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End of the line
Lazy historian, champagne socialist, psychedelic philosopher and skeptical believer.
Curated by Kenneth Rowe
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NASA | Magnificent Eruption in Full HD

On August 31, 2012 a long filament of solar material that had been hovering in the sun's atmosphere, the corona, erupted out into space at 4:36 p.m. EDT. The coronal mass ejection, or CME, traveled away from the sun at over 900 miles per second. This movie shows the ejection from a variety of viewpoints as captured by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), and the joint ESA/NASA Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO).
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The Gladiator Graveyard

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Chewed Up Louis C.K.

The 2008 comedy Special for the comedian Louis CK the comedy king. Rated 8.4, recorded in March 1st 2008 in Boston, DVD is available on amazon.
Dedicated to all Louis CK Fans.
Please enjoy

 

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Lab-Grown Meat

Hank brings us the strange story of in vitro meat - muscle tissue grown in laboratories with the hope that someday we will eat it. Like SciShow: http://www.f...
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Jessica Wise: How fiction can change reality

Reading and stories can be an escape from real life, a window into another world -- but have you ever considered how new fictional experiences might change your perspective on real, everyday life? From Pride and Prejudice to Harry Potter, learn how popular fiction can spark public dialogue and shape culture.
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Immortal Technique | Eyes in the Sky

DOWNLOAD FULL ALBUM HERE: http://www.mediafire.com/?605ppzqsoajsubi Alternative Links: http://www.mediafire.com/?9crubh5wp9nbm9i http://www.megaupload.com/?d...
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Is there an afterlife? (FULL DEBATE)

Christopher Hitchens, Sam Harris, Rabbi David Wolpe, Rabbi Bradley Artson Shavit debate the idea of an afterlife.
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Pussy Riot on Putin, 'punk prayers' and superheroes - video

Three members of the Russian feminist punk group talk exclusively to the Observer about the moment they stormed into a Moscow cathedral...
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Mark Thomas On Coca Cola

Coca-Cola is one of the most iconic brands of both the 20th and 21st centuries, promoting itself as the drink of freedom, choice and US patriotism.
But behind this carefully crafted image exists a company accused of environmental damage, human rights violations and questionable business practices.

Political activist and journalist Mark Thomas travels to South America, India and the US to investigate the way in which Coca-Cola and its suppliers operate and the extent to which they upholds moral and ethical obligations.

Thomas, a long-term critic of Coca-Cola's more controversial practices, finds disturbing evidence which undermines its effervescent image as a force for good and which has prompted a global consumer backlash.
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Law and order: Blame it on the brain

Law and order: Blame it on the brain | End of the line | Scoop.it
Advances in neuroscience could transform our criminal justice systems. But the jury is out as to whether "my brain made me do it" will ever be accepted in court.

 

Grady Nelson had his life spared by a brain scan. In January 2005, after he was released from a Florida prison, where he had served time for the rape of his step-daughter, he returned home to stab his wife 60 times, slash her throat and slam a butcher’s knife into her head. He also stabbed his two stepchildren. The kids survived the attack, but his wife did not. Five years later, a jury in Miami voted against the death sentence for Nelson’s crimes. Instead, they narrowly voted to sentence him to life in prison.

The defence attorneys argued that Nelson had major brain defects that could explain his behaviour. To show this, they submitted as evidence brain activity measurements from a method known as a quantitative EEG (Q-EEG). In a standard EEG, electrodes placed on the scalp measure the electrical activity of the brain. The Q-EEG is similar, except that a computer analyses the data and identifies brain regions of unusual activity. Lawyers had previously tried without success to present such data in court, but this was the first time in the US that a judge presiding over a major case had allowed it.

Clearly, it did the trick. In comments to the press, John Howard, an airport fleet services worker and member of the jury, said he had been about to vote for execution when the Q-EEG evidence had reversed his decision. “The technology really swayed me,” he told a Miami newspaper. “After seeing the brain scans, I was convinced this guy had some sort of brain problem.”

Neuroscientific evidence is increasingly being introduced into legal courts around the world, and novel brain-imaging techniques and interpretations are at the forefront. These approaches may be powerful new tools that help juries and judges determine the culpability of an accused and identify serial criminals. It’s also beginning to influence the way society thinks about sentencing and the treatment of criminals. But learning more about the neurobiological underpinnings of behaviour is also raising uncomfortable questions about free will. On top of all that there are scores of scientists who are critical of the use of such evidence in court.

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Nuff said!

Nuff said! | End of the line | Scoop.it
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The Science of Lying

Hank gets into the dirty details behind our lying ways - how such behavior evolved, how pathological liars are different from the rest of us, and how scientists are getting better at spotting lies in many situations.
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catholic

catholic | End of the line | Scoop.it
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We Are Legion: The Story of the Hacktivists - Trailer

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The Fabric of the Cosmos1/4 - What Is Space.

