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Railroad Delays Hitting Hard in Minnesota

Railroad Delays Hitting Hard in Minnesota | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

A high demand for grain shipment caused by a record harvest this year is driving long waits and high prices in Minnesota and across the county, according to experts.

All farmers are being affected by delays in shipping commodities by rail, but some are having a harder time than others, Minnesota Public Radio News reported. Farm groups in western Minnesota, as well as North and South Dakota, are experiencing some of the longest waits and highest prices.

Grain shippers in the northern and western parts of the state have few options beyond rail, said Jerry Fruin, agricultural economics professor at the University of Minnesota. But farmers in southern Minnesota are able to ship by barge via the Mississippi River. Although they have more options for storing or selling their grain locally, waits to move grain can produce added costs that run into the hundreds of millions, according to some estimates.

"When you get into transportation shortages, the price of transportation will probably go up to meet the demand," Fruin said.

When the rail car shortage hit, the cost of shipping more than doubled for many grain elevators. Farmers foot the bill for those increases since transportation costs are deducted from the price per bushels an elevator pays for grain, Fruin said.

"It is generally equal to what the transportation cost is to the market that you are wanting to send it to," he said.

The typical cost of corn is between 20 and 40 cents a bushel. The rail car shortage caused the price of rail shipping, and in turn the price of corn, to skyrocket. Many grain elevators in northwest Minnesota are paying low prices for corn because of the shipping costs, according to Tom Haag, former president of the Minnesota Corn Growers Association.

A recent study conducted by the University of Minnesota estimates the state's farmers have already lost $100 million, mainly because of the shipping shortage.


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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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Americans put off having babies amid poor economy

Americans put off having babies amid poor economy | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
Births have plummeted since their 2007 peak, and the recession is a factor. There's worry that the birthrate will be affected for years.

 

The graph for this article is an incredible visual that highlights how the economic conditions of a country can impact its demographics.  Not surprisingly, Americans have less children during tough times.  Questions to ponder: would this phenomenon be expected in all parts of the world?  Why or why not?  Demographically, what will the long-term impact of the recession be?    


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The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst

The Best Countries to Be a Woman -- and the Worst | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

Hint: India is last among the G20 and the United States didn't crack the top five in the latest survey to reflect poorly on the situation of American women.

 

A poll of 370 gender experts yielded some interesting results that reflect the local cultural, economic, political and developmental geographies.  Beyond using the lists of best and worst countries (since the rankings are still based on rather subjective criteria), students can come up with their most important factors in evaluating gender equity and evaluate the countries based on their own evaluations. 


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Hijab: A Different Definition of Freedom

Hijab: A Different Definition of Freedom | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
Hijab: A Different Definition of Freedom http://t.co/WzAFA5Fv...

 

The meaning you ascribe to a cultural artifact is inherently based on your cultural perceptions and values.  While many in the West perceive the hijab to be a symbol of male hegemonic power and female oppression.  In this article that defends the Hijab, it is presented as a distinct form of female liberation.


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Khanh Fleshman's curator insight, December 5, 2013 3:21 PM

This is on my page because it offers a different perspective to how clothing affects gender equality. It shows how the women in these societies don't see their restrictive clothing requirements as holding them back, but rather as empowering them. They instead feel that people can appreciate them for their brains and personality rather than body. People that could  benefit from reading this article are any Westerners that feel sorry for these women because of the way ther are required to dress. It gives the perspective of the women in these societies. This relates to Half the Sky because the book also has a section about how the women in these societies actually feel sorry for the women in our societies that have to change their bodies and clothing to please men, and how they are angry when people feel bad for them.

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The World of 100 : Toby Ng Design

The World of 100 : Toby Ng Design | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

If the world were a village of 100 people, how would the composition be? This set of 20 posters is built on statistics about the spread of population around the world under various classifications.


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Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..".

Development and Demographic Changes: "The last woman..". | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

While global population now is almost reaching 7 billion, mainly to due high birth rates in the developing world, many of the more developed parts of Asia (and elsewhere) are facing shrinking population as fewer women are choosing to marry and have children. 

 

This is a very concrete way to discuss the Demographic Transition Model and population issues around the world.   Cultural values shifting, globalization and demographics all merge together in this issue. 


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Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 20, 2015 2:05 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article is about how many countries in the world are experiencing a shrinking population in women. In about 83 countries women are going on marriage strikes by refusing to get married. This has caused a severe drop in the amount of women being born. There are predictions that some countries such as Hong Kong will see their last woman born in the year 2798. Many places are now trying to encourage people to have daughters in order to offset the low female composition. 

 

This relates to unit 2 because it deals with population and sex composition. In man countries the female population is dramatically dropping and scientist are predicting women to die out. This also relates to government policies because some places are trying to change the outcome and encourage females. This shows what technology and visualization of populations can do to predict the future. 

