at any time in the last three decades and 76 percent of them are living paycheck to paycheck.

No one has any job security. The last thing they want to do is make a fuss and risk losing the little they have.

Besides, their major means of organizing and protecting themselves — labor unions — have been decimated. Four decades ago more than a third of private-sector workers were unionized. Now, fewer than 7 percent belong to a union.

 

***
Second, students don’t dare rock the boat.

In prior decades students were a major force for social change. They played an active role in the Civil Rights movement, the Free Speech movement, and against the Vietnam War.

But today’s students don’t want to make a ruckus. They’re laden with debt. Since 1999, student debt has increased more than 500 percent, yet the average starting salary for graduates has dropped 10 percent, adjusted for inflation. Student debts can’t be cancelled in bankruptcy. A default brings penalties and ruins a credit rating.

To make matters worse, the job market for new graduates remains lousy. Which is why record numbers are still living at home.

Reformers and revolutionaries don’t look forward to living with mom and dad or worrying about credit ratings and job recommendations.

***
Third and finally, the American public has become so cynical about government that many no longer think reform is possible.

When asked if they believe government will do the right thing most of the time, fewer than 20 percent of Americans agree. Fifty years ago, when that question was first asked on standard surveys, more than 75 percent agreed.

It’s hard to get people worked up to change society or even to change a few laws when they don’t believe government can possibly work.

You’d have to posit a giant conspiracy in order to believe all this was the doing of the forces in America most resistant to positive social change.
 

It’s possible. of course, that rightwing Republicans,  corporate executives, and Wall Street moguls intentionally cut jobs and wages in order to cow average workers, buried students under so much debt they’d never take to the streets, and made most Americans so cynical about government they wouldn’t even try for change. 


But it’s more likely they merely allowed all this to unfold, like a giant wet blanket over the outrage and indignation most Americans feel but don’t express. 


Change is coming anyway. We cannot abide an ever-greater share of the nation’s income and wealth going to the top while median household incomes continue too drop, one out of five of our children living in dire poverty, and big money taking over our democracy.

At some point, working people, students, and the broad public will have had enough. They will reclaim our economy and our democracy. This has been the central lesson of American history.

Reform is less risky than revolution, but the longer we wait the more likely it will be the latter.

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Khannea Suntzu's curator insight, January 28, 2014 5:09 AM

People ask me all the time why we don’t have a revolution in America, or at least a major wave of reform similar to that of the Progressive Era or the New Deal or the Great Society.

Middle incomes are sinking, the ranks of the poor are swelling, almost all the economic gains are going to the top, and big money is corrupting our democracy. So why isn’t there more of a ruckus?

The answer is complex, but three reasons stand out.

***
First, the working class is paralyzed with fear it will lose the jobs and wages it already has.

In earlier decades, the working class fomented reform. The labor movement led the charge for a minimum wage, 40-hour workweek, unemployment insurance, and Social Security.

No longer. Working people don’t dare. The share of working-age Americans holding jobs is now lower than at any time in the last three decades and 76 percent of them are living paycheck to paycheck.

No one has any job security. The last thing they want to do is make a fuss and risk losing the little they have.

Besides, their major means of organizing and protecting themselves — labor unions — have been decimated. Four decades ago more than a third of private-sector workers were unionized. Now, fewer than 7 percent belong to a union.

 

***
Second, students don’t dare rock the boat.

In prior decades students were a major force for social change. They played an active role in the Civil Rights movement, the Free Speech movement, and against the Vietnam War.

But today’s students don’t want to make a ruckus. They’re laden with debt. Since 1999, student debt has increased more than 500 percent, yet the average starting salary for graduates has dropped 10 percent, adjusted for inflation. Student debts can’t be cancelled in bankruptcy. A default brings penalties and ruins a credit rating.

To make matters worse, the job market for new graduates remains lousy. Which is why record numbers are still living at home.

Reformers and revolutionaries don’t look forward to living with mom and dad or worrying about credit ratings and job recommendations.

***
Third and finally, the American public has become so cynical about government that many no longer think reform is possible.

When asked if they believe government will do the right thing most of the time, fewer than 20 percent of Americans agree. Fifty years ago, when that question was first asked on standard surveys, more than 75 percent agreed.

It’s hard to get people worked up to change society or even to change a few laws when they don’t believe government can possibly work.

You’d have to posit a giant conspiracy in order to believe all this was the doing of the forces in America most resistant to positive social change.
 

It’s possible. of course, that rightwing Republicans,  corporate executives, and Wall Street moguls intentionally cut jobs and wages in order to cow average workers, buried students under so much debt they’d never take to the streets, and made most Americans so cynical about government they wouldn’t even try for change. 