Physicist Brian Greene reveals the fundamental structure and workings of our world in a 4 part documentary "The Fabric of the Cosmos" Part 1 as seen on NOVA ...
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The French Revolution: Crash Course World History #29

In which John Green examines the French Revolution, and gets into how and why it differed from the American Revolution. Was it the serial authoritarian regimes? The guillotine? The Reign of Terror? All of this and more contributed to the French Revolution not being quite as revolutionary as it could have been. France endured multiple constitutions, the heads of heads of state literally rolled, and then they ended up with a megalomaniacal little emperor by the name of Napoleon. But how did all of this change the world, and how did it lead to other, more successful revolutions around the world? Watch this video and find out. Spoiler alert: Marie Antoinette never said, "Let them eat cake." Sorry.
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Mass Extinctions

Hank takes us on a trip through time to revisit the 5 major mass extinction events that have impacted species over the Earth's history, and leaves us with some thoughts about what could possibly be the sixth event - the one caused by human activities.
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LIVE from NASA JPL: Mars Rover Curiosity Landing : Discovery News

LIVE from NASA JPL: Mars Rover Curiosity Landing : Discovery News | End of the line | Scoop.it
At 10:31 p.m. PDT (1:31 a.m. EDT) tonight, NASA's Mars Rover Curiosity will touch down on the Red Planet. Watch it LIVE! (RT @astroengine: Stop what you're doing. We're just over 1 hr away from landing a robot on Mars!
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Hot Coffee Official Trailer

The official trailer for Hot Coffee, a documentary film by Susan Saladoff.
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The Agricultural Revolution: Crash Course World History #1

In which John Green investigates the dawn of human civilization. John looks into how people gave up hunting and gathering to become agriculturalists, and how that change has influenced the world we live in today. Also, there are some jokes about cheeseburgers
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Pussy Riot: will Vladimir Putin regret taking on Russia's cool women punks?

Pussy Riot: will Vladimir Putin regret taking on Russia's cool women punks? | End of the line | Scoop.it
For two very full, very long days in Moscow, I have talked constantly to people about Pussy Riot. About how, back in February, three young women from a feminist punk-rock band sang a song in Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Saviour. How they were arrested, imprisoned, refused bail, and now face up to seven years in jail. How the orders for this seem to have come right from the very top of the Russian government. And how their trial – starting tomorrow – seems certain to become a defining moment in Putin's political career.

It is, many people say (practically everybody, in fact), a moment when Russia's future is, in some as yet undetermined way, being decided.

At 9pm on Thursday night, I'm at a rally of a couple of thousand anti-government protesters, hearing Pussy Riot's name being chanted in the crowd, and I think I have a grasp of the story. It's an astonishing tale of how three young women have brought Putin his biggest political headache yet. A story about art versus power. Of civil society versus church and state. Or as one film-maker who's documenting it says, "punks versus Putin". (He goes on to say, "It's Crime and Punishment, basically, but there's also a band in jail so it's a bit like The Monkees. Or a really warped Beatles film.")

I think I have it sort-of clear, and then three hours later, I'm led into a basement in an industrial art space and the story untangles. It becomes not just astonishing but absurd. Because here are Pussy Riot: in their balaclavas and brightly coloured dresses and tights, sitting cross-legged on the floor of a tiny, hot, brightly lit rehearsal room.

They're not the three young women in jail: Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, 22, Maria Alekhina, 24, and Yekaterina Samutsevich, 29 – or Nadia, Masha and Katya, as they're known. Nobody has been allowed to see them. Not their husbands, families or friends. But Pussy Riot is not just three women. It's a collective of "more than 10" women, including two others who performed in the cathedral and are still at large. And all of them have vanished since the arrests. They've all gone to ground. This isn't surprising given the danger they're in. They've spent five months in hiding, waiting to see if they'll be arrested too. And this is their first interview for western media.

Although they're not the imprisoned women, they don't have to be. That's the intention of the balaclavas – they're meant to be anonymous, indivisible, representative. It doesn't matter which of them got arrested. That's the point – that they're not individuals, they're an idea. And that's the thing that has gripped Russia and caught the attention of the rest of the world, too: that the Russian government has gone and arrested an idea and is prosecuting through the courts with a vindictiveness the Russian people haven't before seen. An idea perpetrated by three young, educated, middle-class women, or devushki (girls), as the Russians call them.

And it's this that's the shock walking into the room. They're so young. So smiley. So nervous and bashful and embarrassed at the attention and not sure how to sit, or quite what they should and shouldn't say.

Pussy Riot aren't just the coolest revolutionaries you're ever likely to meet. They're also the nicest. They're the daughters that any parent would be proud to have. Smart, funny, sensitive, not afraid to stand up for their beliefs. One of them makes a point of telling me how "kindness" is an important part of their ideology. They have also done more to expose the moral bankruptcy of the Putin regime than probably anybody else. No politician, nor journalist, nor opposition figure, nor public personality has created quite this much fuss. Nor sparked such potentially significant debate. The most amazing thing of all, perhaps – more amazing even than calling themselves feminists in the land women's rights forgot – is that they've done it with art.