Seth Forman's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:25 PM

Summary:  This article provides an optimistic outlook on future population growth.  Stating that in wealthy countries and cities with no migration population may even disappear.  

 

Insight:  While this article seems very hard to believe considering what we've learned I think it represents Unit 2 very well because it still analyzes population growth over time based on female wealth.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:36 PM

This article illustrated how women are becoming more independent and educated. The article tells you that women, "... are preferring the single life, to marital yoke." This leads to the decrease of fertility rates. As women start to focus more on themselves and their career; instead of building a family, they tend to wait on having kids. This trend is occuring especially in Asian countries. Statistics from the UN conclude that if fertility rates don't increase, in 83 countries, women will not have daughters to replace them. For example Hong Kong, it is predicted that 1,000 women will only produce 547 daughters. The drop is now having reseachers predict when populations will see, "...birth of its last women". The female population in Hong will decrease from 3.75 million to 1 million in 25 generations. Researchers say Hong Kong will see the last, "...birth of its last women" in 2798!  The article used a country-year diagram to show what year the countries will see the last birth of its women.

 

This article relates to topics in Unit 2: Population and Migration. It uses a composition model to organize and efficiently show its data. The article and model shows patterns of fertility and prediction and facts of how a change in the lifestyle of women are affecting populations all over the world. Populations are greatly affected to the point where they can become eradicated. The article was really interesting and I was surprised at how short the predicted amount of time is for the last birth of a women in a population. This article also really illustrates and reveal how women play a big part in - what was- a man dominating world.

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NYTimes: One Roof, Three Generations

NYTimes: One Roof, Three Generations | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
In a converted apartment building in Chinatown, five adults and seven children blend traditional values and rituals with modern roles and responsibilities.

 

This article from the New York Times by Sarah Kramer leads to many cultural question worth exploring.  How does migration impact the culture of families?  How is culture maintained and reproduced?  Why is maintaining cultural connection so vital to these families?  


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Vanuatu: Meet The Natives

"Five men from the remote Pacific island of Tanna arrive in America to experience western culture for the first time, and force us to look at ourselves through brand new eyes..."

 

This cross-cultural experiment reinforces numerous stereotypes, but also seeks to get viewers to look at issues from a variety of perspectives.  Folk cultures, modernization and globalization are all major themes of this show.     


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 10, 2015 7:14 PM

This reminds me of what we learned in class about American people or white folks in general go to a native island and want to see the natives uncivilized and not up with the times of technology, clothes, homes made of up to date material. They want to see grass skirts, old tools, tribal living. The white folks see modern times already they want to see old things.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:19 PM

I think exercises like this are really cool, there are a lot of these experiments that go on with culture swaps and I always find the reactions when returning home to be probably the most interesting, just like in this video it is a large celebrations and it helps to put things in perspective

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:42 PM

This is a show that is based on how we see and view daily life of native people as compared to our own. How ever I feel as though this show is more based on the how these people actually live rather then adapting and learning to the area that they are in. It does show how globalization plays an important role in the show.

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iTunes: Geography Videos

iTunes: Geography Videos | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

Two videos from a TV producer who is now in the geography classroom are available for free in the iTunes store.  The 1st video shows a lot of great examples of material culture items found during archeological digs called "The Ancient Agora." 

 

The 4th is a 30 minute film on the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, which shows many sacred sites, burial/cremation practices, and other aspects of Nepali culture.  For more work by this fellow geography teacher see: http://www.agiftforthevillage.blogspot.com/


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What side of the road do people drive on?

What side of the road do people drive on? | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

Simple, fun and effective...this is a great little tool.  As you select a country, the flag will appear on the roof of the car and the car will shift lanes or stay in the same one(as pictured here, in Costa Rica they drive on the right side of the road).  Where are the 'left lane countries?'  What similarities do they have besides lane preference?     


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Born in the USA, Made in France

Born in the USA, Made in France | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
Born in the USA, Made in France: How McDonald's Succeeds in the Land of Michelin Stars by Knowledge@Wharton, the online business journal of the Wharton School.

 

While many portray McDonald's as the embodiment of all that is wrong with globalization, the diffusion of McDonald's is not a simple replication of the American fast food chain and exporting it elsewhere...a lot of local adaptations on a global model is part of McDonald's successful economic model.   Although I'm not a fan of the word "glocalization" to describe how local flavor adds spice to globalized phenomenon, it most certainly fits here.   


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Amy in ATL's curator insight, February 16, 2015 8:04 PM

This is a quick and easy way to understand the difference between glocalization and globalization using the basic needs...FOOD!

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Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid

Over 27 and unmarried? In China, you’re an old maid | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
January and February are sweet times for most Chinese — they enjoy family reunions during the spring festival, which this year fell on January 23, and they celebrate Valentine’s Day, which is well-liked in China.