But it’s more likely they merely allowed all this to unfold, like a giant wet blanket over the outrage and indignation most Americans feel but don’t express. 


Change is coming anyway. We cannot abide an ever-greater share of the nation’s income and wealth going to the top while median household incomes continue too drop, one out of five of our children living in dire poverty, and big money taking over our democracy.

At some point, working people, students, and the broad public will have had enough. They will reclaim our economy and our democracy. This has been the central lesson of American history.

Reform is less risky than revolution, but the longer we wait the more likely it will be the latter.

Khannea Suntzu's curator insight, January 28, 2014 5:10 AM

People ask me all the time why we don’t have a revolution in America, or at least a major wave of reform similar to that of the Progressive Era or the New Deal or the Great Society.

Middle incomes are sinking, the ranks of the poor are swelling, almost all the economic gains are going to the top, and big money is corrupting our democracy. So why isn’t there more of a ruckus?

The answer is complex, but three reasons stand out.

***
First, the working class is paralyzed with fear it will lose the jobs and wages it already has.

In earlier decades, the working class fomented reform. The labor movement led the charge for a minimum wage, 40-hour workweek, unemployment insurance, and Social Security.

No longer. Working people don’t dare. The share of working-age Americans holding jobs is now lower than at any time in the last three decades and 76 percent of them are living paycheck to paycheck.

No one has any job security. The last thing they want to do is make a fuss and risk losing the little they have.

Besides, their major means of organizing and protecting themselves — labor unions — have been decimated. Four decades ago more than a third of private-sector workers were unionized. Now, fewer than 7 percent belong to a union.

 

***
Second, students don’t dare rock the boat.

In prior decades students were a major force for social change. They played an active role in the Civil Rights movement, the Free Speech movement, and against the Vietnam War.

But today’s students don’t want to make a ruckus. They’re laden with debt. Since 1999, student debt has increased more than 500 percent, yet the average starting salary for graduates has dropped 10 percent, adjusted for inflation. Student debts can’t be cancelled in bankruptcy. A default brings penalties and ruins a credit rating.

To make matters worse, the job market for new graduates remains lousy. Which is why record numbers are still living at home.

Reformers and revolutionaries don’t look forward to living with mom and dad or worrying about credit ratings and job recommendations.

***
Third and finally, the American public has become so cynical about government that many no longer think reform is possible.

When asked if they believe government will do the right thing most of the time, fewer than 20 percent of Americans agree. Fifty years ago, when that question was first asked on standard surveys, more than 75 percent agreed.

It’s hard to get people worked up to change society or even to change a few laws when they don’t believe government can possibly work.

You’d have to posit a giant conspiracy in order to believe all this was the doing of the forces in America most resistant to positive social change.
 

It’s possible. of course, that rightwing Republicans,  corporate executives, and Wall Street moguls intentionally cut jobs and wages in order to cow average workers, buried students under so much debt they’d never take to the streets, and made most Americans so cynical about government they wouldn’t even try for change. 


But it’s more likely they merely allowed all this to unfold, like a giant wet blanket over the outrage and indignation most Americans feel but don’t express. 


Change is coming anyway. We cannot abide an ever-greater share of the nation’s income and wealth going to the top while median household incomes continue too drop, one out of five of our children living in dire poverty, and big money taking over our democracy.

At some point, working people, students, and the broad public will have had enough. They will reclaim our economy and our democracy. This has been the central lesson of American history.

Reform is less risky than revolution, but the longer we wait the more likely it will be the latter.

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After the Collapse: Six Likely Events That Will Follow an Economic Crash

After the Collapse: Six Likely Events That Will Follow an Economic Crash | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
There will be numerous surprises—actions taken by governments that may be as unprecedented as they would be unlawful...
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Rise in ‘funeral poverty’ means more than 100,000 in UK cannot afford to die

Rise in ‘funeral poverty’ means more than 100,000 in UK cannot afford to die | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
Never mind the cost of living crisis – the rise of “funeral poverty” in Britain means more than 100,000 people will be unable to afford the cost of dying this year, researchers have said.
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Is This the Beginning of the End for the Dollar?

Is This the Beginning of the End for the Dollar? | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
Several observations by Sharps Pixley point to structural weakness in the dollar. In fact, the long anticipated decline of the dollar hegemony could be in front of us. The following five trends provide a confirmation of that.
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Mega Default In China Scheduled For January 31

Beijing may be allowing investors to lose 3.03 billion yuan at the end of this month.
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Republicans won the food stamp war

Republicans won the food stamp war | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
Congress is set to approve $9 billion in cuts to the food stamp program even as a record number of Americans live in poverty.
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Mitchell Boden's curator insight, January 29, 2014 10:25 PM

$11 Billion in cuts to the Food Stamp Program today.