How does that feel? "It feels like a unique position to be in, but at the same time it's really scary. Because it's a great responsibility. Because we are not only doing it for us, we're doing it for society," says the one called Squirrel.

Most amazingly of all, perhaps, they've done it with art and rock music. The sledgehammer that they've used to take on the great might of the Russian state? That would be the colourful clothes they dressed up in. The jumping up and down they did. The funny lyrics they wrote. The loud songs they sang. That brilliant, witty, killer name.

The outfits are cartoonish, with bright, primary colours, but the masks aren't just there to shield their faces from recognition – their anonymity is both symbolic and integral to their entire artistic vision. They all have nicknames which, they say, they swap at random: Sparrow, who is 22, Balaclava, who is by some way the eldest at 33, and Squirrel, who is just 20 years old.

"It means that really everybody can be Pussy Riot… we just show people what the people can do," says Sparrow.

"We show the brutal and cruel side of the government," says Squirrel. "We don't do something illegal. It's not illegal, singing and saying what you think."

Sparrow is painfully shy and self-conscious at first. She is worried, especially that her English isn't good enough – that she won't be able to express herself properly – and she explains how she feels when she puts on the balaclava.

"When I'm in a mask I feel a little bit like a superhero and maybe feel more power. I feel really brave, I believe that I can do everything and I believe that I can change the situation."

Balaclava interrupts. "I disagree. We are not superwomen – we are pretty ordinary women and our goal is that all women in Russia can become like this without masks."

The film battery goes at that moment. And as Khristina Narizhnaya, the Moscow-based journalist who's filming the interview, changes the battery, they collapse theatrically on the floor, laughing and breathing heavy sighs of relief. "It's so strange," says Sparrow. "Seeing Pussy Riot in the papers, and on the news and the internet. You have friends saying, 'Did you see the last action?' And you have to say, 'Yes I saw it on TV'."

Do your parents know?

"No!" says Squirrel. "My dad would kill me!"

The details are so brilliant. Do you get a call, I ask, when you're out shopping and you have to dash home and put on your balaclava?

"No," says Sparrow. "It's like Batman: you always have it with you, just in case."

Just before I went to meet Pussy Riot, I'd been listening to an interview I'd done with Ilya Oskolkov-Tsentsiper, the co-founder of the Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design, a cultured and sophisticated man who's worked with Rem Koolhaas to devise a programme to train a generation of young people to change the physical and social landscape of the city, and whose conversation is steeped in Russian history.

It's an anxious time, he was saying. "I cannot think about anything else. I am literally thinking about it all the time. It's interesting that in a country that is so full of horrible things – bad and unjust and unfair things – the symbolism of this really stands out.
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£13tn hoard hidden from taxman by global elite

£13tn hoard hidden from taxman by global elite | End of the line | Scoop.it

A global super-rich elite has exploited gaps in cross-border tax rules to hide an extraordinary £13 trillion ($21tn) of wealth offshore – as much as the American and Japanese GDPs put together – according to research commissioned by the campaign group Tax Justice Network.

James Henry, former chief economist at consultancy McKinsey and an expert on tax havens, has compiled the most detailed estimates yet of the size of the offshore economy in a new report, The Price of Offshore Revisited, released exclusively to the Observer.

He shows that at least £13tn – perhaps up to £20tn – has leaked out of scores of countries into secretive jurisdictions such as Switzerland and the Cayman Islands with the help of private banks, which vie to attract the assets of so-called high net-worth individuals. Their wealth is, as Henry puts it, "protected by a highly paid, industrious bevy of professional enablers in the private banking, legal, accounting and investment industries taking advantage of the increasingly borderless, frictionless global economy". According to Henry's research, the top 10 private banks, which include UBS and Credit Suisse in Switzerland, as well as the US investment bank Goldman Sachs, managed more than £4tn in 2010, a sharp rise from £1.5tn five years earlier.

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Johnny Cash Hurt

When Trent Reznor was asked if Cash could cover his song, Reznor said he was "flattered" but worried that "the idea sounded a bit gimmicky." He became a fan of Cash's version, however, once he saw the music video.
“ I pop the video in, and wow... Tears welling, silence, goose-bumps... Wow. [I felt like] I just lost my girlfriend, because that song isn't mine anymore... It really made me think about how powerful music is as a medium and art form. I wrote some words and music in my bedroom as a way of staying sane, about a bleak and desperate place I was in, totally isolated and alone. [Somehow] that winds up reinterpreted by a music legend from a radically different era/genre and still retains sincerity and meaning — different, but every bit as pure.[3]
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O.P.P. - Naughty By Nature (HQ Audio)

1991 Classic Naughty By Nature Great Song Vid...
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Lynyrd Skynyrd - Sweet Home Alabama (1977)

"The Day On The Green" at the Oakland Coliseum Stadium, July 2, 1977. Just three months before plane crash. Thanks Bill Graham. Skynyrd rocks! You can see Neil Young on Ronnie's T-shirt.
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