 

Gender roles in cultural norms change from country to country.  What also needs to be understood is how the demographic situation of a given country influences these patterns. 


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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 1:32 PM

It is interesting to see this as in American culture, marrying in your 20s is not a necessity anymore, it's almost unexpected. With so many men to choose from, these girls have time to find a man. The culture is going to shift as these ladies get married later in life.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 14, 2014 9:13 PM

Being 27 years old and unmarried in China considers you to be an old maid? I had to do a double take when I saw this. In the United States, 27 years old is around the average age a couple decides to get married. In China, Valentine's day is a really well liked holiday. Therefore, you would think that there would be excessive amounts of marriages, especially around this time. However, we know about the one child policy put into place at China. I can imagine that this might play a role because of the gender imbalances. As horrible as this sounds, in China, they call the women who are thirty and single "leftovers". During the season of the Chinese New Year and Valentine's Day, the "leftovers" just get questioned about their relationship status or go to matchmaking parties. However, the "leftovers" are said to have three good things; good career, good education and good looks. This is interesting because if they had all these good qualities, why would they still be single at 30 years old? As the article continues, we talk about true love and believe it or not, some "leftovers" still believe in true love and that they may experience that one day.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:14 PM

The fact that success relatively young women are seen as leftovers in China is a completely foreign idea to me.  n the United States we are seeing that more and more women are marrying later in life after they have received an education, higher education and have been established in a career.  Emily Liang is an extremely successful women who should be proud of her accomplishments, yet has to declare herself as "divorced" in order for men to think something isn't "wrong" with her.  It is extremely obvious that the role and view of women in China is significantly distorted. 

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:20 AM

This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C. educator shows how food deserts and other spatial problems of poverty impact his students on a daily basis.  We usually look at life expectancy data at the national scale and that obscures some of the real issues of poverty in developed countries.  Above is a map that shows the Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was recently added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit).  Here are some maps and data from the World Bank that utilizes the Gini Index as well as an interactive Gapminder graph.  


Tags: industry, location, place, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.

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Why the fax thrives in Japan

Why the fax thrives in Japan | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
The Japanese are regarded as a hi-tech nation, the country that gave the world huge electronics companies. Why, then, are faxes so popular there?

 

The technology that we use is in part dependent on our cultural values and what how we interact with others. 


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How Gandhi made tea taboo

How Gandhi made tea taboo | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

Tea is one of India's most popular beverages and may soon become the national drink. But for many years, it was considered a poison.


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Gender: The Shocking Truth

Gender: The Shocking Truth | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

"In the poorest regions of the world, girls are among the most disadvantaged people on the planet.

 

---One billion people live in extreme poverty—70% are women and girls.67 million children worldwide don’t go to school, over half are girls.

---One extra year of primary school can mean 10-20% higher wages for a girl.

---When a girl in the developing world stays in school for seven or more years, she’ll marry later and have fewer, healthier children."

 

This site links to the "Because I Am a Girl" initiative which is designed to break the cycle of poverty and strengthen communities.  http://www.planusa.org/becauseiamagirl/ ;


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365 Reflections on Why Geography and GIS Matter

365 Reflections on Why Geography and GIS Matter | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

"In 2011, beginning on New Year’s Day, as president of the National Council for Geographic Education, I wrote one tweet everyday beginning with “What is Geography? 1 of 365” and posted them to my Twitter page. OK, I confess that I actually posted multiple posts every day, sometimes up to 10. There is just so much on this topic to write about! And I continue these efforts in 2012.

 

My goals in the series were several. First, I sought to point out as organization president how the NCGE serves the geography education community, and has been doing so since 1915. Through its webinars, book and journal publications, annual conference, curriculum, research, partnerships, and networking opportunities, the NCGE supports excellence in teaching and learning geography. Second, I wanted to provide evidence of the diversity of geography. Those outside the geographic community might have an incomplete or even erroneous view of geography as a discipline. I wanted to nudge people beyond thinking of geography only as the location of things, to provide an idea what geographers study and what they care about. I explored themes of scale, patterns, and relationships, topics such as watersheds, energy, ecoregions, climate, and population density, and discussed different regions while on work travel to Salzburg Austria, San Francisco, New York City, San Diego, Minneapolis, and elsewhere. Geography is diversity in people, landscapes, issues, skills, and themes....."


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National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker

National Atlas: Interactive Mapmaker | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

The National Atlas that is available online has an extensive database for simple online mapping.  This is "GIS-light," an easy way to explore the spatial patterns within U.S. census data and other data sets.  The lists all contain a wide variety of variables, making this a good way to get students to explore potential research topics.  Thanks to the Connecticut Geographic Alliance coordinator for suggesting this link.   