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Contraception key in climate change fight: Gore and Gates

Contraception key in climate change fight: Gore and Gates | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it

"Depressing the rate of child mortality, educating girls, empowering women and making fertility management ubiquitously available ... is crucial to the future shape of human civilization," said Gore, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 for his work on global warming.

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Why Are Banking Executives In London Killing Themselves?

Why Are Banking Executives In London Killing Themselves? | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
Bankers committing suicide by jumping from the rooftops of their own banks is something that we think of when we think of the Great Depression. Only its now happening in London. Why?
Khannea Suntzu's insight:

Nothing happening here, move along, no conspiracy theories please.

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Why millions of Americans will never retire: How the prospect of retirement went from a realistic goal to an outrageous dream for most American families.

Why millions of Americans will never retire: How the prospect of retirement went from a realistic goal to an outrageous dream for most American families. | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
Retirement was presented to many Americans as some kind of middle class rite of passage.  It was odd to see so many fall under the spell of easy riches and generous retirement math presented to the public from the Wall Street financing machine.  Many saw retirement as a distant object so far into
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SHTF Plan - When the Shit Hits The Fan, Don't Say We Didn't Warn You.

SHTF Plan - When the Shit Hits The Fan, Don't Say We Didn't Warn You. | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
Economic news, survival and recession proofing your life.
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Massive Capital Flight Out of Developing Countries is Fueling Real-Time Global Financial Collapse...

I'm not sure why this isn't getting more attention in this forum, but the wheels of a major global financial collapse are in process this very moment. The tl;dr summary: credit is suddenly tightening due to slower economic growth in China and fears of Central Banks in Europe and the USA ending their "easy money" policies. The result? Massive capital flight by elites out of countless so-called "emerging markets" (read: poor countries) to supposedly safer countries such as Japan and the United States.
 

Here's the problem: currencies are dropping globally in these poorer countries, jacking up inflation and slowing economic growth as their populations cannot afford basic goods and services. Furthermore the countries are hamstrung since they must service outrageously high debts before implementing any temporary stop-gap spending to stimulate economic growth. The slower economic growth across billions of people across the world will likely fuel slower economic growth in the so-called "advanced economies" (that is, Europe, the USA, and the rest) as well as risk aversion by firms globally.


I've been following financial news (as a part-time adviser) for over a decade and this is looking bad, bad, bad. Argentina's currency is dropping more than it has in a decade; same for multiple other countries. The sheer scope of the capital flight is astounding: South Africa, Indonesia, Turkey, Argentina, Ukraine, Bulgaria, etc. This is going to make the 1998 Asian financial crisis look like a walk in the park.


The frustrating part? The easy credit policies of Central Banks are a chief culprit, since this has predictably fueled risky investments in the poorer countries of the world. Combined with zero capital controls (due to secret "free" trade deals), major firms can just yank capital out of these poorer countries, resulting in financial collapse.
 

It's going to be a CRAZY week ahead.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 29, 2014 5:36 AM

 Capital Flight Out of Developing Countries

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JP Morgan name man who plunged to his death as Gabriel Magee

JP Morgan name man who plunged to his death as Gabriel Magee | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
The American senior manager, 39, fell from the 33-storey skyscraper and was found on the ninth floor roof surrounding the London skyscraper.
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Are We On The Verge Of A Massive Emerging Markets Currency Collapse?

Are We On The Verge Of A Massive Emerging Markets Currency Collapse? | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
Emerging market currencies are taking a hard hit, with looming China default issues, which has spooked financial markets worldwide.
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The Big Reset, Part 1 | In Gold We Trust

The Big Reset, Part 1 | In Gold We Trust | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
After having written four books in Dutch, Middelkoop just released his latest book in English: The Big Reset. This book is about the War on Gold and...
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Kelly McParland: I don't worry about Edward Snowden. It's Google that scares me

Kelly McParland: I don't worry about Edward Snowden. It's Google that scares me | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
The same people who get exercised about the prospect of government's getting hold of their phone records are happy to hand Google a key to their private lives and an invitation to rummage around freely inside.
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Industry Awakens to Threat of Climate Change

Industry Awakens to Threat of Climate Change | EndGameWatch | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola and other corporations are starting to see global warming as an economically disruptive force affecting commodity costs and supply chains.
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