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, August 27, 2012 11:10 AM
I think this website is great! I can see myself using this in a classroom. It provides a clear visual for students and anyone in general to view statistics on a variety of content.
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'Where Children Sleep'

'Where Children Sleep' | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
James Mollison wanted to portray children's diverse worlds. What better way to do so than to photograph their bedrooms?

 

Pictures with the children and the space they inhabit, creates a more personal touch to geographic context for students.  It builds what I call "geographic empathy," which builds on commonalities, instead of just reinforcing stereotypes.   


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Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 4:06 PM

This article is very interesting as it shows so much cultural difference by just taking pictures of a child's bedroom. The pictures portray the family's wealth, religion, technological advancements, and parenting style. 

 

When you look at the difference between some of the pictures it is horrible. Some of the children have an abundance of toys, while others don't even have their own room or have to sleep on the ground. It is also interesting to see how some pictures portray the person's lifestyle. Some have a very minimalist room with little luxuries, which can be for religious reasons or personal style. 

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Daily Show: The Amazing Racism - Geographical Bigotry

Wyatt Cenac reports on racially charged geographical names in America.

 

Discretion is advised since there is some offensive language in this comedy sketch.  Yet underneath is a serious point about racially insensitive toponyms and their legacy in the United States (recently in the news with Gov. Perry in Texas).  Geographer Mark Monmonier tackles this topic in his book, "From Squaw Tit to Whorehouse Meadow: How Maps Name, Claim, and Inflame."


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LEARN

"3 guys, 44 days, 11 countries, 18 flights, 38 thousand miles, an exploding volcano, 2 cameras and almost a terabyte of footage." 

This video beautifully encapsulates the spirit of a globalized educational experience and the value of geographic understanding in an ever-interconnected world.   Geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures and other ways of doing things.  In a three part series including 'Eat' and 'Move.' 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 27, 2011 10:04 PM
I agree completely with geography is about broadening our minds to other places, other cultures, and other ways of doing things. You need to be apart of other cultures, and other country norms in order to truly respect them and learn about them. Overall you need to explore other places, and cultures with all your five senses. You need to be able to see the beauty of the place, taste the foods of the culture, listen to the sounds arounds you, smell the the distinctive scents, and touch and feel the concrete piece of land.
Seth Dixon's comment, November 29, 2011 5:49 PM
I'm a sucker for these video clips since they embody the joy of experiencing the new and the different.
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 12:30 PM

This is great because it shows people are round the world what great people and cultures are available for people to explore. It also shows that great spirit that people are exposed to. It also shows that people are outgoing and do not let nothing bring them down.

 

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USATODAY.com - Topography of religion

USATODAY.com - Topography of religion | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it

An excellent visual aid to process the religious data in the United States.  Roll the cursor over the map (after clicking on the link) to see any particular state's religious data.  What patterns do you notice?  Are there religious regions that could be drawn based on this data? 


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Rishi Suresh's curator insight, January 16, 2014 12:43 PM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it gives a state-by-state breakdown on religion, and gives more detailed facts about religions in different states by percentages.

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This map shows how the US is dominated by Protestants and Catholics, and all other religions are minority in here.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to this section because it shows how religions are distributed around the US and what is dominant and where.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the "demographics" of religion as it is distributed accross the U.S. According to the map, Christianity is the most popular donomination in the U.S, followed by Judaism.

Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 20, 2014 5:02 PM

This post is scooped to show the percentages of the religions and their adherents in the United States. It relates to the section by showing a bit of the distribution through the percentages. 

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The Plight of China's Favored Sons

The Plight of China's Favored Sons | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
For China's government, social stability is threatened by a gender imbalance likely to leave up to 40 million Chinese without a wife.

 

There are many results of population policies such as the 'One-Child Policy' in China, which is primarily aimed at reducing population growth. Some on these consequences are unintended; due to parents preferences for male children there is a strong gender imbalance in China which has some serious sociological and cultural implications. For more about Asian society, follow: http://asiasociety.org/blog/asia/2012-watch-out-chinese-bachelors


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The Pop vs. Soda Page

The Pop vs. Soda Page | EMY Social Studies | Scoop.it
A page that plots the geographic distribution of the terms "pop" and "soda" when used to describe carbonated beverages...

 

This is an old classic that is going viral on Facebook right now, so I thought it would be time to link you to the original.  This map isn't just cool, but a great portal to a discussion on regions, diffusion and cultural identity.  This is a modern 'shibboleth' for the United States, a way to show where you are from to some extent.  What are other 'shibboleths' that make your region distinct?  


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cookiesrgreat's comment, February 2, 2012 5:23 PM
Other could mean "cola" or "drink"
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 16, 2012 5:05 PM
Such a neat map that certainly illustrates the differences between US states. Seeing this map and the reasons for the variation in name makes sense. Of course soda is called "Coke" in the south. Georgia is the home of the Coke Cola Factory.
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 9, 2014 11:44 PM

Unit 1